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Jolly wins Fla. congressional race

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  • Jolly wins Fla. congressional race

    Republican David Jolly defeated Democrat Alex Sink on Tuesday in a Tampa-area House district where President Barack Obama's health care overhaul got its first test ahead of November's midterm elections and both sides spent millions auditioning national strategies.

    The implications of the dueling messages for the midterm elections inspired both parties to call in star advocates like former President Bill Clinton and former vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan, in addition to blanketing the district with ads, calls and mailings. More than $11 million has been spent on the race, according to the Sunlight Foundation, a nonprofit group that tracks government information.

    http://apnews.myway.com/article/20140312/DACFR78G0.html

    FLASHBACK: Race Dems Can't Afford to Lose...

    It’s rare in politics that anything other than a presidential contest is viewed as a “must win” — but the special election in Florida’s 13th District falls into that category for Democrats.

    A loss in the competitive March 11 contest would almost certainly be regarded by dispassionate observers as a sign that President Barack Obama could constitute an albatross around the neck of his party’s nominees in November. And that could make it more difficult for Democratic candidates, campaign committees and interest groups to raise money and energize the grass roots.

    http://www3.blogs.rollcall.com/rothe...fford-to-lose/

  • #2
    Obama already knows he can't get the House. His biggest nightmare would be losing the Senate.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by cutthemdown View Post
      Obama already knows he can't get the House. His biggest nightmare would be losing the Senate.
      The Dems brought in the big gun (Bill Clinton) and spent a ton of money on this race, they really wanted to make a statement but got "b**** slapped" and sent home with their tail tucked between their legs.

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      • #4
        I live in this district. The problems, as I see them, were two fold.

        - Alex Sink is not a very strong candidate and ran a poor campaign (a mistake she made in her run for governor).

        - Many people, including some Democrats, were not happy about the notion that Sink only moved to the area to further her political career.

        If the Democrats want to win this seat, they're best bet is to find a stronger candidate (and there are options) that could take it during the regular election in the fall.

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        • #5
          yay. the lobbyist won..

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          • #6
            This district has been under republican control for 31 yrs. all of the sudden it's a statement on Obamacare.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by peacepipe View Post
              This district has been under republican control for 31 yrs. all of the sudden it's a statement on Obamacare.
              BO carried the district in both elections and the Dems wanted this election to show support for him and Obamacare. Why would they spend that much time and money on a district that was a lock for the republicans?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pony Boy View Post
                BO carried the district in both elections and the Dems wanted this election to show support for him and Obamacare. Why would they spend that much time and money on a district that was a lock for the republicans?
                Yet somehow for the last 30 plus years they vote rethug to represent their district.

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                • #9
                  It's not a good sign for Obama but this district isn't a liberal area so not really a crushing defeat.

                  That comes in the midterms.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cutthemdown View Post
                    It's not a good sign for Obama but this district isn't a liberal area so not really a crushing defeat.

                    That comes in the midterms.
                    Yep, as long as they keep making these types of comments to rebrand their image....


                    Ryan's 'inner city' comments sparking backlash

                    Washington (CNN) - Rep. Paul Ryan is receiving some serious heat for comments he made on a conservative radio program where the Republican from Wisconsin said there’s “a real culture problem” in inner cities and pointed to the work of a controversial author who believes black people are less intelligent than whites.

                    On Bill Bennett’s Morning in America program Wednesday, Ryan, who has become involved in the issue of poverty over the last year and a half, told Bennett there is a “tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work.”

                    “So there’s a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with,” added the House Budget Committee chairman and 2012 GOP vice presidential nominee.

                    In the radio interview, Ryan also referenced conservative author, American Enterprise Institute scholar, and self-described “right-wing ideologue,” Charles Murray, who wrote the controversial book “The Bell Curve,” which claims that black people have inferior intelligence and is the reason for social disadvantages.

                    “You’re buddy Charles Murray or Bob Putnam over at Harvard – those guys have written books on this, which is – we have got this tailspin of culture,” Ryan said.

                    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s office sent out an alert to reporters, calling his statements “shameful and wrong.”

                    Representative Barbara Lee of California took offense to Ryan’s statement. She put out a news release that said, “My colleague Congressman Ryan’s comments about ‘inner city’ poverty are a thinly veiled racial attack and cannot be tolerated. Let’s be clear, when Mr. Ryan says ‘inner city,’ when he says, ‘culture,’ these are simply code words for what he really means: ‘black.’”

                    “Mr. Ryan should step up and produce some legitimate proposals on how to tackle poverty and racial discrimination in America,” Lee added.

                    Ryan’s remarks come a week after he released a report on poverty, where he analyzed 92 federal anti-poverty programs, concluding that are a confusing patchwork of often ineffective prescriptions to combating policy.

                    On Bennett’s radio program, Ryan, who's considering a bid for the 2016 GOP nomination, said beating poverty is not the job of government and called on people “to get involved” through non-profits or religious charities.

                    Ryan has embarked on a series of listening and learning tours of inner city poverty with Bob Woodson, the head of the Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, an organization that works with people on the outskirts of society.

                    Woodson, who is a former scholar at AEI, said Paul needs to stop listening to conservative scholars on the issue of poverty because their rhetoric “seeps into his speeches.”

                    “The only thing they are passionate about is the failures of the poor,” Woodson said, adding that Ryan should instead tell the stories of the people he’s met in the past year.

                    Ryan’s remarks come a week after he released a report on poverty, where he analyzed 92 federal anti-poverty programs, concluding that are a confusing patchwork of often ineffective prescriptions to combating policy.

                    On Bennett’s radio program, Ryan, who's considering a bid for the 2016 GOP nomination, said beating poverty is not the job of government and called on people “to get involved” through non-profits or religious charities.

                    In an interview with CNN in December, Woodson applauded Ryan’s effort because he “needs to understand what the needs are” before he talks about and addresses the issue of poverty.

                    In Ryan's Wednesday radio interview, he discussed some of the same issues that President Barack Obama brought up late last month at an event at the White House, where he announced "My Brother's Keeper" - a new initiative to help minority young men and boys succeed.

                    "No excuses. Government, and private sector, and philanthropy, and all the faith communities, we all have a responsibility to help provide you the tools you need. We've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience," the President said. "But you've got responsibilities too."

                    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com...ash/?hpt=hp_t2

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Keep the votes coming crazies

                      Michele Bachmann: Gays 'bullied' Americans, politicians over Arizona bill

                      Upset with last month's veto of Arizona SB 1062 by Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) said on a conservative talk show last week that the gay community thinks it is "bullying" the American people and politicians.

                      Appearing on The Lars Larson Show, Bachmann said the bill, which if passed would have allowed businesses to refuse service to gay and lesbian people by citing religious beliefs, had nothing to do with gays.

                      The thing that I think that is getting a little tiresome is, the gay community thinks that they've so bullied the American people and they so intimidated politicians that politicians fear them, and so they think that they get to dictate the agenda everywhere," Bachmann said.

                      Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/poli...#ixzz2vrReo9Xb

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wonder how many retirees live in Tampa? Eh?

                        This is what the Republicans have to look forward to.

                        Demographically, Republicans remain overwhelmingly white and their average age now approaches 50. Fully 87% of Republicans are non-Hispanic whites, a figure which has changed little since 2000.

                        In contrast to Republicans, Democrats have grown increasingly diverse. A narrow majority of Democrats (55%) are non-Hispanic whites, down from 64% in 2000. As in recent years, most Democrats are women (59%). And while the average age of self-described Democrats has risen since 2008 – from 46.9 to 47.7 – Democrats continue to be younger than Republicans on average (47.7 vs. 49.7).

                        http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...ew-values.html

                        We will go social democratic. It's only a matter of time. The greed ethos will die off. The brutality of capitalism and income inequality will kill it. And those who believe in the Fox News bull**** will fade away, as will Fox.

                        One thing you can always count on, **** changes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As you get older you always get more conservative.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cutthemdown View Post
                            As you get older you always get more conservative.
                            Conservative and radical Right are two different things. You guys just can't seem to understand that.

                            One thing about the historical pendulum, once it has swung too far in one direction, you can always count on it to swing back.

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                            • #15
                              I agree things swing back and forth. Radical right is just liberal propaganda to try and stay in power. There is no radical right. What's radical about small govt and low taxes?

                              I will agree the religious component gets carried away but voter ID is not really radical. It's just conservatives can't stand things like dead people voting.

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