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Old 05-16-2009, 02:00 AM   #1
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Just finished watching up the series on my HD TV and was it ever awesome. I grew up in Colorado Springs and I hiked up to the top of Pikes Peak 5 times (without oxygen........lol) and I could not believe how tired your body feels hiking that last 2 hours or so. You get headaches, and it seems you need to rest every 10 steps or so. And that's to go 14K feet.

Now think about going twice as high, to 29K feet. OMG, I don't know how the people do it, and especially those ones who have done it both without oxygen and the few who have done it in the dead of winter.

Watching that show, seeing how those top sherpas, not only climb that mountain every year, but help get people up and down that could not do it on their own, amazes me. And it's not like they hike up and down. On this show, you saw them go up to the top and lay all the new line for the group, come back down, help everybody up, and help everybody down. They are amazing people.

Anyway, if you like mountains, I highly recommend you to watch this series. I think it was on Discovery.

Take a peek at this pic below. The top of Pikes Peak would not even be in this picture. It is still several thousands of feet below where the glacier run is, 3000 feet below base camp at Everest. Wow, that is insane.

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Old 05-16-2009, 01:21 PM   #2
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Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:26 PM   #3
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I love that show, has anyone seen "The man who skied everest"
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:33 PM   #4
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Nice, I'll check it out.
I read Into Thin Air every couple years and the scale of such an expedition amazes me. To think sherpas have been doing it without oxygen for generations is incredible.
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:41 PM   #5
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Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.
Climbing mountains is boring. Its much more fun to jump off of them

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Old 05-16-2009, 02:00 PM   #6
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I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.
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Old 05-16-2009, 02:05 PM   #7
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Nothing beats this guy: http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2...86-5942928_ITM
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Old 05-16-2009, 02:36 PM   #8
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I've hiked to the top of a peak in the Black Hills..but it was only a little over 5k feet lol. When i went out to visit a good friend end of June of last year in NE Nevada..we went up into a mountain range just outside the town he lives in called the Ruby Mountains and climbed up to a old glacier lake...it was pretty cool, have no idea how high we were..prolly around 10k feel..there was still a lot of snow on the ground up there. It was pretty bad ass and well worth it...if i needed water i just filled up with the water dripping off the rocks...some of the best water i've ever drank!!
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Old 05-16-2009, 02:36 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by ZONA View Post
I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.
I cannot imagine climbing or hiking past dead bodies that have been stranded up there for almost a 100 years now.

Did you see the couple Nova's on PBS about the group that got stuck in a storm and lost a bunch of climbers? Or the one where Hillary? and his sherpa were recently found coming down the summit?

They were great documentaries. I guess if people love doing it great but I won't be hiking to any poles or climbing any mountians over 10k.

Oh and I am a suburbanite from Chi-town. I try to go hiking in the fall when we are in town for games. It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not hike or ski! Maybe you have to be closer into the foothills? You see a lot of hikers and bikers and climbers though when you are up there.
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Old 05-16-2009, 02:54 PM   #10
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That whole series was just awesome, the things some of these guys do and risk is incredible. I have a very good friend who climbed Everest and still walks with a slight limp because of the exposure/frostbite to his feet. BTW my boss is climbing all the 14Kers in the Rocky's.
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Old 05-16-2009, 03:24 PM   #11
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That's the "easy" route. The Northern route from Tibet is even more difficult / deadly, largely because it is less steep and therefore the climbers spend more time in the Death Zone.
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Old 05-16-2009, 03:28 PM   #12
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And doesn't Everest get a little higher each year?
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Old 05-16-2009, 04:02 PM   #13
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I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top.
Capital
Crestone Peak
Crestone Needle
Humbolt
Harvard
Yale
Sneffles
Longs



PS Some might find this interesting: Ski the 14ers Project

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Old 05-16-2009, 04:12 PM   #14
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Capital
Crestone Peak
Crestone Needle
Humbolt
Harvard
Yale
Sneffles
Longs



PS Some might find this interesting: Ski the 14ers Project
I've done longs to the top, went backside past the keyhole and the one grave on the mountain during a winter climb.
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Old 05-16-2009, 04:27 PM   #15
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I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.

The man left to die on the main trail was David Sharp, and they passed him by on the ascent and descent.


Quote:
Sir Edmund Hillary was highly critical of the decision not to try to rescue Sharp, saying that leaving other climbers to die is unacceptable, and the desire to get to the summit has become all-important. He also said, "I think the whole attitude towards climbing Mount Everest has become rather horrifying. The people just want to get to the top. It was wrong if there was a man suffering altitude problems and was huddled under a rock, just to lift your hat, say good morning and pass on by". He also told the New Zealand Herald that he was horrified by the callous attitude of today’s climbers. "They don’t give a damn for anybody else who may be in distress and it doesn’t impress me at all that they leave someone lying under a rock to die" and that, "I think that their priority was to get to the top and the welfare of one of the... of a member of an expedition was very secondary." [3] Hillary also called Mark Inglis "crazy" [5].

In the documentary "Dying For Everest" (broadcast on SKY 20.04.09), Mark Inglis now states: "From my memory, I used the radio. I got a reply to move on and there is nothing that I can do to help. Now I'm not sure whether it was from Russell or from someone else, or whether you know..it's just Hypoxia and it's... it's in your mind." Russell received many radio messages (many of which were heard by others) that night and a full log was kept. There is no record of any call from Mark Inglis. The group continued to the summit, passing David Sharp, without offering any assistance. David was in a grave condition. On their decent, passing back through the cave several hours later, the group found David near death. Sir Edmund Hillary described Mark Inglis attitude as "pathetic".
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:00 PM   #16
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I also grew up in the springs and climbed Pikes Peak when I was younger. When we got to the top I ran around all excited...................and then I passed out. You have to take it easy at altitude.
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:08 PM   #17
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Climbing mountains is stupid ... The loss of life and in some places the money spent trying to save these fools ...

Seen stories of them having to rescue the same people over and over on the tax payers dollar ... I say if you are stupid enough to go someplace that requires a rescue you either pay back the money it cost or we need to start leaving these idiots ...


Cool tv show tho ... I root for the mountain to win ...
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:20 PM   #18
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Hey AZ...is it available to buy on DVD or BR yet??
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Old 05-16-2009, 07:02 PM   #19
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I used to hike regulalrly when I lived in colorado - I hiked about 20 of the 14ers and my room-mate climbed all 54. Unfortuantely, I don't hike much these days though.

I have not seen this documentary - Is this same as the one that covered the Jon Krauker's 'Into Thin Air'?

btw, If you like climbing you must read 'Touching the Void' book, The film was good but the book was really incredible.
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Old 05-16-2009, 07:14 PM   #20
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Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.
Wow, condescending much? Besides, WTF do you care? I head to the hills to get away from people. The fewer people, the better.
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:10 PM   #21
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I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top.
My List (more or less in order of doing them):
Grays
Torreys
Quandry (now 3x)
Elbert
Longs
Sherman
Democrat (2x)
Lincoln (2x)
Bross (2x)
Oxford
Belford
Huron
Redcloud
Sunshine
Handies
San Luis
Bierstdat
Evans
Massive (on the 3rd try)
La Plata
Yale
Harvard
Antero

Started but turned back on:
Missouri
Uncompaghre



That makes 5 of us so far. Any more?
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:23 PM   #22
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Took this today. Great thread btw....

I even got out of the car to hike it once.


Last edited by Meck77; 05-16-2009 at 09:29 PM..
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:28 PM   #23
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I cannot imagine climbing or hiking past dead bodies that have been stranded up there for almost a 100 years now.

Did you see the couple Nova's on PBS about the group that got stuck in a storm and lost a bunch of climbers? Or the one where Hillary? and his sherpa were recently found coming down the summit?

They were great documentaries. I guess if people love doing it great but I won't be hiking to any poles or climbing any mountians over 10k.

Oh and I am a suburbanite from Chi-town. I try to go hiking in the fall when we are in town for games. It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not hike or ski! Maybe you have to be closer into the foothills? You see a lot of hikers and bikers and climbers though when you are up there.
The Nova one was very intense. Very intense drama in a documentary format. The one where they stumbled on SIr Edmund Hillary's remains was a good one. Dude climbed Everest in 1921 I believe with pretty primitive equipment. The phrase 'only mad dogs and Englishmen' certainly applies there.

Myself, I've never done a 14'r. I always stop at the highest lake to fish. Once or twice a year I'll take a break from fishing and go a little higher to the Divide, but that doesn't mean a 14'r.

It's getting to be about that time to get up into the high country. And don't talk to me about It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not [go into the high country]. Dude, there's so many gotdang people up there nowadays the high country has lost a lot of its luster.

Where 20 years ago there was 5 people and two vehicles, there's now 100 people and 40 vehicles.

Ah, I long for the good old days. Prosperity and progress is a two-edged sword.
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:38 PM   #24
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Worked for MountainSmith, The Boulder Mountaineer, and had my guiding cert back in the early to mid Eighties. Bagged 35 of the 14ers. Also had a chance to do Denali. The whole scene surrounding Everest sickens me. Give me K2 any day of the week for technical difficulty and mountaineering accomplishment. I'll have to check out the series, heard it was great. "Void " is a great read. For a very different Himalaya experience try "One Cup of Tea". In 1993, mountain-climber Greg Mortenson nearly lost his life trying to climb one of the world’s highest mountains, K2 in northern Pakistan. Reeling from his failed attempt, Mortenson stumbled into the village of Korphe in Pakistan’s Karakoram Himalaya region. There he saw children huddled in the cold wind, scratching out lessons with sticks in the hard ground. He was inspired and impetuously made a promise to the village’s leader, Haji Ali: I will build you a school. That promise took him to rock bottom and back again as he despaired while living in his car to save money for the school until a generous benefactor set him on his way. His remarkable odyssesy reflects the astounding humanitarian reach that one person can generate. By building schools for poor Pakistani and Afghan Muslim youth, Greg Mortenson promotes peace by fighting illiteracy. As a former Mountaineer and Combat Vet Marine, I am humbled by what this guy has done.
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:51 PM   #25
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Az...youre soooo likeable...
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