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Old 07-01-2009, 01:59 AM   #1
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Default Homeschooling: thoughts anyone?

Anyone here home school or was home schooled growing up?

Thoughts, opinions, stories, advise...

We're going to explore this with our 2nd grader this year.
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Old 07-01-2009, 02:38 AM   #2
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Do either of the parents have their teaching credentials? If not I would be against it.
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Old 07-01-2009, 02:47 AM   #3
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Anyone here home school or was home schooled growing up?

Thoughts, opinions, stories, advise...

We're going to explore this with our 2nd grader this year.
I was due to being in a military family... but it was off and on... 3 of my 4 HS years were at a Catholic HS (1 was home schooled)... about 4 of my elementary years were home schooled.

I'd have to say that what you put in is what you get out. If you pull it off well odds are you're going to have a kid who's beyond his/her counterpart at the same age.

There is ONE major issue with it... and it is a major issue.

Socialization.

I still regret missing out on making friends etc due to home schooling. Missing that year of High School ****ing sucked.

I've ended up good though. Ended up graduating from college Summa Cum Laude, and I've never once had a bump with the law.

If you do chose home schooling, I'd highly suggest getting your kid involved in a lot of extracurricular activities such as sports etc.

I'm aware of some home schooled people who have done stupid **** once they were released into "the wild" so to speak and it ****ed up their lives or at least made it much harder.

Sometimes people will do stupid stuff to make up for the socialization they missed out on... drugs, sex, partying over studying etc.

Anyway, every person is different and in my view it's completely on the parents as to how their child will end up.

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Old 07-01-2009, 06:26 AM   #4
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Eep.

Well, it can works, but as Uber says, you've got to socialize those kids. And that means more than just socializing them at church and that sort of thing.

When they leave the nest, they're going to have to know how to interact with people that are not the same, ideologically, as they are. Socializing them with other religions, races, people with diverse interests, is SO important, or they'll be lost when they head to college.
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Old 07-01-2009, 07:32 AM   #5
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I did it for 6 years with my daughter. Loved it...but there are some things that I think are essential to know and do if you choose to do this. The great thing about home schooling is that you teach the child and you don't move on until they understand the subject. You typically can school for 4 hours a day 4 days a week because you cut out all the crap that typical teachers have to deal with when they have 30 kids to deal with. Also, you can take the 'education' wherever you go. To the parks, into nature, heading out to the wildlife, museums, etc.

I homeschooled through the 6th grade and then she went to public middle school and high school. She made the transition just fine.

1. Research curriculums. Don't skimp on purchasing all of the curriculum material and prepare yourself ahead of time. Make sure you understand the curriculum before you begin to teach it. Know your limits and hire a tutor if you don't understand. When you purchase the curriculum, make sure you purchase the teacher books as well. Make lesson plans, etc.
2. Get plugged in with a home school group in your area. This does a couple of things. It gives you support in all of the challenges you will face and there are often times daily or every other day social activities for the children to participate in. This is key!
3. As they get older, still assign homework and teach them to be responsible. If there are consequences for not doing homework, follow through with that just as if they were in school.
4. Make it enjoyable and not a chore. Make the classroom outdoors one day. Take a field trip to the museum. Add on to the curriculum in as many different ways as you can.
5. I recommend getting them involved in one or two sports like little league, soccer, etc. This is important for building the 'team' mentality. They might miss out on some of this with being home schooled, so they can pick that up in extra sports. Also, as they get older, know what the laws state. Your child has the right to participate in middle and high school sports in your school district even if they don't go to that school. You can enroll them in the sports as long as you pay the typical fee that other students pay.

Hope this helps. Shoot me a message if you have any questions!
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Old 07-01-2009, 07:41 AM   #6
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Homeschooling is great. There has been a lot of progress made to help the parents out too. Especially on the socialization front. There are a lot of programs out there to get homeschooled kids involved in to interact with other kids. Where I live there are also parents that will pool their resources and help one another out. Our church runs a lot of these programs and gets parents together to help each other out.
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Old 07-01-2009, 07:45 AM   #7
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Socialization.
This.

OTOH I went to a private school for high school. An all male Military Academy and there are some issues with socialization, but I am generally better educated than most people. If you have the ability to home school your kids several days and week, but get them to some level of public place once a week that's a good balance. Bottom line your kids will most likely be better educated and get better boards and most likely get into better schools with less financial burden at the risk of not having a bunch of friends that will mostly likely not be in their lives later on anyway.

Education will open doors. Friends do to, but one can depend on their education more.

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Old 07-01-2009, 08:15 AM   #8
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Eep.

Well, it can works, but as Uber says, you've got to socialize those kids. And that means more than just socializing them at church and that sort of thing.

When they leave the nest, they're going to have to know how to interact with people that are not the same, ideologically, as they are. Socializing them with other religions, races, people with diverse interests, is SO important, or they'll be lost when they head to college.
QFT. The high school aged kids that I have come in contact with over the last 7-8 years are very introverted or just social retards. They have a hard time acclimating to the rest of their peers and, as a reault, get shunned or ignored. It's very sad to witness.

Like Uber & Moose said, a wide variety of social outlets is key to the development of their interpersonal skills. Good luck!
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Old 07-01-2009, 08:22 AM   #9
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Anyone here home school or was home schooled growing up?

Thoughts, opinions, stories, advise...

We're going to explore this with our 2nd grader this year.
We homeschool. It's great. One of the best decisions we ever made.

1. You get to spend so much more time with your kids;

2. They get a really good education;

3. It's a whole lot easier to do than you would think.

4. You will largely end up homeschooling your kids anyway, even if they go to public school. They come home with at least 1 and closer to 2 hours of homework a night in public school. The tear-inducing stinky stuff usually comes home for the parents to deal with and the teachers seem to keep the fun stuff. When you homeschool, you finish up in 3-4 hours a day and you get to do a lot of the fun stuff with your kid (by third or fourth grade, a lot of that time is self directed study, monitored by the parent).

5. Your kid has some time during the day to be a kid when school is over. By the time they finish homework, public school kids are almost ready for bed.

You'll hear a lot of people giving you blah blah about "socialization." Folks who talk about homeschool socialization really have no idea what they are talking about.

At least here in CO, homeschooling is so common, there are group museum-trips, nature-hikes, picnics, ski-trips, visits to recycling plants, swimming-trips, visits to police and fire stations, etc etc etc and much more scheduled for every day of the week all year round for homeschoolers. You could stuff the kids to the gills with high-quality social activities if you want to. It's up to you and your kids to take advantage of it. But the ability to hang with other kids in a variety of settings is not a problem for homeschoolers.

There are a few differences I have observed in social skills development as between homeschoolers and public schoolers.

* For one, homeschoolers are not as adept at pecking-order stuff in late grade school and middle school as public school kids. So their skin isn't as thick when it comes to peer group taunting as public school kids. That can be a little hard for them. Maybe a small advantage for public school, although you could argue that both ways.

* Another is, public school kids tend to associate very strongly with their exact age group. Homeschool kids tend to pick friends over a much wider range of age groups. My boy, for example, is 9. His best friends range from 7 to 12. That is pretty typical for the homeschoolers we know. Not sure whether this is better or worse. It just is. But it's a very distinct difference.

* Finally, the homeschoolers I observe have, on average, much better social skills in dealing with adults than do public schoolers. Advantage, homeschool.

So all in all, there are some minor advantages and disadvantages to each in terms of developing social skills. I suspect those will have evened themselves out for 98% of students by the time they are 21.

You might want to consider COVA, if you are a Colorado resident. It's an online charter school. They pay you $40 a month to attend per student. You have access to a certified teacher to get you through rough spots. They have a really rigorous curriculum. Just to give you an example, I have a fourth grader who can discuss the Reformation and the Renaissance and how humanism influenced art and philosophy. The only reason he learned it is the curriculum made it fun. Heck, I have learned a lot teaching it.
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Old 07-01-2009, 08:32 AM   #10
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I wouldnt do it

Iv heard of some kids learning some strange stuff while being homeschooled
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:14 AM   #11
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There is ONE major issue with it... and it is a major issue.

Socialization.
I agree 100%.

To me, the negative about home schooling is not the education, it is the lack of social skills and experiences.

I am sure it works for some. If I was raising kids in a really bad neighborhood or something like that, it would be an option.

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Old 07-01-2009, 09:18 AM   #12
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We send our son to private school, and haven't decided on what we'll do for our daughter yet. (3)

But, I will say, I'm visiting family in the midwest right now and just spent yesterday with my cousins kids (12/10) and was blown away at what great kids they were. They're both home schooled, which I always had some reservation about. But, they just seem like such bright, adjusted kids. Their parents are smart and extremely involved, so either way.. that helps, of course.

But, their level of maturity seemed better developed in some ways, but they were definitely still kids. They also got along with each other surprisingly well for kids who are together so much. They're highly active in their home school group, and we even ran into a couple of kids from their group while we were out.

I certainly understand the socialization concern, and share it, to a point. But, I really wonder if what you gain by having the kids in a school setting (particularly a public school) really offsets what you lose from a hands-on and educational standpoint.

I've been fairly murky on the issue in the past, but living in California where we have **** public schools and a cheap private school costs 25K a year... I'm not ruling it out for the first few years of our daughter's education.
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:44 AM   #13
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I would be careful of measuring success based on how well kids get along with adults or how book learned they are. The primary goal of our public education system has always been one of socialization. The actual knowledge that one needs to get into a good university is embarrassingly low, and even at middle of the road universities capable students find it easy to overcome bad education.

What kids can not overcome is inability to socialize with peers; it takes nuance to learn the nonverbal cues of your own generation and that's something parents just can't teach. The cruel realities that kids may face in public schools more closely mirror the cruel realities found in the real world then the ones parents could generate at home. It's a difficult process to learn how to make and keep friends, and it's a difficult process to learn how to deal with people who don't like you and who you don't like but whom you must still deal with. (I also don't think organized sports teaches socialization in the same way a public or even private school would).
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:48 AM   #14
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do not do it, your kids will be weird when they grow up. any benefit they get from additional learning is killed because they dont have any people skills. do you want weird kids?
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:48 AM   #15
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Well, unless you are pushing your kid to pursue a future in competitive spelling I would stick with the public school system.
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:53 AM   #16
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I wouldnt do it

Iv heard of some kids learning some strange stuff while being homeschooled
. Let me give you some public school examples of strange stuff.

1. I learned, when I was in public school, that "duck and cover" was the correct response to a nuclear attack on our city. We even practiced it.

2. In high school history, my foreign exchange student learned that "the Spanish American war is an example of American paranoia about communism." My host-son was dubious and asked me. I pointed out that the Spanish American war was in 1898 and there were NO communist countries in the world until 1917 and that the war had absolutely nothing to do with communism. He made the mistake of asking about the date discrepancy in class. The teacher yelled at him.

3. Did you know that in High School English in CO, triple run-on-sentences are regarded as good-quality writing?

I regard all three of those things as really strange stuff that I know has been taught in public school in CO.

So the real question is, if you homeschooled, would YOU teach YOUR kids "strange stuff?" There is no homeschool genie that reaches out and makes you teach strange stuff to your kids. Nor is there a magic public school genie that makes public school teachers avoid strange stuff.

When you choose public schools for your kids, you pick the public school version of "strange stuff" for them.
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:58 AM   #17
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I would be careful of measuring success based on how well kids get along with adults or how book learned they are. The primary goal of our public education system has always been one of socialization. The actual knowledge that one needs to get into a good university is embarrassingly low, and even at middle of the road universities capable students find it easy to overcome bad education.

What kids can not overcome is inability to socialize with peers; it takes nuance to learn the nonverbal cues of your own generation and that's something parents just can't teach. The cruel realities that kids may face in public schools more closely mirror the cruel realities found in the real world then the ones parents could generate at home. It's a difficult process to learn how to make and keep friends, and it's a difficult process to learn how to deal with people who don't like you and who you don't like but whom you must still deal with. (I also don't think organized sports teaches socialization in the same way a public or even private school would).


Yea, I'd agree with a lot of this in principle. I just think the trade-off might be worth it in some cases. I also believe that a fairly well adjusted kid is going to do fine in either setting.

Personally, after leaving high school... I never found college or the workplace to be much like it. High school was its own entity. I enjoyed my experience, but it was more the sports, activities and being a musician that I liked. Sitting in class didn't really teach me any social skills, personally.
I learned most of those by getting out on my own and socializing, most of which I did with people outside of my high school due to where I lived, music, etc.

I used to be 100% on-board with the notion that home-schooling would socially injure kids. But, after being around some... and hearing more and more stories, I'm no longer convinced that's the case.

There are probably equal trade-offs for both scenarios.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:04 AM   #18
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That said, if I WOULD consider home-schooling, it would likely be for the younger years, and then probably a private school for jr. high and high school.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:07 AM   #19
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Here is my version of home schooling....from something that happened last night:

So my 3 year old boy is watching Ice Age......sucking the middle and ring fingers in his left hand (does this when he gets tired) and playing with his balls with his right hand. Mrs. Bean says to me...."are you going to talk to him about that?" I turn to my boy and tell him, "son, if you're going to play with your balls, at least have the common decency to cover yourself with your blanket first." He proceeded to go up to his room and return to the living room with his blankie, cover himself and go about his business. Mission accomplished.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:11 AM   #20
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I used to be 100% on-board with the notion that home-schooling would socially injure kids. But, after being around some... and hearing more and more stories, I'm no longer convinced that's the case.
You're right, that of course they're going to be success cases here, and many kids who would benefit from it, or have a natural social aptitude that wouldn't be hurt by homeschooling. But again, where you see a well adjusted kid, his/her peers might see a total square that the kid won't be able to shake until adulthood. Then again, total squares might have a perfectly fulfilling adultlife.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:32 AM   #21
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Homeschooling sucks....dont do it. For me, I had a friend that had the choice of doing homeschool or public. He chose public and his sister decided to do homeschooling. You are keeping your kid from interacting with others and learning to deal with ups and downs of life. The real world is interacting with people, not keeping them behind closed doors
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:34 AM   #22
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do not do it, your kids will be weird when they grow up. any benefit they get from additional learning is killed because they dont have any people skills. do you want weird kids?
Such nonsense. If you lock your kid in a closet, of couse it messes them up. If you rarely let them play with other kids, it messes them up. But I know a ton of homeschoolers. The problem we all have is limiting the social schedule so it doesn't gobble up our whole life.

There are up to 3 million kids homeschooled in America and it's still growing very rapidly. There are a lot of us. It's a whole different world about which a lot of misinformation is circulated--I suspect by the folks who lose money each time a kid leaves the public school system (that's the way public school finance works almost everywhere). But it's emphatically not a world with limited social opportunities. In fact, we own an old Suburban so we can lug around 6 or 7 kids (many not ours).

I would wager that the percent of public school kids who drool socially is about the same or greater than the percent of home school kids. I went to public school and, frankly, I was and still am somewhat of a social dork. My youngest brother went to the same schools and was and always has been a cool guy, very adept. Public school was a minor contributing factor in both cases, imho. I'm just a dork and I'm pretty sure I was born a dork.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:41 AM   #23
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Does home schooling cause social retardation like watching Ghostbusters? If so I would say dont do it.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:45 AM   #24
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Yea, I'd agree with a lot of this in principle. I just think the trade-off might be worth it in some cases. I also believe that a fairly well adjusted kid is going to do fine in either setting. . .
By and large that's true. But what a lot of folks don't know is that homeschooling has a very high percentage of kids who, for one reason or another were having a really difficult time in public school--learning disabilities, disruptive behavior, etc.

As a result the kids were pulled out of public school and homeschooled, either because the parents were getting sick of being called into school to handle behavioral issues or because they saw their kids were falling way behind academically.

I know of several such instances here in Jeffco. They all went thru at least two different elementary schools before they homeschooled. In all of those cases, the kids are doing better both academically and socially (not always great, but a lot better--these kids have problems) in homeschooling.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:51 AM   #25
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. Let me give you some public school examples of strange stuff.

1. I learned, when I was in public school, that "duck and cover" was the correct response to a nuclear attack on our city. We even practiced it.

2. In high school history, my foreign exchange student learned that "the Spanish American war is an example of American paranoia about communism." My host-son was dubious and asked me. I pointed out that the Spanish American war was in 1898 and there were NO communist countries in the world until 1917 and that the war had absolutely nothing to do with communism. He made the mistake of asking about the date discrepancy in class. The teacher yelled at him.

3. Did you know that in High School English in CO, triple run-on-sentences are regarded as good-quality writing?

I regard all three of those things as really strange stuff that I know has been taught in public school in CO.

So the real question is, if you homeschooled, would YOU teach YOUR kids "strange stuff?" There is no homeschool genie that reaches out and makes you teach strange stuff to your kids. Nor is there a magic public school genie that makes public school teachers avoid strange stuff.

When you choose public schools for your kids, you pick the public school version of "strange stuff" for them.
I am not sure if parents can be the most objective in subjects they themselves may not be highly knowledgeable in.

I wouldnt trust a parent in some subjects that may be "controversial" to give a child the most objective information to come to their own realizations.
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