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Paid What You're Worth is BS

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  • Paid What You're Worth is BS

    And we laugh and call Russia a mobocracy. Look at the racket we are running. We're no more than an overstuffed banana republic.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert...b_4964290.html

  • #2
    This about sums up the major problem with our economy:

    Fifty years ago, when General Motors was the largest employer in America, the typical GM worker got paid $35 an hour in today's dollars. Today, America's largest employer is Walmart, and the typical Walmart worker earns $8.80 an hour.

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    • #3
      This also makes one's head spin. Or, at least it does if one's head isn't up one's backside...

      ...the lion's share of that subsidy ($64 billion a year) goes to the top five banks -- JPMorgan, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo. and Goldman Sachs. This amount just about equals these banks' typical annual profits. In other words, take away the subsidy and not only does the bonus pool disappear, but so do all the profits.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rohirrim View Post
        And we laugh and call Russia a mobocracy. Look at the racket we are running. We're no more than an overstuffed banana republic.

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert...b_4964290.html
        Yep..... Billionaires own this country and everyone in it.

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        • #5
          "Paid what you're worth" is a loose and maybe unfortunate euphemism.

          When you take your car to get fixed, you don't literally pay what it's worth to you to have your car running.

          You pay what you think is (close to) the lowest price you can for a competent repair. Or you even make a value decision on whether to do it yourself or not.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BroncoBeavis View Post
            "Paid what you're worth" is a loose and maybe unfortunate euphemism.

            When you take your car to get fixed, you don't literally pay what it's worth to you to have your car running.

            You pay what you think is (close to) the lowest price you can for a competent repair. Or you even make a value decision on whether to do it yourself or not.
            So using that analogy Wal-Mart pays their employees the absolute lowest amount they possibly can get a way with, even if they have to spend millions lobbying Congress and supporting politicians that promise to keep wages low.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Guess Who View Post
              So using that analogy Wal-Mart pays their employees the absolute lowest amount they possibly can get a way with, even if they have to spend millions lobbying Congress and supporting politicians that promise to keep wages low.
              They pay as little as they can for people competent enough to do the work they need done. If they can't find those people at that price, they raise their offer (wage)

              The crazy talk about politicians having control over real wages is your own.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TonyR View Post
                This about sums up the major problem with our economy:
                Its our obsessive love affair with "Cheap", along with the easy of imported junk that have kicked America in the nads.

                I think you will see the tide turn though in the next few decades. In time it will be more competetive to produce here again, and more jobs will be created to make I-Pads and other stuff here.

                Globalization and Global Competition have really hurt the Average to Poor American...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Guess Who View Post
                  So using that analogy Wal-Mart pays their employees the absolute lowest amount they possibly can get a way with, even if they have to spend millions lobbying Congress and supporting politicians that promise to keep wages low.
                  You mean lobbying congress and supporting politicians at the federal, state and local area that continue to allow Wal Mart and others to subsidize their private profits with public funds by enabling the abuse of workers who, without public assistance, could not and would not work for abusers like Wal Mart.

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                  • #10
                    If the government stopped subsidizing corporations tomorrow, the entire economic landscape would change, and quickly too.

                    Legislation is now making its way through the California legislature—with the support of consumer groups, unions and, interestingly, physicians—that would levy a fine of up to $6,000 on employers like Wal-Mart for every full-time employee that ends up on the state’s Medi-Cal program—the California incarnation of Medicaid.

                    The amount of the fine is no coincidence.

                    A report released last week by the Democratic staff of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce, estimates that the cost of Wal-Mart’s failure to adequately pay its employees could total about $5,815 per employee each and every year of employment.


                    “Accurate and timely data on Wal-Mart’s wage and employment practices is not always readily available. However, occasional releases of demographic data from public assistance programs can provide useful windows into the scope of taxpayer subsidization of Wal-Mart. After analyzing data released by Wisconsin’s Medicaid program, the Democratic staff of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce estimates that a single 300- person Wal-Mart Supercenter store in Wisconsin likely costs taxpayers at least $904,542 per year and could cost taxpayers up to $1,744,590 per year – about $5,815 per employee.”
                    http://www.forbes.com/sites/rickunga...ofits-for-you/

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                    • #11
                      We should have let big banks fail. They don't loan money out to middle class and poor in large amounts anyways.

                      We got hosed.

                      I don't agree Walmart can be compared to building cars but whatever.

                      The people working at Walmart are not skilled like auto workers back in the day, or today. Go find out what people in the 50's made working at the corner drug store. That is a better gauge of Walmart.

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                      • #12
                        So the real problem is too many stupid people who are only skilled enough to work at Walmart. Or an economy where the good jobs dry up and college graduates have to go work at Walmart.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rohirrim View Post
                          If the government stopped subsidizing corporations tomorrow, the entire economic landscape would change, and quickly too.

                          Legislation is now making its way through the California legislature—with the support of consumer groups, unions and, interestingly, physicians—that would levy a fine of up to $6,000 on employers like Wal-Mart for every full-time employee that ends up on the state’s Medi-Cal program—the California incarnation of Medicaid.

                          The amount of the fine is no coincidence.

                          A report released last week by the Democratic staff of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce, estimates that the cost of Wal-Mart’s failure to adequately pay its employees could total about $5,815 per employee each and every year of employment.


                          “Accurate and timely data on Wal-Mart’s wage and employment practices is not always readily available. However, occasional releases of demographic data from public assistance programs can provide useful windows into the scope of taxpayer subsidization of Wal-Mart. After analyzing data released by Wisconsin’s Medicaid program, the Democratic staff of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce estimates that a single 300- person Wal-Mart Supercenter store in Wisconsin likely costs taxpayers at least $904,542 per year and could cost taxpayers up to $1,744,590 per year – about $5,815 per employee.”
                          http://www.forbes.com/sites/rickunga...ofits-for-you/
                          They will just fire all the full time workers and go all part time. Don't people see that? You can't force Walmart. Most of those people would be without jobs if not for companies like walmart. Why don't you all go hire some of them and pay them 15 bucks an hour?

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                          • #14
                            Rho if you owned a small retail shop selling widgets how much per hour would you pay employees if they job was so easy you could be trained to do it in 1 week. Also you have plenty of workforce to choose from. You could fire people and have a new employee who is just as good within hours.

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                            • #15
                              I bet Walmarts have a stack of applications to choose from. All the people the liberals have left behind.

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