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OT: Classic Car Project

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  • Cito Pelon
    replied
    A '67 Cougar is a classic, especially a soft top. Niche kind of market for it, but valuable to somebody. I haven't seen one of those on the road for many years.

    Leave a comment:


  • kamakazi_kal
    replied
    Originally posted by Powderaddict View Post
    Nice! I like those old CT's, how far along are you on the rebuild?
    Only about 2 weeks in...... Just got it back from the powdercoating.

    It was orange and yeah I changed it, the reason we lost the superbowl IMO.

    It's now flat army green with flat black trim (rims and such)

    Leave a comment:


  • Drunken.Broncoholic2
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Bronco View Post
    Nice thing is that my Grandmother owned this thing since 1972 and drove it sparingly (50K miles total) until it was passed down to my Mom (who just left it sitting for 10 years )and now I have had it sitting for 5 years, so other than the first 4 years of this cars life I know the complete history. Not worried about body repair and bondo as it literally has the original pain job still on it. That said, who knows what the interior, engine etc... will take and I do understand it can be a money pit. My dad redid his 42 Willys jeep and it was about double the original estimate.
    That's huge then. Got lucky there

    Leave a comment:


  • crush17
    replied
    Originally posted by broncosteven View Post
    Take it to The Counting Cars guy and get some horns and skulls painted on it.

    I bet they can do it for $35k
    So cheesy, yet entertaining.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by Drunken.Broncoholic2 View Post
    Not always. You can knock on it and use magnets but you don't always know until you start sanding down the layers of primer or possible other layers of paint. It could just be a thin filler, or several inches of nasty bondo. I've seen restores that needed to be stripped just months after being restored due to faulty prep work.

    Not a good idea to lay paint down on another persons half assed repair. You'll be dealing with shrinkage and bubbles forever. Or until it's stripped.

    Nice thing is that my Grandmother owned this thing since 1972 and drove it sparingly (50K miles total) until it was passed down to my Mom (who just left it sitting for 10 years )and now I have had it sitting for 5 years, so other than the first 4 years of this cars life I know the complete history. Not worried about body repair and bondo as it literally has the original pain job still on it. That said, who knows what the interior, engine etc... will take and I do understand it can be a money pit. My dad redid his 42 Willys jeep and it was about double the original estimate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by broncosteven View Post
    Take it to The Counting Cars guy and get some horns and skulls painted on it.

    I bet they can do it for $35k
    HA, they look like they do great work, but ya, no horns and skulls for me and I don't have that type of budget.

    Sounds like it is worth it to save for a couple more years and have it done completely and right.

    Thanks for the input.

    Leave a comment:


  • broncosteven
    replied
    Take it to The Counting Cars guy and get some horns and skulls painted on it.

    I bet they can do it for $35k

    Leave a comment:


  • Powderaddict
    replied
    Originally posted by kamakazi_kal View Post
    money pit.

    I'm rebuilding a 71 Honda CT 90 and the parts are a killer to find and expensive when you do.

    proceed with caution my son.
    Nice! I like those old CT's, how far along are you on the rebuild?

    Leave a comment:


  • kamakazi_kal
    replied
    money pit.

    I'm rebuilding a 71 Honda CT 90 and the parts are a killer to find and expensive when you do.

    proceed with caution my son.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drunken.Broncoholic2
    replied
    Originally posted by Quoydogs View Post
    A cloth and magnet will find any bondo Just a little FYI
    Not always. You can knock on it and use magnets but you don't always know until you start sanding down the layers of primer or possible other layers of paint. It could just be a thin filler, or several inches of nasty bondo. I've seen restores that needed to be stripped just months after being restored due to faulty prep work.

    Not a good idea to lay paint down on another persons half assed repair. You'll be dealing with shrinkage and bubbles forever. Or until it's stripped.
    Last edited by Drunken.Broncoholic2; 02-18-2014, 02:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quoydogs
    replied
    Originally posted by Drunken.Broncoholic2 View Post
    Yep. You get what you pay for. Go cheap and it will end up costing more to fix the work that was done. No one with credible skill gives a set price on a restore. Estimates are exactly that. Once into a restore more problems pops up which is more money. It may look straight but 9 times out of 10 there's body work done underneath that paint, leading to stripping the car down to bare metal. Big bucks.
    A cloth and magnet will find any bondo Just a little FYI

    Leave a comment:


  • OBF1
    replied
    A half ass restoration including new paint, interior motor work will cost you a bit more than 5 grand. I do not know a lot about western slope paint shops but my little jeep cost 3500.00 for paint and another 2500.00 for a complete interior/carpet/stereo upgrade. Depending what motor work you need that can also hit you up for another G.

    I highly recommend if you are going to keep the car and really enjoy driving her, spend the money to get it done right the first time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drunken.Broncoholic2
    replied
    Originally posted by DENVERDUI55 View Post
    You should just sell it if you are worried about cost. It costs a fortune to do the work yourself and to have somebody else do it yeah just sell it now.

    Yes you could probably get the work you are talking about done for 5 k but then other stuff will constantly pop up. Old restores are usually just money pits. I have had a few 69 bronco, 79 CJ type vehicles.
    Yep. You get what you pay for. Go cheap and it will end up costing more to fix the work that was done. No one with credible skill gives a set price on a restore. Estimates are exactly that. Once into a restore more problems pops up which is more money. It may look straight but 9 times out of 10 there's body work done underneath that paint, leading to stripping the car down to bare metal. Big bucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • DENVERDUI55
    replied
    You should just sell it if you are worried about cost. It costs a fortune to do the work yourself and to have somebody else do it yeah just sell it now.

    Yes you could probably get the work you are talking about done for 5 k but then other stuff will constantly pop up. Old restores are usually just money pits. I have had a few 69 bronco, 79 CJ type vehicles.
    Last edited by DENVERDUI55; 02-18-2014, 02:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drunken.Broncoholic2
    replied
    It always costs a fortune when dealing with older cars.

    Leave a comment:

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