The Orange Mane -  a Denver Broncos Fan Community  

Go Back   The Orange Mane - a Denver Broncos Fan Community > Orange Mane Discussion > Orange Mane Central Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Chat Room Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-26-2009, 09:09 PM   #1
Sassy
Ring of Famer
 
Sassy's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2001
Location: ND
Posts: 37,667

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Eddie Royal
Default For those complaining about the price of gas!

The U. S. Geological Service issued a report in April ('08) that only scientists and oil men knew was coming, but man was it big. It was a revised report (hadn't been updated since '95) on how much oil was in this area of the western 2/3 of North Dakota ; western South Dakota ; and extreme eastern Montana .... check THIS out:

The Bakken is the largest domestic oil discovery since Alaska 's Prudhoe Bay , and has the potential to eliminate all American dependence on foreign oil. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates it at 503 billion barrels. Even if just 10% of the oil is recoverable... at $107 a barrel, we're looking at a resource base worth more than $5.3 trillion.

'When I first briefed legislators on this, you could practically see their jaws hit the floor. They had no idea..' says Terry Johnson, the Montana Legislature's financial analyst.

'This sizable find is now the highest-producing onshore oil field found in the past 56 years' reports, The Pittsburgh Post Gazette. It's a formation known as the Williston Basin , but is more commonly referred to as the 'Bakken.' And it stretches from Northern Montana, through North Dakota and into Canada . For years, U. S. oil exploration has been considered a dead end. Even the 'Big Oil' companies gave up searching for major oil wells decades ago. However, a recent technological breakthrough has opened up the Bakken's massive reserves.... and we now have access of up to 500 billion barrels. And because this is light, sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL!

That's enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years straight.

2. And if THAT didn't throw you on the floor, then this next one should - because it's from TWO YEARS AGO!

U. S. Oil Discovery- Largest Reserve in the World!
Stansberry Report Online - 4/20/2006

Hidden 1,000 feet beneath the surface of the Rocky Mountains lies the largest untapped oil reserve in the world. It is more than 2 TRILLION barrels. On August 8, 2005 President Bush mandated its extraction. In three and a half years of high oil prices none has been extracted. With this motherload of oil why are we still fighting over off-shore drilling?

They reported this stunning news: We have more oil inside our borders, than all the other proven reserves on earth. Here are the official estimates:

- 8-times as much oil as Saudi Arabia
- 18-times as much oil as Iraq
- 21-times as much oil as Kuwait
- 22-times as much oil as Iran
- 500-times as much oil as Yemen
- and it's all right here in the Western United States .

HOW can this BE? HOW can we NOT BE extracting this? Because the environmentalists and others have blocked all efforts to help America become independent of foreign oil! Again, we are letting a small group of people dictate our lives and our economy.....WHY?

James Bartis, lead researcher with the study says we've got more oil in this very compact area than the entire Middle East -more than 2 TRILLION barrels untapped. That's more than all the proven oil reserves of crude oil in the world today, reports The Denver Post..

Don't think 'OPEC' will drop its price - even with this find? Think again! It's all about the competitive marketplace, - it has to. Think OPEC just might be funding the environmentalists?


Got your attention/ire up yet? Hope so! Now, while you're thinking about it .... and hopefully P.O'd, do this:

3. Pass this along. If you don't take a little time to do this, then you should stifle yourself the next time you want to complain about gas prices--- because by doing NOTHING, you've forfeited your right to complain



By the way...this is all true. Check it out at the link below!!!
GOOGLE it or follow this link. It will blow your mind.
http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 10-26-2009, 09:18 PM   #2
Lev Vyvanse
Ring of Famer
 
Lev Vyvanse's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 3,048
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
That's enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years straight.
Holy crap!! Almost sounds like its to good to be true. Two millenia worth of oil.
Lev Vyvanse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:19 PM   #3
bronco610
OLD FART
 
bronco610's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Keller, TX
Posts: 1,839

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Woodyard
Default

Doesn't suprise me in the least. Our political corectness in the enviornmental issues will end up being the end of us all. Do you think the mid-east, china, or india is worried about the enviornment as we ship all our manufacturing and jobs over there?
bronco610 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:24 PM   #4
broncocalijohn
Famer of Rings
 
broncocalijohn's Avatar
 
I said Do It!

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lake Forest, Orange County, Calif.
Posts: 21,604

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Simon Fletcher
Default

we arent getting to it. You really think the environmentalist lobbying for electric cars and/or hybrids going to let us tap into this fuel? Good luck. Nothing wrong with finding the best alternative methods of fuel but when it is right underneath our own soil in the 48 states, then it should be used accordingly. See above what accordingly is to some though.
broncocalijohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:25 PM   #5
scorpio
Cubicle Pimp
 
scorpio's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,500
Default

Thanks grandma.
scorpio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:25 PM   #6
WyoLaw
Pheasant Tail
 
WyoLaw's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 481
Default

Just try getting a motel room for a full week in Williston, ND. Damn near impossible. Half the time I have to drive from Watford City when I work in Williston and the other half I have to drive from Williston when I work in Watford City. It's terribly annoying.
WyoLaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:27 PM   #7
Sassy
Ring of Famer
 
Sassy's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2001
Location: ND
Posts: 37,667

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Eddie Royal
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpio View Post
Thanks grandma.
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:33 PM   #8
houghtam
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 6,396
Default

The environmentalists aren't pissed that we're getting oil from different countries, they're pissed that we're using oil at all.

Why tap an unused resource to save money over the short term, when health care costs due to poor environment and pollution on account of burning (unrenewable, btw) fossil fuels rise?

Have fun saving that $1 a gallon on gas. I'd rather not have to spend $50,000 on end-of-life cancer costs due to inhaling toxicants.
houghtam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:39 PM   #9
SureShot
Hurry! Hurry!
 
SureShot's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 5,947

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Matt Russell
Default

Great a political thread. Yay!
SureShot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:43 PM   #10
Lev Vyvanse
Ring of Famer
 
Lev Vyvanse's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 3,048
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
Back in my day people wouldn't question their elders. We also didnít have to ask some hippy group to get our oil. Whenever anyone found oil we would just gouge out a big hole and everyone would come running with their buckets. Thatís the way it was and we liked it.
Lev Vyvanse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:46 PM   #11
broncocalijohn
Famer of Rings
 
broncocalijohn's Avatar
 
I said Do It!

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lake Forest, Orange County, Calif.
Posts: 21,604

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Simon Fletcher
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by houghtam View Post
The environmentalists aren't pissed that we're getting oil from different countries, they're pissed that we're using oil at all.

Why tap an unused resource to save money over the short term, when health care costs due to poor environment and pollution on account of burning (unrenewable, btw) fossil fuels rise?

Have fun saving that $1 a gallon on gas. I'd rather not have to spend $50,000 on end-of-life cancer costs due to inhaling toxicants.
we have been using this type of fuel for well over a century so I dont see the outbreak of cancer happening based on that. I will take that $1 (at least) spread out over my lifetime. What is the difference of using that oil and using the oil we get from other countries? Short term? There is oil there for centuries. If we find a different type of fuel or resource to power vehicles, that oil will still be there. Not sure what your approach is here.
broncocalijohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:49 PM   #12
Pony Boy
"Whoa Nellie"
 
Pony Boy's Avatar
 
Omaha !!!

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 7,583

Adopt-a-Bronco:
mellon head
Default

Is it oil or oil shale, that makes a big difference. Extracting oil from shale is no simple task, which is why the reserves in Colorado remain almost completely undeveloped.
Pony Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:49 PM   #13
CHANGSTER
You are a pizza burn...
 
CHANGSTER's Avatar
 
on the roof of the world's mouth

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SD
Posts: 1,531
Default

This really grinds my gears.
CHANGSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:56 PM   #14
broncocalijohn
Famer of Rings
 
broncocalijohn's Avatar
 
I said Do It!

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lake Forest, Orange County, Calif.
Posts: 21,604

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Simon Fletcher
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGSTER View Post
This really grinds my gears.
a little oil will fix that problem on your gears.
broncocalijohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:56 PM   #15
SureShot
Hurry! Hurry!
 
SureShot's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 5,947

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Matt Russell
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by houghtam View Post
The environmentalists aren't pissed that we're getting oil from different countries, they're pissed that we're using oil at all.

Why tap an unused resource to save money over the short term, when health care costs due to poor environment and pollution on account of burning (unrenewable, btw) fossil fuels rise?

Have fun saving that $1 a gallon on gas. I'd rather not have to spend $50,000 on end-of-life cancer costs due to inhaling toxicants.
SureShot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 09:58 PM   #16
Que
Gettin' some
 
Que's Avatar
 
Just the tip

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crested Butte, CO
Posts: 1,239
Default

Sassy - just a suggestion but you might want to check Snopes or some of the other urban legend sites before cross posting stuff that comes in your inbox. There is some truth here but not much. I could make an even more Golly Gee email with oil shale and even oil sands. Heck, I could make you want to invade Canada for their sands. But with everything, there is reality...

http://www.snopes.com/politics/gasoline/bakken.asp
Que is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:00 PM   #17
bronco610
OLD FART
 
bronco610's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Keller, TX
Posts: 1,839

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Woodyard
Default

And while we argue and legislate these issues we remain dependent on other countries. Shame
bronco610 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:04 PM   #18
Pony Boy
"Whoa Nellie"
 
Pony Boy's Avatar
 
Omaha !!!

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 7,583

Adopt-a-Bronco:
mellon head
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post
Sassy - just a suggestion but you might want to check Snopes or some of the other urban legend sites before cross posting stuff that comes in your inbox. There is some truth here but not much. I could make an even more Golly Gee email with oil shale and even oil sands. Heck, I could make you want to invade Canada for their sands. But with everything, there is reality...

http://www.snopes.com/politics/gasoline/bakken.asp
Ouch !! We've been oil-party pooped
Pony Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:05 PM   #19
TheDave
Sauced...
 
TheDave's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 14,999
Default

TheDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:08 PM   #20
~Crash~
My new dog
 

Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,579

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Kuper
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by houghtam View Post
The environmentalists aren't pissed that we're getting oil from different countries, they're pissed that we're using oil at all.

Why tap an unused resource to save money over the short term, when health care costs due to poor environment and pollution on account of burning (unrenewable, btw) fossil fuels rise?

Have fun saving that $1 a gallon on gas. I'd rather not have to spend $50,000 on end-of-life cancer costs due to inhaling toxicants.
tell that to my dad that has 3 or 4 years left to see .All he wanted to do is travel around the USA and see the sights but to costly for him .
~Crash~ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:10 PM   #21
Boobs McGee
I promise to stay alive
 
Boobs McGee's Avatar
 
till the day that I die

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Glendale
Posts: 5,002

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Matty P
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pony Boy View Post
Is it oil or oil shale, that makes a big difference. Extracting oil from shale is no simple task, which is why the reserves in Colorado remain almost completely undeveloped.
That's exactly what I was thinking. Pretty sure it's shale...and you're absolutely correct, they haven't come up with an efficient way to extract it yet.

I'll do some research
Boobs McGee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:14 PM   #22
Que
Gettin' some
 
Que's Avatar
 
Just the tip

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crested Butte, CO
Posts: 1,239
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bronconia View Post
That's exactly what I was thinking. Pretty sure it's shale...and you're absolutely correct, they haven't come up with an efficient way to extract it yet.

I'll do some research
Sweet. Please let us know when you get that whole oil shale to oil thing figgered out! Sorry, couldn't resist.
Que is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:19 PM   #23
Sassy
Ring of Famer
 
Sassy's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2001
Location: ND
Posts: 37,667

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Eddie Royal
Default

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/3868
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:20 PM   #24
Sassy
Ring of Famer
 
Sassy's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2001
Location: ND
Posts: 37,667

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Eddie Royal
Default

http://science.howstuffworks.com/oil-shale1.htm


Oil Shale Extraction
The process of extracting liquid crude oil from the ground is comparatively simple to extracting oil shale. Pressure from gases trapped in the chamber where oil is present force the crude oil to the surface. After this pressure is alleviated, the more difficult secondary and tertiary phases of oil drilling begin. In some cases, water may be pumped in to loosen compressed oil. Sometimes gasses are introduced to repressurize the oil chamber. And in many cases, the remaining oil is simply left for future drilling with more advanced equipment.

Getting crude oil from rock represents perhaps the most difficult process of extraction. Oil shale must be mined using either underground- or surface-mining methods. After excavation, the oil shale must undergo retorting. This is when the mined rock is exposed to the process of pyrolysis -- applying extreme heat without the presence of oxygen to a substance, and producing a chemical change. Between 650 and 700 degrees Fahrenheit, the kerogen -- the fossil fuel trapped within -- begins to liquefy and separate from the rock [source: Argonne National Laboratory]. The oil-like substance that emerges can be further refined into a synthetic crude oil. When oil shale is mined and retorted above ground, the process is called surface retorting.

The problem is that this process adds two extra steps to the conventional extraction process in which liquid oil is simply pumped from the ground. In addition to mining, there's also retorting and refining of the kerogen into synthetic crude. Oil shale presents environmental challenges as well. It takes two barrels of water to produce one barrel of oil shale liquid [source: Argonne National Laboratory]. And without cutting-edge water treatment technology, the water discharge from oil shale refining will increase salinity in surrounding water, poisoning the local area [source: RAND].

There's also the matter of the rocks. Every barrel of oil produced from shale leaves behind about 1.2 to 1.5 tons of rock [source: RAND]. What should be done with this remaining rock? There are certainly projects that require loose rock -- like covering ground beneath highway overpasses to discourage homeless settlements. But the demand may not meet the supply if oil shale production is ever conducted on a massive scale.

Royal Dutch Shell Oil Company has come up with an answer to some of the problems with oil shale refining. The company calls it In Situ Conversion Process (ICP) [source: Fortune]. In ICP, the rock remains where it is; it's never excavated from the site. Instead, holes are drilled into an oil shale reserve, and heaters are lowered into the earth. Over the course of two or more years, the shale is slowly heated and the kerogen seeps out. It's collected on-site and pumped to the surface. This cuts out the mining aspect, and further reduces costs since there's no need to transport or dispose of spent rock.

Shell's design includes a freeze wall -- essentially, a barrier around the oil shale site where cooled liquids are pumped into the ground. This freezes any groundwater that may enter the site and keeps harmful byproducts like hydrocarbons from seeping out [source: Argonne National Laboratory].

Because of current obstacles, oil shale hasn't been commercially produced on a large scale. Simply put, it's currently more expensive and environmentally harmful than conventional drilling. But as the supply of crude oil diminishes and the price of petroleum rises, oil shale -- especially under Shell's plan -- is becoming increasingly attractive. Read about some of the positive and negative global consequences of emerging oil shale production on the next page.

Last edited by Sassy; 10-26-2009 at 10:24 PM..
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 10:26 PM   #25
Sassy
Ring of Famer
 
Sassy's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2001
Location: ND
Posts: 37,667

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Eddie Royal
Default

The Geopolitical Consequences of Oil Shale
In the face of a major oil crisis in the 1970s, the Jimmy Carter administration federally funded oil shale research. But when the price of oil dropped once more, interest in unconventional supplies waned [source: Fortune]. With oil at prices higher than anytime in history -- the wholesale price of oil per barrel is predicted to rise as high as $150 per barrel in 2008 -- oil shale is attractive once again [source: NPR].


This holds true especially in the United States. The largest oil shale reserve in the world happens to be located in the western part of the country, covering parts of Wyoming, Utah and Colorado. This 17,000-square-mile deposit is called the Green River Formation [source: DOE]. And if crude oil can be produced from oil shale on a large scale, the U.S. could become the leader in unconventional oil reserves.

That's because the reserves found in the Green River Formation can produce an estimated 1.5 to 1.8 trillion barrels of crude oil [source: RAND]. This is three times more than the oil reserves Saudi Arabia currently holds. This amount could meet the United States' current oil demands for about 400 years [source: Argonne National Laboratory]. In actuality, this prolonged supply is due to a lesser pace of depletion than conventional reserves and the slower rate at which the kerogen could be extracted from shale. Some estimates place peak production of oil from the U.S.'s shale reserves at 5 million barrels per day at most. This isn't enough to meet the daily U.S. demand of 21 million barrels, just under 10 million of which are imported [source: Fortune].


But cutting foreign-imported oil by half would go a long way to making the U.S. less oil-dependent. In January 2008, the U.S. imported an average of about 3.8 million barrels per day from Venezuela, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia combined [source: EIA]. While U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia are friendly, the relationship between Venezuela and the United States is rife with tense political friction. And Nigeria is a politically unstable country; its oil supplies are under constant threat from rebel factions. These rebel groups resent foreign oil companies who, the groups claim, give little in compensation for the resources they take from the nation. Commercial oil shale production could protect the U.S. from threats to its energy supply posed by these countries.


Venezuela also demonstrates another aspect of commercial oil shale production in the United States: money, and lots of it. The oil shale deposits in the U.S. are largely situated under lands controlled by the federal government. Other countries, like Venezuela, have state-owned oil conglomerates; perhaps the U.S. will dabble in socialist energy policy in the future. The price is certainly right -- Venezuela's state oil company posted revenues of $10.7 billion in the first three months of 2007. This represented a 10 percent decline in Venezuela's revenue over the same quarter of 2006 [source: AP]. Similarly, Vietnam's national PetroVietnam oil company reported earnings of $4.8 billion for the first quarter of 2008 [source: Viet Nam News].


These represent a drop in the bucket compared to the $2.5 trillion the U.S. government collected in taxes in 2007 [source: Tax Policy Center]. Still, every little billion helps.
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:27 AM.


Denver Broncos