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OT: Tiananmen Square Massacre 25 years

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  • OT: Tiananmen Square Massacre 25 years



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananm...otests_of_1989

    Tiananmen Square protests of 1989
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    June Fourth Incident
    Part of Chinese Democracy Movement in 1989
    Wider shot by Stuart Franklin showing the rest of the tank column.[1]
    Type 59 tanks on Tiananmen Square. "Tank Man" is visible in the lower left.
    Date 15 April 1989 – 4 June 1989
    (1 month, 2 weeks and 6 days)
    Location Beijing
    400 cities nationwide
    Causes

    Death of Hu Yaobang
    Economic reform
    Inflation
    Political corruption
    Economic nepotism (especially regarding Zhao Ziyang's and Deng Xiaoping's sons)
    Career prospects
    Social unrest in Eastern Europe

    Goals Social equality, "A Communist Party Without Corruption", freedom of the press, freedom of speech, socialism, democracy
    Methods Hunger strike, sit-in, occupation of public square
    Result

    Enforcement of martial law in certain areas of Beijing executed by force from 3 June 1989 (declared from 20 May 1989 – 10 January 1990, 7 months and 3 weeks)
    Tens of deaths and hundreds of injuries of military and police personnel (in riots and accidents)
    Protesters (mainly workers) and rioters barricading the PLA troops and nearby innocent civilians shot by some PLA troops (mainly 38th Army) on multiple sites in Beijing but outside of Tiananmen Square, hundreds killed, more wounded
    Uncertain reports of few and isolated deaths of civilians near Tiananmen Square
    Protesters (mainly students) peacefully withdrew from Tiananmen Square after negotiating with the PLA
    Protest leaders and pro-democracy activists later exiled or imprisoned
    Democracy Movement suppressed
    Zhao Ziyang purged
    Jiang Zemin promoted
    Western economic sanctions and arms embargoes on the PRC
    Market reforms delayed
    Media control tightened
    Political reform halted

    Parties to the civil conflict
    Communist Party of China
    China Government of the People's Republic of China
    China Emblem PLA.svg People's Liberation Army
    People's Armed Police cap badge 2007.png People's Armed Police (no gunfire)

    University students
    Factory workers
    Intellectuals
    Pro-democracy protesters
    Reformists
    Lead figures

    hardliners

    Deng Xiaoping
    Li Peng
    Yang Shangkun
    Yao Yilin
    Li Ximing
    Chen Xitong
    Chi Haotian
    Liu Huaqing

    moderates

    Zhao Ziyang
    Hu Qili
    Yan Mingfu
    Bao Tong
    Wan Li
    Xu Qinxian



    student leaders

    Wu'erkaixi
    Chai Ling
    Wang Dan
    Liu Gang
    Feng Congde
    Li Lu

    intellectuals

    Liu Xiaobo
    Wang Juntao
    Dai Qing
    Hou Dejian

    Casualties
    Death(s) 241–2,600
    Injuries 7,000–10,000

    The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, commonly known as the June Fourth Incident (六四事件) or more accurately '89 Democracy Movement (八九民运) in Chinese,[2] were student-led popular demonstrations in Beijing which took place in the spring of 1989 and received broad support from city residents, exposing deep splits within China's political leadership. The protests were forcibly suppressed by hardline leaders who ordered the military to enforce martial law in the country's capital.[3][4] The crackdown that initiated on June 3–4 became known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre or the June 4 Massacre as troops with assault rifles and tanks inflicted casualties on unarmed civilians trying to block the military's advance towards Tiananmen Square in the heart of Beijing, which student demonstrators had occupied for seven weeks. The scale of military mobilization and the resulting bloodshed were unprecedented in the history of Beijing, a city with a rich tradition of popular protests in the 20th century.[5]

    The Chinese government condemned the protests as a "counter-revolutionary riot", and has prohibited all forms of discussion or remembrance of the events since.[6][7] Due to the lack of information from China, many aspects of the events remain unknown or unconfirmed. Estimates of the death toll range from a few hundred to the thousands.[8]

    The protests were triggered in April 1989 by the death of former Communist Party General Secretary, Hu Yaobang, a liberal reformer, who was deposed after losing a power struggle with hardliners over the direction of political and economic reform.[9] University students marched and gathered in Tiananmen Square to mourn. Hu had also voiced grievances against inflation, limited career prospects, and corruption of the party elite.[10] The protesters called for government accountability, freedom of the press, freedom of speech, and the restoration of workers' control over industry.[11][12] At the height of the protests, about a million people assembled in the Square.[13]

    The government initially took a conciliatory stance toward the protesters.[14] The student-led hunger strike galvanized support for the demonstrators around the country and the protests spread to 400 cities by mid-May.[15] Ultimately, China's paramount leader Deng Xiaoping and other party elders resolved to use force.[16] Party authorities declared martial law on May 20, and mobilized as many as 300,000 troops to Beijing.[15]

    In the aftermath of the crackdown, the government conducted widespread arrests of protesters and their supporters, cracked down on other protests around China, expelled foreign journalists and strictly controlled coverage of the events in the domestic press. The police and internal security forces were strengthened. Officials deemed sympathetic to the protests were demoted or purged.[17] Zhao Ziyang was ousted in a party leadership reshuffle and replaced with Jiang Zemin. Political reforms were largely halted and economic reforms did not resume until Deng Xiaoping's 1992 southern tour.[18][19] The Chinese government was widely condemned internationally for the use of force against the protesters. Western governments imposed economic sanctions and arms embargoes.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...o-9481466.html

    Tiananmen Square 25th anniversary – the massacre as it happened: 'Rows of troops advanced slowly, shooting directly into the crowd'

  • #2
    Anyone remember Tank Man?

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    • #3
      No one knows who he is, or what happened to him.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Garcia Bronco View Post
        Anyone remember Tank Man?
        There was a great piece about this on NPR today, apparently only about 15% of Chinese college students have seen that picture. The censorship in China relating to the event is so extreme that it's almost a forgotten moment in history for the Chinese. Kind of dark.

        Comment


        • #5
          To me it's the lasting memory of that revolt.

          Just this dude in the middle of a road staring down a tank.

          Comment


          • #6
            Man that was a crazy year(s). The Polish Solidarity elections happened on June 4th too that preceded the fall of the Eastern Bloc/Soviet Union. Hungary had begun dismantling their border fence with Austria in May, and of course the Berlin Wall coming down on Nov 9th.

            <object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/7z6dxQVhE8o?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/7z6dxQVhE8o?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

            I still hold out hope that one day the Chinese people will be free. And it's too bad that Russia seems to be sliding back to Soviet.

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            • #7
              I also remember about the same time there was an American hostage hung in the middle east some where...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Garcia Bronco View Post
                Anyone remember Tank Man?
                Yes Tank Man ...............
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
                  Yes Tank Man ...............
                  lol...he was doing well enough until that point.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ColoradoDarin View Post
                    Man that was a crazy year(s). The Polish Solidarity elections happened on June 4th too that preceded the fall of the Eastern Bloc/Soviet Union. Hungary had begun dismantling their border fence with Austria in May, and of course the Berlin Wall coming down on Nov 9th.

                    <object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/7z6dxQVhE8o?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/7z6dxQVhE8o?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

                    I still hold out hope that one day the Chinese people will be free. And it's too bad that Russia seems to be sliding back to Soviet.


                    They pretty much are, the government in China these days is a giant paper tiger. I know a rebellious bloggers who wrote some politically extreme/inflammatory stuff about the government, and agents did indeed come to his home and ask him to stop. After his "defiance" against repeated warnings (I think 3 or 4) they did the worst thing possible - they made him disappear for however long, i think it was around 5 years.

                    Turns out this super scary Chinese prison was actually a government hotel, my understanding is, they keep you there indefinitely unless you agree to terms to stop blogging, etc. But those are just the guys who can't get on a VPN, people who get around the firewall have little to no worries of anyone knocking down their door.

                    Another story i heard from a local, where they were building rails just outside one of the major cities when a bunch of farmers came out in protest that they weren't getting enough compensation for the mandatory sale of their land for construction. Gov blacked out the national media but local media still covered it, and word spread that the protestors got paid additional compensation (though the amount was unknown). Central parties main concern is that the word doesn't spread that those farmers got extra compensation because then everyone would be asking for the better price.

                    Mostly though the government just pays people off to keep quite these days, their primary concern is taxation; now if you don't pay them, that's when you really get in trouble. They are definitely behaving more and more like uncle sam over there. In fact, in a lot of ways, the US is way more socialist than modern China. When i was there a few summers ago, it makes you think of the US in the gilded age. Extreme capitalism, that badly needs some form of legislation.
                    Last edited by Willynowei; 06-04-2014, 01:35 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      found him. He's in Colorado

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pretty hardcore stuff. Always loved that pic. Hopefully the guy isn't 6 ft under. Most likely he is though.

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                        • #13
                          Do I ever remember that day, cost me a small fortune as I was in the middle of a large deal working with China and after that it went into the toilet.

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                          • #14
                            Please don't be fooled by the Chinese government with there talk about expanding social freedoms. Anytime there is power to be had is where corruption will grow. Leave to doubt about that.

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                            • #15
                              <iframe width="854" height="510" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Y1oy9acsboU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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