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  • Where to Golf in Denver?

    Hello Gents,
    I am heading to Denver this fall and have recently taken up golf - having a blast. Anyway, I wanted to ask about the Denver area courses, understanding that I am pretty much a beginner. I've been doing this for about six weeks, and can shoot in the upper eighties. My wife is shooting low 100's, so we don't want to try something too frustrating or too technical. Just something picturesque. So, probably more of a long, less technical course.

    Any suggestions? I'm looking at some deals on golfnow.com, but really have no idea which place to choose. Any help/advice is greatly appreciated.

    Probably playing on Monday, September 22 if the off-day makes any difference.

  • #2
    6 weeks and already shooting in the 80s?

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    • #3
      Welshire is a decent course that's open to the public.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Drunken.Broncoholic2 View Post
        6 weeks and already shooting in the 80s?
        I started with a week of lessons so I could develop the right habits. After that, I got a used Ping driver that knocks the hell out of the ball. So, I feel pretty happy with where I am right now. I've dropped a couple rounds in the upper 90's, but in general I have been hitting between 85-94. I'm not sure i've really taken on any "difficult" courses, but hey, i'm a newbie.

        For full disclosure, I generally allow for 2 mulligans from the tee box, and often I will chip 2 balls on my final approach to the green (maybe 6 or 8 holes per round). I'm still learning and find that chipping 2 really allows me to learn my clubs and technique.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cmhargrove View Post

          For full disclosure, I generally allow for 2 mulligans from the tee box, and often I will chip 2 balls on my final approach to the green (maybe 6 or 8 holes per round). I'm still learning and find that chipping 2 really allows me to learn my clubs and technique.
          Then you are probably closer to 100 than 80.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cmhargrove View Post
            I started with a week of lessons so I could develop the right habits. After that, I got a used Ping driver that knocks the hell out of the ball. So, I feel pretty happy with where I am right now. I've dropped a couple rounds in the upper 90's, but in general I have been hitting between 85-94. I'm not sure i've really taken on any "difficult" courses, but hey, i'm a newbie.

            For full disclosure, I generally allow for 2 mulligans from the tee box, and often I will chip 2 balls on my final approach to the green (maybe 6 or 8 holes per round). I'm still learning and find that chipping 2 really allows me to learn my clubs and technique.
            Your scores are impressive for just starting. My few recommendations are as follows: Short game, short game, short game - that is the quickest way to lower your score. Second - know what the term Ready Golf means both for you and your wife. I trained my kids that there is no reason for longer than 1:45 for 9 holes of golf no matter how far you hit the ball (assuming there isn't anyone in front of you). Take one practice swing and hit it.

            I learned to play on some 9 hole courses in the communities north of Denver and on some of the muni's in the Denver area - Willis Case, Wellshire, Kennedy, etc. So many to pick from at a reasonable cost.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DENVERDUI55 View Post
              Then you are probably closer to 100 than 80.
              I won't argue - i'm no pro. I've shot two clean games in the low 90's (with no mulligans or double-chips). Anyway, I feel pretty good about my progress, and don't feel it's wrong to double-chip a few holes while i'm learning. I'm just playing for fun, so I don't see the harm.

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              • #8
                Play the ball down from the beginning no mulligans, it's the only way. If you do this you will learn to hit shots under any conditions. I play with some guys that roll or noodle the ball during the round and when it comes to tournament play they can't understand why they are about 10 to 15 strokes over their handicap.

                I have a USGA (GHIN) handicap of six and my wife has a 12 handicap and we play in couples tournaments in four state area and its a blast.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cmhargrove View Post
                  I won't argue - i'm no pro. I've shot two clean games in the low 90's (with no mulligans or double-chips). Anyway, I feel pretty good about my progress, and don't feel it's wrong to double-chip a few holes while i'm learning. I'm just playing for fun, so I don't see the harm.
                  Keep at it it is a rewarding and challenging game. I got a buddy who shoots pretty well except takes a mulligan. The time I played him he turned that mulligan into a birdie when it should of been 3 off the tee from a hosel rocket.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
                    Play the ball down from the beginning no mulligans, it's the only way. If you do this you will learn to hit shots under any conditions. I play with some guys that roll or noodle the ball during the round and when it comes to tournament play they can't understand why they are about 10 to 15 strokes over their handicap.

                    I have a USGA (GHIN) handicap of six and my wife has a 12 handicap and we play in couples tournaments in four state area and its a blast.
                    This is some great advice. I have played with one guy who was as good as advertised. Most guys that claim a certain handicap don't play correctly. They take mulligan and don't re hit from out of bounds shots. Picking up 3 footers too.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cmhargrove View Post
                      Hello Gents,
                      I am heading to Denver this fall and have recently taken up golf - having a blast. Anyway, I wanted to ask about the Denver area courses, understanding that I am pretty much a beginner. I've been doing this for about six weeks, and can shoot in the upper eighties. My wife is shooting low 100's, so we don't want to try something too frustrating or too technical. Just something picturesque. So, probably more of a long, less technical course.

                      Any suggestions? I'm looking at some deals on golfnow.com, but really have no idea which place to choose. Any help/advice is greatly appreciated.

                      Probably playing on Monday, September 22 if the off-day makes any difference.
                      Scenery wise you may be able to get on Arrowhead after 2pm on Monday for a reasonable price. The course is OK but you really are paying for the views and wildlife

                      I also like Fox Hollow on Morrison Road . Nice course , well kept and views of the mountains

                      Fossil Trace is nice in Golden but it's pretty tight.

                      Sounds like you are more or less practicing on the course then keeping score if you play mulligans and mutliple approach shots.

                      Learn how to mange the speed of your putts. Keep track of 3+ putts and you will see where you can really cut down from 100 to 90 pretty easily
                      Last edited by CEH; 07-14-2014, 02:07 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cmhargrove View Post
                        I won't argue - i'm no pro. I've shot two clean games in the low 90's (with no mulligans or double-chips). Anyway, I feel pretty good about my progress, and don't feel it's wrong to double-chip a few holes while i'm learning. I'm just playing for fun, so I don't see the harm.
                        You're certainly going in the right direction. Many would just hack away their first few months. Pony boy is right about learning all the shots properly as you face them during your round.

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                        • #13
                          Great course is Aqua Golf at 501 W. FLORIDA Ave. In Denver. Google raring of 4.7 and yelp at 4. Thry are open 10am to 10pm so late start but you play late too with lights! Fun course for the beginners too and some holes have views with water traps so be careful! (720) 865-0880.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
                            Play the ball down from the beginning no mulligans, it's the only way. If you do this you will learn to hit shots under any conditions. I play with some guys that roll or noodle the ball during the round and when it comes to tournament play they can't understand why they are about 10 to 15 strokes over their handicap.

                            I have a USGA (GHIN) handicap of six and my wife has a 12 handicap and we play in couples tournaments in four state area and its a blast.
                            I certainly agree in principle, but I feel like the only way to really learn a sport/game is with repetition. I hit all the shots as presented, it's just that I am still learning how to hold and swing the club in varying situations. For an example, let's say my last approach shot is a 30 yard uphill shot over a sand trap. My feet are on an incline, and things change - balance, stance, club length. I can't re-create that scenario on my local chipping green, so why not pitch two balls to see if I can learn anything about technique? It just seems silly to try that shot maybe once a month, then get a single shot at it again 30 days later.

                            It's not my desire to "double chip" forever, but why not learn something while I have the chance? I only play a ball I have truly hit, so i'm still the one playing the ball regardless. Seems like a "honest" thing to do while learning how to play a pretty complex game.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by broncocalijohn View Post
                              Great course is Aqua Golf at 501 W. FLORIDA Ave. In Denver. Google raring of 4.7 and yelp at 4. Thry are open 10am to 10pm so late start but you play late too with lights! Fun course for the beginners too and some holes have views with water traps so be careful! (720) 865-0880.
                              Casa Bonita for dinner afterwards!

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