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General Baseball - 2020

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    • Just learned that Gil Hodges is not in the Hall of Fame.

      That is strange.

      Only Mel Ott and Willie Mays had more consecutive 100-RBI seasons than Hodges’ seven. He had nine fewer home runs than Tony Pérez in 2,748 fewer at-bats. He was an eight-time All-Star and won the Gold Glove the first three years it was given. He missed 2 1/2 seasons serving in the Marines during World War II, including a stint fighting on Okinawa, but still played on seven pennant winners and two World Series champions. From 1949-59, he averaged 30 HRs and 101 RBIs. From 1943-60, his 370 HRs trailed only Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, Eddie Mathews, Stan Musial and Duke Snider -- all Hall of Famers.

      Kind of an injustice to me.

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      • Originally posted by Broncoblood32 View Post
        Just learned that Gil Hodges is not in the Hall of Fame.

        That is strange.

        Only Mel Ott and Willie Mays had more consecutive 100-RBI seasons than Hodges’ seven. He had nine fewer home runs than Tony Pérez in 2,748 fewer at-bats. He was an eight-time All-Star and won the Gold Glove the first three years it was given. He missed 2 1/2 seasons serving in the Marines during World War II, including a stint fighting on Okinawa, but still played on seven pennant winners and two World Series champions. From 1949-59, he averaged 30 HRs and 101 RBIs. From 1943-60, his 370 HRs trailed only Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, Eddie Mathews, Stan Musial and Duke Snider -- all Hall of Famers.

        Kind of an injustice to me.
        Not to mention perhaps his greatest baseball achievement of all...taking the ragamuffin Mets all the way in 1969.

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        • Originally posted by Broncoblood32 View Post
          Just learned that Gil Hodges is not in the Hall of Fame.

          That is strange.

          Only Mel Ott and Willie Mays had more consecutive 100-RBI seasons than Hodges’ seven. He had nine fewer home runs than Tony Pérez in 2,748 fewer at-bats. He was an eight-time All-Star and won the Gold Glove the first three years it was given. He missed 2 1/2 seasons serving in the Marines during World War II, including a stint fighting on Okinawa, but still played on seven pennant winners and two World Series champions. From 1949-59, he averaged 30 HRs and 101 RBIs. From 1943-60, his 370 HRs trailed only Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, Eddie Mathews, Stan Musial and Duke Snider -- all Hall of Famers.

          Kind of an injustice to me.
          In Jay Jaffe's book Cooperstown Casebook, he writes that Gil Hodges got 60.1 percent of the writers' vote twice. He's the only player to cross that 60 percent threshold on the writers' ballot but not get in through the Veterans Committee process.

          Danny Peary, Hodges' biographer, claims that in 1993 that Hodges fell one vote short for election into the Hall of Fame on the Veterans Committee ballot. Ted Williams, who headed the Veterans Committee at the time, would not allow ailing member and former Dodger teammate Roy Campanella to vote by phone.

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          • Originally posted by TD4HOF View Post

            Not to mention perhaps his greatest baseball achievement of all...taking the ragamuffin Mets all the way in 1969.
            That's one of my biggest beefs is with the National Baseball Hall of Fame, it typically evaluates individuals as a player only or a manager only. The sum of contributions aren't considered.

            For instance, Joe Torre got elected into HOF as a manager and deserving so.

            But I think Torre should be recognized as a player/manager on his HOF plaque. Torre was one of the game's great catchers, as a nine-time All-Star and recipient of the 1971 NL MVP.

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            • Originally posted by balero View Post

              That's one of my biggest beefs is with the National Baseball Hall of Fame, it typically evaluates individuals as a player only or a manager only. The sum of contributions aren't considered.

              For instance, Joe Torre got elected into HOF as a manager and deserving so.

              But I think Torre should be recognized as a player/manager on his HOF plaque. Torre was one of the game's great catchers, as a nine-time All-Star and recipient of the 1971 NL MVP.
              Agreed! They also tend to ignore impact, legacy, etc. I get that it's hard to get in and you have to have #'s. But the only thing? Nah.

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              • Originally posted by TD4HOF View Post

                Agreed! They also tend to ignore impact, legacy, etc. I get that it's hard to get in and you have to have #'s. But the only thing? Nah.
                I totally agree.

                (Joe) Tinker to (Johnny) Evers to (Frank) Chance are all in the Hall. It is the Hall of "Fame".

                There's probably not a more iconic dynasty in baseball than "The Boys of Summer", "The Bums", and the Amazin' Mets are one of the most iconic single-season teams.

                I don't think Hodges' inclusion would lessen the HOF at all.

                But if you dive down deep into the stat analysis, the biggest knock on Hodges is he benefitted from hitting at Ebbets Field. Jay Jaffe in that book ranks Hodges as the 35th best first baseman of all-time.

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                              • When your nickname is the franchise's nickname, you've left quite a mark. RIP Kaline. Sheesh, when Mays and Aaron go it's gonna be the end of the glory era.

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