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Washington Post: Story of Peyton Manning's Recovery

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  • ZONA
    replied
    It was a very long article, but worth the read. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ol#7
    replied
    The longer he is here, the more I love Manning.

    Great article, great find, thanks for posting!

    Leave a comment:


  • milehighJC
    replied
    Originally posted by BowlenBall View Post
    Holy ****, is that some good writing. Required reading for all Broncos fans.

    "So these days he thinks less about throwing missiles or glamorous arcs, than about just tricking the opposition and delivering the ball to the right place. The golden boyness has faded; in its place is a man with a fighter’s face, narrow eyes and a slightly hooked nose that keeps him from being pretty, hair mowed short as a putting green, and expression closed shut, refusing to give anything away to the opponent. Defensive backs describe trying to read Manning’s face as he scans the field, nothing moving under center except his predatory eyes, “flicking back and forth,” as Eagles safety Earl Wolff says."
    Great piece... gravitated to the same quote - the robot at work. Cant wait for Sunday, time to shake off the Colts game, and enjoy watching Manning ruin Shanahan's return to Mile High (and I liked Shanahan a lot)

    Leave a comment:


  • Pick Six
    replied
    Manning may have more money than any of us will make, in our entire life. However, he has a medical backstory that most of us do not want. My respect for Manning just went through the roof...

    Leave a comment:


  • Natedogg
    replied
    Also awesome writing. This now the article of record on his rehab.

    Leave a comment:


  • Natedogg
    replied
    Attention Denver Post: These are the kind of articles you should be writing.

    There was also a pretty good one by espn on Von's interactions during his suspension which the DP writers didn't even mention at all.

    They need some new blood. Or an online only rival needs to get some access.

    Leave a comment:


  • BowlenBall
    replied
    Holy ****, is that some good writing. Required reading for all Broncos fans.

    "So these days he thinks less about throwing missiles or glamorous arcs, than about just tricking the opposition and delivering the ball to the right place. The golden boyness has faded; in its place is a man with a fighter’s face, narrow eyes and a slightly hooked nose that keeps him from being pretty, hair mowed short as a putting green, and expression closed shut, refusing to give anything away to the opponent. Defensive backs describe trying to read Manning’s face as he scans the field, nothing moving under center except his predatory eyes, “flicking back and forth,” as Eagles safety Earl Wolff says."

    Leave a comment:


  • crush17
    started a topic Washington Post: Story of Peyton Manning's Recovery

    Washington Post: Story of Peyton Manning's Recovery

    By Sally Jenkins, Published: October 21

    At first, when Peyton Manning woke up from the anesthesia, he was relieved: The pain in the neck that he had lived with for years was gone. As he came to, he stirred in the hospital bed, took stock of his misery-free condition, and started to push himself upright. Then it happened — his right arm buckled beneath him. Surprised, he struggled again to sit up, and at that moment, he understood his career was in jeopardy.

    It was May 2011, and Manning had checked into Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago for surgery on a herniated disc, a tear in the protective ring in his neck that had undermined his performance after 14 seasons with the Indianapolis Colts. The procedure was supposed to fix it, but now when he pushed himself up in bed, his right triceps was unable to bear his weight. Trying to contain his alarm, the most eminent quarterback in the NFL asked his surgeon what had happened to his arm. The surgeon explained that the disc had been pressing on a nerve. It would take some time for the irritation to subside, and for the nerve and muscle to come back alive.

    But two weeks later, Manning’s arm still felt weak. By this time he noticed that the grip strength in his hand also appeared to be affected. “If any other part of your body has some weakness you go, ‘Well I can probably manage,’” Manning says. “But when you’re a quarterback and it’s your right hand, you’re certainly concerned far as being able to do your job.” His doctors discovered that he had re-herniated the disc, and Manning returned to the hospital for a second surgery, this one in virtual secrecy.

    While he waited to heal, Manning largely disappeared from public view, unwilling to let anyone see his arm in such feeble condition. “I wasn’t just going to throw with anybody around watching,” he says. “I was guarded and protective.” The NFL was in the midst of a four-month labor lockout, which meant he couldn’t use the Colts’ facilities or trainers, so he looked for a place to rehab unobserved. His old college friend Todd Helton, then a first baseman with the Colorado Rockies, suggested he come out to Denver where he could work out secretly and get treatment from the Rockies’ trainers, who were accustomed to dealing with arms.

    The first pass Manning threw post-surgery was to Helton, and they were so concerned with privacy that they went to an underground batting cage beneath the Rockies’ stadium. Helton took up a position about 10 yards away and held out his hands. Manning reared back, and threw.

    “The ball nose-dived after about five yards,” Manning says.

    It didn’t even make it halfway to Helton before it hit the ground. Helton burst out laughing — he thought Manning was joking.

    “C’mon, quit kidding,” he said.

    “Man, I wish I was,” Manning said

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports...c3e_print.html
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