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Old 04-07-2009, 09:29 PM   #1
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Fascinating statistical comparison of 08 Broncos and 07 Patriots. Plummer haters and Cutler apologists will find much to gripe with, but an interesting breakdown worth discussing.

http://coldhardfootballfacts.com/Art...ulus_plan.html

A team in need of a statistical stimulus plan

Denver has been one of the league’s marquee franchises since the arrival of John Elway more than quarter century ago.

But the Broncos sit here in the 2009 off-season surrounded by so much chaos that we swear we saw their fans smashing windows yesterday outside the G-20 summit in London.

Mike Shanahan was dumped as head coach at the end of last year’s disappointing 8-8 campaign, following 14 successful seasons during which he guided the organization to its only two Super Bowl titles.

Quarterback Jay Cutler, meanwhile, the face of the franchise and the team’s No. 1 pick in the 2006 draft, was shipped to Chicago yesterday after a highly publicized pissing match with Shanahan’s replacement, former Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels – the baby-faced 32-year-old head coach (33 on April 22) charged with rebuilding the Broncos brand. Denver landed Bears signal-caller Kyle Orton and a stunning two first-round draft picks.

The Broncos who run onto the field in September will look and feel a whole lot different than the Broncos who sheepishly walked off the field back in December.

And that’s a very good thing for the Denver faithful as they look toward their own New World Order.

In fact, the 2008 Broncos were in desperate need of an auto-industry-style makeover and were an organization scarred by acts of statistical dysfunction so profound that only the Cold, Hard Football Facts have the insight you need to put it all into perspective.

Denver’s Shocking Statistical Soulmate
To comprehend the chaos in Denver here in the 2009 off-season, you need to wrap your fragile little mind around two sets of data about two very different teams.

Don’t worry, this will be fun … and incredibly enlightening.

Consider Team A. It averaged:

* 411.2 yards per game
* 295.7 passing yards per game
* 115.6 rushing yards per game
* An inspiring 6.22 yards per offensive play over the course of an entire season.

Now Consider Team B. It averaged:

* 395.8 yards per game
* 279.4 passing yards per game
* 116.4 rushing yards per game
* An inspiring 6.21 yards per offensive play over the course of an entire season.

Given the highly comparable offensive numbers – a slight but hardly significant edge to Team A in most categories – you’d assume that Team A was slightly more productive on offense than Team B, but not by much. After all, each snap by each team yielded nearly the same exact gain of 6.2 yards.

We’d make that same assumption, too.

But both of us would be wrong.

Team A is the 16-0 Patriots of 2007 – who scored an NFL-record 589 points (36.8 PPG), the second-highest per-game average in the entire history of the league (1950 Rams, 38.8 PPG).

Team B is the 8-8 Broncos of 2008 – who scored a paltry 370 points (23.1), barely ranking in the top half of the league last year (16th).

That’s right: the 2008 Broncos moved the ball up and down the field nearly as well as the offense many consider the greatest in the history of the game. On a per-play basis, the 2007 Patriots and 2008 Broncos were statistical equals.

But when it came to the two results that actually mattered – turning those yards into points and victories – the two teams could not have been more different. The 2007 Patriots boasted twice as many victories and outscored the 2008 Broncos by better than two touchdowns per game.

The 2008 Broncos, in other words, were an extraordinarily inefficient offense.

Right or wrong, quarterbacks always shoulder an undue amount of praise and blame for their team’s fortunes. So, naturally, the blame for Denver’s dysfunction fell on the shoulders of the quarterback – or at least it did in the eyes of the only person that matters: new head coach Josh McDaniels, a guy who had a front-row seat to New England's version of 6.2 yards per play as the team’s offensive coordinator.

A Very Bad Trend
Cutler was seen by most pigskin “pundits” as one of the bright young stars of the NFL – a player who seemed to prove his place in the NFL when he passed for a tremendous 4,526 yards last year.

It was easily the most prolific passing season in franchise history. Consider that John Elway himself surpassed the 4,000-yard mark just once – and just barely – with 4,030 yards in 1993.

So many observers were confused when McDaniels walked in and immediately made noise about acquiring another quarterback, touching off the flame war that ended in Cutler’s trade to Chicago on Thursday.

But McDaniels apparently knew what the Cold, Hard Football Facts have long told you: yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

Let us say that again to be very clear: Yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

And few teams in history epitomized the vast emptiness of yards as an indicator of success better than the Broncos under Cutler.

In fact, his ascent to the role of starting QB was marked by rapid descent in Denver’s offensive efficiency and, therefore, in Denver’s success as a team.

* The 2008 Broncos needed to produce a daunting 17.12 yards of offense for every point it scored in 2008 – 28th in the NFL as measured by the Cold, Hard Football Facts Scoreability Index, our measure of offensive efficiency. They went 8-8.
* The 2007 Broncos were even worse: they needed to produce 17.32 yards of offense for every point it scored – 25th in the NFL as measured by our Scoreability Index. They went 7-9.

To find the last time that Broncos boasted an efficient offense – an offense that effectively squeezed points out of its yards – you have to go back to the 2005 Broncos under Jake Plummer.

The 2005 Broncos ranked 9th on our Scoreability Index, scoring a point for every 14.6 yards of offense. Not so coincidentally, the 2005 Broncos went 13-3 and were one game away from reaching the Super Bowl.

But for some reason that seems inexplicable in retrospect, the offensive efficiency and the 13-3 season weren't good enough for Denver fans or for the organization. In fact, Plummer, the quarterback behind that fairly efficient 2005 Broncos offense, was pigskin persona-non-grata in Denver. From fans to management, it seems nobody liked Plummer.

So, in the wake of their 13-3 season, the Broncos devoted their top pick in the 2006 draft to Jay Cutler, the proverbial quarterback of the future.

He threw pretty passes and put up big individual numbers. His 87.1 career passer rating, for example, easily exceed's Elway's 79.9 career passer rating.

But the Broncos under Cutler could not put the ball in the end zone. Denver clearly had serious defensive issues that made it harder for the offense to score points (last year's Broncos ranked 30th, surrendering 28.0 PPG). But it doesn't change the fact that, in two seasons with Cutler the clear-cut No. 1 quarterback, Denver's offensive efficiency crashed faster and more sharply than the Icelandic stock market.

The Cold, Hard Football Facts saw the problems with Denver through our Scoreability Index, even as most of the pigskin “pundits” gawked at Cutler's gaudy yardage total.

McDaniels apparently saw the same problems we did, too. After all, he learned what 6.2 yards per play looked like when he guided the Patriots to a record 589 points in 2007. And he must have been shocked when he watched film of Cutler and the Denver offense and its version of 6.2 yards per play last season.

He apparently knew big changes were in order. Cutler took the bait, making it clear he was not happy in Denver.

So McDaniels and the Broncos flipped an pouting, inefficient quarterback for Kyle Orton, who’s won 21 of his 32 NFL starts with the Bears, and a stunning two first-round draft picks.

It's a great deal for a team that desperately needed a statistical stimulus plan.
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Old 04-07-2009, 09:41 PM   #2
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Interesting how field position and shlttiness of kicker is not added into the magic equation.
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Old 04-07-2009, 09:47 PM   #3
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That's why I don't think it is unreasonable to ponder if Orton can be a better player than Jay in McDs system, everything considered.
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Old 04-07-2009, 09:47 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Kid A View Post
Fascinating statistical comparison of 08 Broncos and 07 Patriots. Plummer haters and Cutler apologists will find much to gripe with, but an interesting breakdown worth discussing.

http://coldhardfootballfacts.com/Art...ulus_plan.html

A team in need of a statistical stimulus plan

Denver has been one of the league’s marquee franchises since the arrival of John Elway more than quarter century ago.

But the Broncos sit here in the 2009 off-season surrounded by so much chaos that we swear we saw their fans smashing windows yesterday outside the G-20 summit in London.

Mike Shanahan was dumped as head coach at the end of last year’s disappointing 8-8 campaign, following 14 successful seasons during which he guided the organization to its only two Super Bowl titles.

Quarterback Jay Cutler, meanwhile, the face of the franchise and the team’s No. 1 pick in the 2006 draft, was shipped to Chicago yesterday after a highly publicized pissing match with Shanahan’s replacement, former Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels – the baby-faced 32-year-old head coach (33 on April 22) charged with rebuilding the Broncos brand. Denver landed Bears signal-caller Kyle Orton and a stunning two first-round draft picks.

The Broncos who run onto the field in September will look and feel a whole lot different than the Broncos who sheepishly walked off the field back in December.

And that’s a very good thing for the Denver faithful as they look toward their own New World Order.

In fact, the 2008 Broncos were in desperate need of an auto-industry-style makeover and were an organization scarred by acts of statistical dysfunction so profound that only the Cold, Hard Football Facts have the insight you need to put it all into perspective.

Denver’s Shocking Statistical Soulmate
To comprehend the chaos in Denver here in the 2009 off-season, you need to wrap your fragile little mind around two sets of data about two very different teams.

Don’t worry, this will be fun … and incredibly enlightening.

Consider Team A. It averaged:

* 411.2 yards per game
* 295.7 passing yards per game
* 115.6 rushing yards per game
* An inspiring 6.22 yards per offensive play over the course of an entire season.

Now Consider Team B. It averaged:

* 395.8 yards per game
* 279.4 passing yards per game
* 116.4 rushing yards per game
* An inspiring 6.21 yards per offensive play over the course of an entire season.

Given the highly comparable offensive numbers – a slight but hardly significant edge to Team A in most categories – you’d assume that Team A was slightly more productive on offense than Team B, but not by much. After all, each snap by each team yielded nearly the same exact gain of 6.2 yards.

We’d make that same assumption, too.

But both of us would be wrong.

Team A is the 16-0 Patriots of 2007 – who scored an NFL-record 589 points (36.8 PPG), the second-highest per-game average in the entire history of the league (1950 Rams, 38.8 PPG).

Team B is the 8-8 Broncos of 2008 – who scored a paltry 370 points (23.1), barely ranking in the top half of the league last year (16th).

That’s right: the 2008 Broncos moved the ball up and down the field nearly as well as the offense many consider the greatest in the history of the game. On a per-play basis, the 2007 Patriots and 2008 Broncos were statistical equals.

But when it came to the two results that actually mattered – turning those yards into points and victories – the two teams could not have been more different. The 2007 Patriots boasted twice as many victories and outscored the 2008 Broncos by better than two touchdowns per game.

The 2008 Broncos, in other words, were an extraordinarily inefficient offense.

Right or wrong, quarterbacks always shoulder an undue amount of praise and blame for their team’s fortunes. So, naturally, the blame for Denver’s dysfunction fell on the shoulders of the quarterback – or at least it did in the eyes of the only person that matters: new head coach Josh McDaniels, a guy who had a front-row seat to New England's version of 6.2 yards per play as the team’s offensive coordinator.

A Very Bad Trend
Cutler was seen by most pigskin “pundits” as one of the bright young stars of the NFL – a player who seemed to prove his place in the NFL when he passed for a tremendous 4,526 yards last year.

It was easily the most prolific passing season in franchise history. Consider that John Elway himself surpassed the 4,000-yard mark just once – and just barely – with 4,030 yards in 1993.

So many observers were confused when McDaniels walked in and immediately made noise about acquiring another quarterback, touching off the flame war that ended in Cutler’s trade to Chicago on Thursday.

But McDaniels apparently knew what the Cold, Hard Football Facts have long told you: yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

Let us say that again to be very clear: Yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

And few teams in history epitomized the vast emptiness of yards as an indicator of success better than the Broncos under Cutler.

In fact, his ascent to the role of starting QB was marked by rapid descent in Denver’s offensive efficiency and, therefore, in Denver’s success as a team.

* The 2008 Broncos needed to produce a daunting 17.12 yards of offense for every point it scored in 2008 – 28th in the NFL as measured by the Cold, Hard Football Facts Scoreability Index, our measure of offensive efficiency. They went 8-8.
* The 2007 Broncos were even worse: they needed to produce 17.32 yards of offense for every point it scored – 25th in the NFL as measured by our Scoreability Index. They went 7-9.

To find the last time that Broncos boasted an efficient offense – an offense that effectively squeezed points out of its yards – you have to go back to the 2005 Broncos under Jake Plummer.

The 2005 Broncos ranked 9th on our Scoreability Index, scoring a point for every 14.6 yards of offense. Not so coincidentally, the 2005 Broncos went 13-3 and were one game away from reaching the Super Bowl.

But for some reason that seems inexplicable in retrospect, the offensive efficiency and the 13-3 season weren't good enough for Denver fans or for the organization. In fact, Plummer, the quarterback behind that fairly efficient 2005 Broncos offense, was pigskin persona-non-grata in Denver. From fans to management, it seems nobody liked Plummer.

So, in the wake of their 13-3 season, the Broncos devoted their top pick in the 2006 draft to Jay Cutler, the proverbial quarterback of the future.

He threw pretty passes and put up big individual numbers. His 87.1 career passer rating, for example, easily exceed's Elway's 79.9 career passer rating.

But the Broncos under Cutler could not put the ball in the end zone. Denver clearly had serious defensive issues that made it harder for the offense to score points (last year's Broncos ranked 30th, surrendering 28.0 PPG). But it doesn't change the fact that, in two seasons with Cutler the clear-cut No. 1 quarterback, Denver's offensive efficiency crashed faster and more sharply than the Icelandic stock market.

The Cold, Hard Football Facts saw the problems with Denver through our Scoreability Index, even as most of the pigskin “pundits” gawked at Cutler's gaudy yardage total.

McDaniels apparently saw the same problems we did, too. After all, he learned what 6.2 yards per play looked like when he guided the Patriots to a record 589 points in 2007. And he must have been shocked when he watched film of Cutler and the Denver offense and its version of 6.2 yards per play last season.

He apparently knew big changes were in order. Cutler took the bait, making it clear he was not happy in Denver.

So McDaniels and the Broncos flipped an pouting, inefficient quarterback for Kyle Orton, who’s won 21 of his 32 NFL starts with the Bears, and a stunning two first-round draft picks.

It's a great deal for a team that desperately needed a statistical stimulus plan.

Very interesting tho.
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:20 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by spdirty View Post
Interesting how field position and shlttiness of kicker is not added into the magic equation.
Very good point, especially on the field position. I would bet the Pats had significantly better starting position. I think whenever you try to come to a conclusion based on a certain set of stats there is usually another another group that could be brought into the discussion.

That said, I think the there is a very valid point to be made that impressive yardage does not a great offense make. And I think the article touches on some of the mentality that may have made Cutler expendable in McDaniels' mind.
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:27 PM   #6
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Very good point, especially on the field position. I would bet the Pats had significantly better starting position. I think whenever you try to come to a conclusion based on a certain set of stats there is usually another another group that could be brought into the discussion.

That said, I think the there is a very valid point to be made that impressive yardage does not a great offense make. And I think the article touches on some of the mentality that may have made Cutler expendable in McDaniels' mind.
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:27 PM   #7
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But McDaniels apparently knew what the Cold, Hard Football Facts have long told you: yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

Let us say that again to be very clear: Yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

And few teams in history epitomized the vast emptiness of yards as an indicator of success better than the Broncos under Cutler.


Been saying this for years.

People around this forum are absolutely infatuated with passing yardage numbers, despite its insignificance. Once again this year, the winning QB in the playoffs averaged something like 230 yards passing, 2 TDs and 1 INT a game.

Playoff games are won on the ground, and on defense. The passing game has to be efficient, and potent when it needs to be, but rarely are SB teams built around big passing yards. Yes, there are exceptions... obviously.

Passing is fun to watch. I love it. I grew up watching Elway put up 300 yard games every weekend. But, more important is an efficient QB who can make tough throws, move the chains, etc. (You know, the boring stuff.)

Elway just happened to be talented enough to put up big numbers, but smart enough to fit into a refined system, as well. He's few and far between.
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:30 PM   #8
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Very good point, especially on the field position. I would bet the Pats had significantly better starting position. I think whenever you try to come to a conclusion based on a certain set of stats there is usually another another group that could be brought into the discussion.

That said, I think the there is a very valid point to be made that impressive yardage does not a great offense make. And I think the article touches on some of the mentality that may have made Cutler expendable in McDaniels' mind.
Another thing, the defense last year had 13 turnovers. The NFL record for fewest turnovers forced in a 16 game season is 12. Which means the offense got the ball back by punt of kickoff so damn much it was unbelievable...and with our shltty special teams and Shannys unwillingness to use Royal in the return department most of the season had to play another real effect into that yards per point ratio.


Just the fact that this team was able to go 8-8 last year is pretty unbelievable, and a testament to the offense that Shanahan built. But, its OK...much much easier to blame the pro bowl QB I guess.


Anyway, I expect the offense to be much better next year in points scored. No excuses.

Last edited by spdirty; 04-07-2009 at 10:33 PM..
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:36 PM   #9
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But McDaniels apparently knew what the Cold, Hard Football Facts have long told you: yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

Let us say that again to be very clear: Yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

And few teams in history epitomized the vast emptiness of yards as an indicator of success better than the Broncos under Cutler.


Been saying this for years.

People around this forum are absolutely infatuated with passing yardage numbers, despite its insignificance. Once again this year, the winning QB in the playoffs averaged something like 230 yards passing, 2 TDs and 1 INT a game.

Playoff games are won on the ground, and on defense. The passing game has to be efficient, and potent when it needs to be, but rarely are SB teams built around big passing yards. Yes, there are exceptions... obviously.

Passing is fun to watch. I love it. I grew up watching Elway put up 300 yard games every weekend. But, more important is an efficient QB who can make tough throws, move the chains, etc. (You know, the boring stuff.)

Elway just happened to be talented enough to put up big numbers, but smart enough to fit into a refined system, as well. He's few and far between.
Well lets just hope the wunderkid realizes that talent that is Peyton hillis and rides that bull at least 20X a game.

Last edited by spdirty; 04-07-2009 at 10:40 PM..
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:42 PM   #10
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Very interesting tho.
Why do you have to quote a huge artical, to only then put a smiley face after it? Do you think we wouldn't know to which subject you were refering?
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:45 PM   #11
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Very interesting article.

The things that make you go....hmmmm.
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Old 04-07-2009, 10:57 PM   #12
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Why do you have to quote a huge artical, to only then put a smiley face after it? Do you think we wouldn't know to which subject you were refering?
There was an error that I bolded, I shoulda just clipped a little bit. Mah bad!
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:40 AM   #13
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That's why I don't think it is unreasonable to ponder if Orton can be a better player than Jay in McDs system, everything considered.
Its unreasonable to ponder it because it wasn't thought of before Orton became a Bronco.
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:48 AM   #14
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Its unreasonable to ponder it because it wasn't thought of before Orton became a Bronco.
Yet, here I am pondering away.
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:55 AM   #15
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Yet, here I am pondering away.
here you are NOW pondering away. I bet Pats fans where pondering what it would have been like to have Brady leading the team last year and not Cassel.
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:54 AM   #16
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you know what. i really don't care anymore. i was on Jay's side through the entire situation. but he is gone, and right now, i don't give a **** who is handling the snaps as long as we can put the ball in the damn end zone.

those stats were sickening, that we could move the ball as well as the best offense in NFL history yet were more than 200 points scored behind them.


i know field position, defense, turnovers, all play a bigger role in points scored than the majority of these articles mention, but it is still sickening to think of how good this offense could have been last season had it been consistant
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Old 04-08-2009, 02:23 AM   #17
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We also had cooked crack thinking he was starting...not playing...starting...for the Broncos at one point this past year.

This offense clearly had issues...along with everything else. That was in spite of Jay and not due to him. To claim otherwise is beyond ridiculous.

Now, claiming that Denver should never have drafted Jay to begin with....well that is a different debate that is at least viable.
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Old 04-08-2009, 03:56 AM   #18
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Why is this surprising? The lack of scoring is the result of ineffective run game not Cutler. In the red zone passing become extremely hard due to the limited space. That is why folks have been saying that offense need an effective runner to take the next step. Unless one the backs step up, it doesn't matter who the QB is. But go ahead and blame Cutler.
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:55 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Popps View Post
Passing is fun to watch. I love it. I grew up watching Elway put up 300 yard games every weekend. But, more important is an efficient QB who can make tough throws, move the chains, etc. (You know, the boring stuff.)

Elway just happened to be talented enough to put up big numbers, but smart enough to fit into a refined system, as well. He's few and far between.
ever try watching cfl games ?

500 yard games happen all the time, heck weve even had a couple 600 yard passing games
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Old 04-08-2009, 05:37 AM   #20
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But McDaniels apparently knew what the Cold, Hard Football Facts have long told you: yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

Let us say that again to be very clear: Yards, and passing yards in particular, have virtually no correlation to success in the NFL.

And few teams in history epitomized the vast emptiness of yards as an indicator of success better than the Broncos under Cutler.


Been saying this for years.

People around this forum are absolutely infatuated with passing yardage numbers, despite its insignificance. Once again this year, the winning QB in the playoffs averaged something like 230 yards passing, 2 TDs and 1 INT a game.

Playoff games are won on the ground, and on defense. The passing game has to be efficient, and potent when it needs to be, but rarely are SB teams built around big passing yards. Yes, there are exceptions... obviously.

Passing is fun to watch. I love it. I grew up watching Elway put up 300 yard games every weekend. But, more important is an efficient QB who can make tough throws, move the chains, etc. (You know, the boring stuff.)

Elway just happened to be talented enough to put up big numbers, but smart enough to fit into a refined system, as well. He's few and far between.
Ya, no doubt. When I think of monster passing yards, the first thing I think of Dan Marino - the ringless Dan Marino. I think of those AFC teams that lost a gazillion SBs in a row, cuz while they could pass like mad they couldnt play 'D' and they couldnt grind it out on the ground. I think of how many times a team passes for over 300 yds and loses compared to how many times a team can rush for 125-150 yds and lose a game. Its not unheard of to throw for over 400 and lose. It is unheard of to run for 200 and lose.

Here is another fact they missed from their comparision between the 07 Pats and 08 Broncos.

Brady 50 TDs, 8 INTs
Cutler 25 TDs, 18 INTs

In total, Denver gave up the ball 37 times - New England gave it 12 times...
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:02 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by loborugger View Post
Ya, no doubt. When I think of monster passing yards, the first thing I think of Dan Marino - the ringless Dan Marino. I think of those AFC teams that lost a gazillion SBs in a row, cuz while they could pass like mad they couldnt play 'D' and they couldnt grind it out on the ground. I think of how many times a team passes for over 300 yds and loses compared to how many times a team can rush for 125-150 yds and lose a game. Its not unheard of to throw for over 400 and lose. It is unheard of to run for 200 and lose.

Here is another fact they missed from their comparision between the 07 Pats and 08 Broncos.

Brady 50 TDs, 8 INTs
Cutler 25 TDs, 18 INTs

In total, Denver gave up the ball 37 times - New England gave it 12 times...
And... Even the great Peyton Manning needed a solid run game to win his SB ring. Hopefully, McD brings some magic back to our run game.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:08 AM   #22
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I would really like to see a similar write-up of the Orton-led Bears offense.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:31 AM   #23
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The Broncos were never winning anything with Cutler until the ground game got settled and more importantly, the defense could actually make some stops, which was not happening for awhile now.

And stops need to also be ones where they are 3 plays and punt.

When the Bronco defense the last few years was able to stop a team from scoring, they usually allowed the offense to move the ball to at least midfield before punting, which of course, most punters will either pin you inside your own 20 or at best, you're staring at the 20.

So again, the Bronco offense was usually losing the field position battle and if going up against a good defense, just how many 80+ yard scoring drives do you expect to get in a game? Without the help of a long pass, long run, or penalty, you won't get many.

This was a problem even when Plummer as the QB. The Broncos rarely and I mean RARELY, started a drive even past their own 35 yard line.

It's difficult to be consistently good when you consistently lose the battle of field position every game.

What the Broncos need is a defense that will not only limit scoring drives obviously, but also make teams punt after just 3 plays or at least not punting to the short field and the Broncos start in bad field position all the time.

Of course creating turnovers, something the defense has not done in awhile either, might help the offense start in better field position too.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:31 AM   #24
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Damn...

With that many turnovers The only reason we got as many yards as we did is that our defense sucked so bad we'd get the ball right back after a quick TD.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:34 AM   #25
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A significant point that is conveniently left out; Denver never won the field position game during Cutler's tenure. NEVER. No matter what Denver did on offense the defense rarely went 3 and out. There have been more Bigfoot sightings during Cutler's tenure than Bronco D stands or 3 and outs. So, Denver, at best, had a long field but usually were fielding a kickoff (with shoddy results) after a field goal or TD which put Cutler's offense without a running game with a 75 yard field and the pressure to just keep up in terms of scoring. If they managed to crack a lead they always had to press for more because Denver's D continually buckles like cheap lawn furniture. All the pressure to win games, the expectation to win games, fell on Cutler and the offense and without a consistant running game that's asking a lot and Cutler's arm kept this club competitive when it shouldn't have been. So hate on the kid all you want but McKid blew a golden opportunity to work with a rare talent.
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