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  • Police Search of Cellphones During Arrests

    Justices split on whether police can search cellphones during arrests


    WASHINGTON — Confronting a right-to-privacy question in the new world of smartphones, the Supreme Court justices sounded closely split Tuesday on whether police officers should be free to search through the phone of any person who is arrested.

    Justice Elena Kagan, the newest and youngest member of the high court, urged her colleagues to insist on protecting privacy.

    “People carry their entire lives on their cellphone,” she said during the argument involving a San Diego case. If there are no limits, a police officer could stop a motorist for not having seat belt buckled and download a huge amount of information, looking for some evidence of wrongdoing, she warned.

    Such a search could include “every single email, all their bank records, all their medical records,” she said, as well as GPS data that would show everywhere they had traveled recently.

    But Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. pressed the opposite view. Police who make an arrest have always been permitted to check a wallet, a billfold or a purse, and that might include personal photos.

    “What’s the difference if the photos are in a billfold or on smartphone?” he asked. The smartphone may include more, but “I don’t see there’s much difference,” he said.

    http://www.latimes.com/nation/nation...#axzz30JV8TNjO

  • #2
    Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
    Justices split on whether police can search cellphones during arrests


    WASHINGTON — Confronting a right-to-privacy question in the new world of smartphones, the Supreme Court justices sounded closely split Tuesday on whether police officers should be free to search through the phone of any person who is arrested.

    Justice Elena Kagan, the newest and youngest member of the high court, urged her colleagues to insist on protecting privacy.

    “People carry their entire lives on their cellphone,” she said during the argument involving a San Diego case. If there are no limits, a police officer could stop a motorist for not having seat belt buckled and download a huge amount of information, looking for some evidence of wrongdoing, she warned.

    Such a search could include “every single email, all their bank records, all their medical records,” she said, as well as GPS data that would show everywhere they had traveled recently.

    But Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. pressed the opposite view. Police who make an arrest have always been permitted to check a wallet, a billfold or a purse, and that might include personal photos.

    “What’s the difference if the photos are in a billfold or on smartphone?” he asked. The smartphone may include more, but “I don’t see there’s much difference,” he said.

    http://www.latimes.com/nation/nation...#axzz30JV8TNjO
    Lets just hope Alito doesn't write the majority opinion requiring all of us to get bar code tattoos on our forehead so the police can scan them for info

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
      Justices split on whether police can search cellphones during arrests


      WASHINGTON — Confronting a right-to-privacy question in the new world of smartphones, the Supreme Court justices sounded closely split Tuesday on whether police officers should be free to search through the phone of any person who is arrested.

      Justice Elena Kagan, the newest and youngest member of the high court, urged her colleagues to insist on protecting privacy.

      “People carry their entire lives on their cellphone,” she said during the argument involving a San Diego case. If there are no limits, a police officer could stop a motorist for not having seat belt buckled and download a huge amount of information, looking for some evidence of wrongdoing, she warned.

      Such a search could include “every single email, all their bank records, all their medical records,” she said, as well as GPS data that would show everywhere they had traveled recently.

      But Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. pressed the opposite view. Police who make an arrest have always been permitted to check a wallet, a billfold or a purse, and that might include personal photos.

      “What’s the difference if the photos are in a billfold or on smartphone?” he asked. The smartphone may include more, but “I don’t see there’s much difference,” he said.

      http://www.latimes.com/nation/nation...#axzz30JV8TNjO
      IMO, Alito is the biggest moron to ever set foot on the court. Some of the stuff that comes out of his mouth is actually astonishing. He reminds me of that Brendan Fraser character in Blast From the Past where he's been kept in a bomb shelter for 35 years by his dad (Christopher Walken) and then he comes out and tries to live in the world, but has no clue what the **** is going on.

      Comment


      • #4
        Nobody gives a shiat that you have to submit to a sexual molestation in order to prove you aren't a cleverly disguised bomb prior to flying. Why would this matter? Whatever you do, don't fondle my iPhone. Molest grandma and my children, just please don't violate my phone.

        Comment


        • #5
          Opens so many doors for abuse of power …… but would we expect anything else.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            I have faith that Scalia will come down on the side of privacy, which he has in the past.

            If not I will disagree with the decision.

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