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With its ‘cult of ignorance and anti-intellectualism’ the U.S. risks falling behind rivals in Asia.

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  • With its ‘cult of ignorance and anti-intellectualism’ the U.S. risks falling behind rivals in Asia.

    I have been traveling to East Asia (and many other parts of the world) for more than 25 years and over that time one of the things that has always struck me is how intelligent the general public in countries like Japan appear to be. It’s not that there aren’t dummies in East Asia, but it always seems that the average level of education and ability to think about the world intelligently and critically is impressively widespread. I’ve often thought about why this is the case and also why the same seems more difficult to say about the U.S. The answer, I think, can be found in a comment science fiction writer Isaac Asimov made about the U.S. while being interviewed in the 1980s: “There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

    Asimov is right on the mark, and this cult of ignorance is the most serious national security issue facing the U.S. today. It is more important than the external threats from terrorists or the rise of a politically and economically powerful China. And a major part of the reason it is such an major issue for Americans to fix is that our immediate competitors, particularly those in Asia, have managed to create a culture in which rather than a cult of ignorance, a cult of intelligence plays a major role in shaping attitudes about the world and, thus, policies about dealing with other countries.

    Many Americans are aware that the U.S. does not score well on measures such as international student assessment tests when compared to other industrial countries. For example, the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TMISS) the top five countries for math were Singapore, South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan—the U.S. is not in the top ten. It is better by 8th grade, where the same counties are in the top five (although the order changes) and the U.S. makes number 9. Roughly the same pattern can bee seen for science results. This doesn’t seem too bad, but in a different testing organization’s measure, the Programme for International Student Assessment, the U.S. does not fare quite so well, scoring 36th for math, 28th for science, and 24th for reading. With the exception of science, where Finland is ranked 5th, all of the top five countries in this measure are from East Asia.

    http://thediplomat.com/2014/06/asias...-intelligence/

  • #2
    Originally posted by baja View Post
    I have been traveling to East Asia (and many other parts of the world) for more than 25 years and over that time one of the things that has always struck me is how intelligent the general public in countries like Japan appear to be. It’s not that there aren’t dummies in East Asia, but it always seems that the average level of education and ability to think about the world intelligently and critically is impressively widespread. I’ve often thought about why this is the case and also why the same seems more difficult to say about the U.S. The answer, I think, can be found in a comment science fiction writer Isaac Asimov made about the U.S. while being interviewed in the 1980s: “There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

    Asimov is right on the mark, and this cult of ignorance is the most serious national security issue facing the U.S. today. It is more important than the external threats from terrorists or the rise of a politically and economically powerful China. And a major part of the reason it is such an major issue for Americans to fix is that our immediate competitors, particularly those in Asia, have managed to create a culture in which rather than a cult of ignorance, a cult of intelligence plays a major role in shaping attitudes about the world and, thus, policies about dealing with other countries.

    Many Americans are aware that the U.S. does not score well on measures such as international student assessment tests when compared to other industrial countries. For example, the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TMISS) the top five countries for math were Singapore, South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan—the U.S. is not in the top ten. It is better by 8th grade, where the same counties are in the top five (although the order changes) and the U.S. makes number 9. Roughly the same pattern can bee seen for science results. This doesn’t seem too bad, but in a different testing organization’s measure, the Programme for International Student Assessment, the U.S. does not fare quite so well, scoring 36th for math, 28th for science, and 24th for reading. With the exception of science, where Finland is ranked 5th, all of the top five countries in this measure are from East Asia.

    http://thediplomat.com/2014/06/asias...-intelligence/
    They may be intelligent but they like to bury their head in the sand when they find out info they don't like to hear. All you have to do is look at the ***ushima disaster. Their government has told them many parts near the plant are safe to go back and live around. Watched a piece on Vice last month and they have these radiation level monitors around this school which gives a readout of the radiation levels around the school. A team from Vice went in there with their own reading devices and found that the radiation levels were much much higher then the stand still devices the government had set up. No doubt those things were rigged to give a certain reading and no higher.
    Last edited by ZONA; 06-22-2014, 01:35 PM.

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    • #3
      I see we reached the part of the off season where Baja ****s in America like a coward.

      Comment


      • #4
        Higher educashun is for them damn libruls. We need to get rid of it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rohirrim View Post
          Higher educashun is for them damn libruls. We need to get rid of it.

          Would probably help if higher education focused on education and not classes on white guilt or radical feminism.

          Because that matters.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DBroncos4life View Post
            I see we reached the part of the off season where Baja ****s in America like a coward.
            The first step to fixing a problem is to recognize there is a problem.

            Comment


            • #7
              Those who, through pride, refuse to admit to a problem are doomed to the consequences of said problem.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by baja View Post
                Those who, through pride, refuse to admit to a problem are doomed to the consequences of said problem.
                Who cares about whether somebody is intellectually interesting or not? Based on which country they are from - really? That is your premise? Sounds like a crisis to me - let's get Oprah and Dr. Phil involved

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                • #9
                  America is in decline.


                  Education is declining.

                  Economy is declining.

                  Physical and Mental health is in the toilet.

                  Politics are corrupt.

                  We are 17 Trillion in debt.

                  Ect, ect, ect..


                  I think its fair to blame the federal government and large corporations for destroying this country. It's almost as if they are trying to.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kevin8Nine View Post
                    America is in decline.


                    Education is declining.

                    Economy is declining.

                    Physical and Mental health is in the toilet.

                    Politics are corrupt.

                    We are 17 Trillion in debt.

                    Ect, ect, ect..


                    I think its fair to blame the federal government and large corporations for destroying this country. It's almost as if they are trying to.

                    Now now the peeps on here are going to call you anti American. The truth is unacceptable.

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                    • #11
                      Seriously, as much as you hate America you should have nothing to do with it.

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                      • #12
                        Traitors!!!

                        No one is to think or say anything negative about the glorious USA!!

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                        • #13
                          "“There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”'

                          This describes your behavior perfectly Baja. Kinda ironic you don't have the self realization to understand that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by McDman View Post
                            Seriously, as much as you hate America you should have nothing to do with it.
                            You may disagree with him, however, when someone expresses concern about something, it rarely means they dislike it. In fact, typically the opposite is the case.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BroncoFiend View Post
                              You may disagree with him, however, when someone expresses concern about something, it rarely means they dislike it. In fact, typically the opposite is the case.
                              Might help if Baja didn't flee the country.

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