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Old 02-25-2011, 02:12 PM   #2251
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Classroom Supermen: A Global Vision for the Future of Education



Dominic Basulto on February 25, 2011, 12:56 PM
Avenues

If you had a chance to create the perfect K-12 educational institution from scratch - and if money was no object - how would you do it? You'd probably start by hand-selecting some of the smartest and most talented educators in the world to develop the vision for the school. Then, you'd ask them to implement a radically new global curriculum that ensures that graduates would become leaders on the future world stage. To make this a reality, you'd make sure that the student body had ready access to the finest educational, artistic and athletic resources in the world. For good measure, you'd bring in a world-class architectural firm to design a stunning building and situate the educational institution in the center of one of the most vibrant cities in the world.

That's the vision for Avenues: The World School, a unique for-profit educational institution opening its doors in New York City's High Line district in 2012. The final goal - brought to you by former Yale President Benno Schmidt and educational pioneer Christopher Whittle (founder of Edison Schools) is to create a truly global educational institution with twenty satellite campuses all over the world - in places like India, China, Brazil, Russia and Europe. By the time that they graduate, students will be fluent in Spanish and Mandarin, at home in any international environment, and confident contributors in the arts (thanks to partnerships with NYC art galleries in Chelsea). To make that vision a reality, Whittle and Schmidt have assembled a top-tier leadership team that includes former heads at some of the nation's elite private schools - Hotchkiss, Exeter and Dalton.
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Old 02-25-2011, 07:14 PM   #2252
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I don't want a nation of thinkers, I want a nation of workers.

John Rockefeller
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Old 02-28-2011, 06:40 AM   #2253
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...ef=online-news

Bitter tastes make you more judgemental

DON'T drink and judge - bitter tastes alter your moral compass, making you more judgemental.

So say Kendall Eskine at the City University of New York and colleagues, who asked 57 volunteers to rate how morally questionable a set of scenarios were on a scale of 1 to 100. These included a man eating his already-dead dog, and second cousins engaging in consensual sex. The participants also indicated their political orientation.

Before and halfway through the exercise, participants were given a bitter drink, a sweet juice or water.

Those who drank bitter drinks were much harsher in their judgements than those who drank water, giving scenarios a score that was on average 27 per cent higher. Intriguingly, politically conservative individuals were more strongly affected by bitter tastes than liberals (Psychological Science, DOI: 10.1177/0956797611398497).

Although the mechanisms linking taste and behaviour are not yet clear, the authors ask whether jurors should avoid bitter tastes and whether food preferences play a role in shaping political ideals.
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Old 02-28-2011, 06:41 AM   #2254
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http://designyoutrust.com/2011/02/26...n+You+Trust%29

Eat Healthier With The Wheel of Nutrition

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Old 02-28-2011, 07:10 AM   #2255
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http://www.kurzweilai.net/quantum-an...o-memory-cells

‘Quantum antennas’ enable exchange of quantum information between two memory cells

An Austrian research group led by physicist Rainer Blatt suggests a fundamentally novel architecture for quantum computation. They have experimentally demonstrated quantum antennas, which enable the exchange of quantum information between two separate memory cells located on a computer chip. This offers new opportunities to build practical quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the scientific journal Nature.

Six years ago scientists at the University of Innsbruck realized the first quantum byte — a quantum computer with eight entangled quantum particles; a record that still stands. “Nevertheless, to make practical use of a quantum computer that performs calculations, we need a lot more quantum bits,” says Prof. Rainer Blatt, who, with his research team at the Institute for Experimental Physics, created the first quantum byte in an electromagnetic ion trap. “In these traps we cannot string together large numbers of ions and control them simultaneously.”

To solve this problem, the scientists have started to design a quantum computer based on a system of many small registers, which have to be linked. To achieve this, Innsbruck quantum physicists have now developed a revolutionary approach based on a concept formulated by theoretical physicists Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller. In their experiment, the physicists electromagnetically coupled two groups of ions over a distance of about 50 micrometers. Here, the motion of the particles serves as an antenna.

“The particles oscillate like electrons in the poles of a TV antenna and thereby generate an electromagnetic field,” explains Blatt. “If one antenna is tuned to the other one, the receiving end picks up the signal of the sender, which results in coupling.” The energy exchange taking place in this process could be the basis for fundamental computing operations of a quantum computer.
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Old 02-28-2011, 07:52 AM   #2256
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How Powerful is an Apology? http://bit.ly/fpNqdR
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Old 02-28-2011, 01:29 PM   #2257
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http://seedmagazine.com/content/arti...s_version_3.0/

The next giant leap in human evolution may not come from new fields like genetic engineering or artificial intelligence, but rather from appreciating our ancient brains.
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Old 03-01-2011, 06:51 AM   #2258
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...treatment.html

1 in 4 cancer cases missed: GPs send away alarming number of patients, delaying vital treatment
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Old 03-01-2011, 06:59 AM   #2259
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http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-02-...my-occult.html

Why many historians no longer see alchemy as an occult practice

No, wizards have not learned how to transmute lead into gold and they haven't found any rejuvenating elixir of life. But the scholars who write the history of science and technology no longer lump alchemy in with witchcraft as a pseudo-science.

Instead they see alchemy as the proper precursor to modern chemistry.

The modern word "alchemy" comes from the Arabic word "al kemia," which incorporated a spectrum of knowledge of chemical properties and practices from ancient times.

Chemist and historian Lawrence Principe of Johns Hopkins University in Maryland believes that the hardworking alchemists of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, a period stretching across the 14th to the 17th centuries, were defamed by being lumped in with charlatans of the 19th century, quacks that were often depicted wearing eccentric costumes and casting spells.

"We're in an alchemical revolution," said Principe during a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February. Principe said that just in the past 30 years articles about alchemy were being accepted into Isis, one of the leading journals devoted to the history of science. Before that a prohibition on alchemical subjects had been in place.
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:19 AM   #2260
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http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...islamufos.html

Nation of Islam convention to include talk of UFOs

The Nation of Islam, long known for its promotion of black nationalism and self-reliance, now is calling attention to another core belief that perhaps isn't so well-known: the existence of UFOs.
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:48 AM   #2261
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http://www.dangerousminds.net/commen...rs_anonymous_/

Dear Koch Brothers, Tea partiers & union bashers: ‘Anonymous’ would like your attention please
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:43 AM   #2262
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:50 AM   #2263
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http://seedmagazine.com/content/arti...ng_everything/

Nobel Prize-winning chemist Kary Mullis offers a radical new way to treat infectious diseases as the effectiveness of our current antibiotics wanes.

Kary Mullis, a self-proclaimed non-specialist, won the Nobel Prize for developing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique that allows researchers to quickly and cheaply make many copies of single strands of DNA. For the past decade Mullis has been using PCR to create new types of drugs that could soon provide a cure for everything from malaria to anthrax. He tells Seed how he is bridging the gap between disparate scientific fields to devise a radical new way to combat infectious diseases.

Seed: Why do we need to rethink the way we treat infectious diseases?

Kary Mullis: Many pathogens are becoming resistant to our antibiotics. Consider penicillin, for example. We took it from a fungus that grew in the soil and killed bacteria for food. Because of this warfare, some bacteria had developed a resistance via DNA, to penicillin. Over time, they passed this resistance via DNA up to the pathogens that infect our bodies. So now many organisms—like Staphylococcus aureu, the cause of Staph infections—are, in large part, unaffected by penicillin. In this way a lot of bacteria have mutated around our antibiotics.

The standard pharmaceutical response is to go stomping through the jungle trying to find extracts of all the organisms and see if one of them will inhibit the growth of particular bacteria. And that of course will get more and more difficult as time goes on. It is clear that we need another solution.

Seed: What is your solution?

KM: A long time ago they used to speculate that there might be what they called a “silver bullet” for cancer. The idea was that if you could find some molecule that would bind to a cancerous cell but not to a non-cancerous cell and attach a radioactive atom—or some sort of poison—to that molecule, you could cure cancer. It turned out cancer didn’t work that way, but you can take a similar approach to fighting infectious diseases.

My work with PCR allowed for the invention by Craig Tuerk of nucleic aptamers, which are tiny binding molecules that can be designed to attach themselves to harmful bacteria. However, instead of attaching a poison to the other end of the aptamer—as the silver-bullet strategy would call for—I put something on there that is a target for our immune system, a chemical compound with which the immune system is already familiar and to which it is very strongly immune. What you end up with is a drug that will drag this thing to which you are highly immune over to some bacteria you don’t want in your body. And your immune system will attack and kill it.

Seed: Do you have any proof that it works?

KM: Yes, we cured anthrax in mice. If you infect a mouse with anthrax and then wait 24 hours and treat it with a penicillin-type drug, you get about a 40 percent survival rate. But using our drug you get a 100 percent survival rate. Of course, it is unlikely that you are going to get anthrax, but that is sort of a model system.

Seed: It sounds like, at least in theory, the method you have developed could be used to cure any infectious disease.

KM: That’s right. In fact, the science part of it, as far as I’m concerned, is pretty much taken care of. For any particular disease you need a bunch of people to help you because you need organic chemists and infectious disease specialists, but there really aren’t any serious hurdles. A whole lot of people just have to apply the methodology we developed.

Of course, we will need to get through to the big drug companies that can set up human trials and ultimately manufacture the drugs. My reputation will at least get me into their office—though if I make a fool of myself I won’t get to come back.

Seed: Do you think a lot of ideas like yours go overlooked simply because those who have them don’t have your reputation?

KM: Yes, I think supporting early ideas is a really neglected area of science. Where is the foundation that rewards very early ideas that don’t yet have a lab or a company behind them? There are lots of these ideas out there, but nowhere to send them.

What we should be asking about a brand new idea is, “Does it have a chance of ever working?” And if the answer is “yes,” we should consider supporting it. We don’t need to give it a million dollars, just enough money to prove itself. Because today, by the time you get most science prizes, you already have 200 people working on an idea. That’s not when the idea is delicate.

Seed: You have said that you are not a specialist. The non-specialist is an increasingly rare breed in science. What do 
you understand your role to be in today’s highly specialized scientific research community?

KM: I am undisciplined—a loose cannon on deck is one way to talk about me. The positive spin you can put on it is that I can say to one specialist, “You have got some knowledge that, put together with this guy who is an organic chemist and with this guy who knows about influenza in chickens, can accomplish something that none of us could do on our own.” That sounds corny, but it takes years to make those kinds of connections—and doing so requires people wide open with their interests.

It takes a while for me to find people who really understand what I am trying to do and are willing to play in my arena. That is a valuable thing. To be able to collaborate with people is essential, because we can’t do all the things that we can 
think about.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:55 AM   #2264
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http://bigthink.com/ideas/31498?utm_...+Think+Main%29

The 98% of Our DNA Formerly Thought of as “Junk” Is Alive

Dna

What’s the Big Idea?

The 98% of the human genome that was once considered to be useless “junk” actually plays a vital role in making us unique.

Why Is It Groundbreaking?

DNA works by transcribing its genetic code of A’s, C’,s G’s, and T’s into proteins, which in turn participate in virtually every cell process from metabolism to reproduction. But only 2% of the 3 billion base pairs in the human genome actually code for proteins; the rest, formerly known as junk DNA, were thought to be useless. But as it turns out, five hundred stretches of this dark DNA are exactly the same in humans as they are in mice, which means that they have remained unchanged for hundreds of millions of years. Scientists hypothesize that if evolution has chosen to leave these segments alone, they must be doing something vastly important, and recent studies have confirmed their role in regulating and activating genes.

Why Should You Care?

Though non-coding DNA is far from fully understood, it has the potential to transform our understanding of cellular life. Clarifying its role in gene regulation and activation will likely have huge impacts on medicine. For example, many diseases like autism, schizophrenia, and epilepsy cannot be fully explained by our genes, but the cure may lie in this non-coding DNA. This also has important implications for genetic engineering and bioengineering,

___

No way!
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Old 03-03-2011, 11:27 AM   #2265
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http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...+%2F+Energy%29

Thu Mar 3, 2011 12:52pm EST

NEW YORK, March 3 (Reuters) - A natural gas compressor
station in southwestern Pennsylvania was returned to service by
early Thursday after the station caught fire on Tuesday, a
spokesman for MarkWest Energy (MWE.N) said.

There were no injuries from the incident and the company
and state officials did not expect there was any evidence of
environmental damage.

The outage briefly impacted gas producer customers that are
serviced from the station, the spokesman said.
(Reporting by Eileen Moustakis;editing by Sofina Mirza-Reid)
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Old 03-03-2011, 11:29 AM   #2266
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http://www.disinfo.com/2011/03/21st-...ontent=Twitter

21st Century Youths: A Nation of Wimps

Posted by BananaFamine on March 3, 2011

Hara Estroff Marano writes for Psychology Today:

Maybe it’s the cyclist in the park, trim under his sleek metallic blue helmet, cruising along the dirt path… at three miles an hour. On his tricycle.

Or perhaps it’s today’s playground, all-rubber-cushioned surface where kids used to skin their knees. And… wait a minute… those aren’t little kids playing. Their mommies—and especially their daddies—are in there with them, coplaying or play-by-play coaching. Few take it half-easy on the perimeter benches, as parents used to do, letting the kids figure things out for themselves.

wimp

Then there are the sanitizing gels, with which over a third of parents now send their kids to school, according to a recent survey. Presumably, parents now worry that school bathrooms are not good enough for their children.

Consider the teacher new to an upscale suburban town. Shuffling through the sheaf of reports certifying the educational “accommodations” he was required to make for many of his history students, he was struck by the exhaustive, well-written—and obviously costly—one on behalf of a girl who was already proving among the most competent of his ninth-graders. “She’s somewhat neurotic,” he confides, “but she is bright, organized and conscientious—the type who’d get to school to turn in a paper on time, even if she were dying of stomach flu.” He finally found the disability he was to make allowances for: difficulty with Gestalt thinking. The 13-year-old “couldn’t see the big picture.” That cleverly devised defect (what 13-year-old can construct the big picture?) would allow her to take all her tests untimed, especially the big one at the end of the rainbow, the college-worthy SAT.

Behold the wholly sanitized childhood, without skinned knees or the occasional C in history. “Kids need to feel badly sometimes,” says child psychologist David Elkind, professor at Tufts University. “We learn through experience and we learn through bad experiences. Through failure we learn how to cope.”

Messing up, however, even in the playground, is wildly out of style. Although error and experimentation are the true mothers of success, parents are taking pains to remove failure from the equation…

Article continues at Psychology Today.
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Old 03-03-2011, 12:41 PM   #2267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-02-...my-occult.html

Why many historians no longer see alchemy as an occult practice

No, wizards have not learned how to transmute lead into gold and they haven't found any rejuvenating elixir of life. But the scholars who write the history of science and technology no longer lump alchemy in with witchcraft as a pseudo-science.

Instead they see alchemy as the proper precursor to modern chemistry.

The modern word "alchemy" comes from the Arabic word "al kemia," which incorporated a spectrum of knowledge of chemical properties and practices from ancient times.

Chemist and historian Lawrence Principe of Johns Hopkins University in Maryland believes that the hardworking alchemists of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, a period stretching across the 14th to the 17th centuries, were defamed by being lumped in with charlatans of the 19th century, quacks that were often depicted wearing eccentric costumes and casting spells.

"We're in an alchemical revolution," said Principe during a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February. Principe said that just in the past 30 years articles about alchemy were being accepted into Isis, one of the leading journals devoted to the history of science. Before that a prohibition on alchemical subjects had been in place.
As with anything else it is dangerous to lump a large group of people into a bin under one lable and assume they are all the same. Alchemy was to some extend a forebearer of modern science, it was a somewhat systematic approach to trying new things, the goal and the intentions were not always honorable, but certainly it was not without importance.

I believe there are 2 reasons why alchemy has been getting a bad rep, one is that it is often simplified as the hunt for turning base metals into gold which is only possible with high powered particle accelerators, and the other I believe is that at the time there were strong religious and political forces trying to eliminate or control any endevour that challenged nature or the status quo.

The seredipitous discovery of phosphorous is a great example of something that was essentially alchemy.
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:36 PM   #2268
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
http://www.disinfo.com/2011/03/21st-...ontent=Twitter

21st Century Youths: A Nation of Wimps

Posted by BananaFamine on March 3, 2011

Hara Estroff Marano writes for Psychology Today:

Maybe it’s the cyclist in the park, trim under his sleek metallic blue helmet, cruising along the dirt path… at three miles an hour. On his tricycle.

Or perhaps it’s today’s playground, all-rubber-cushioned surface where kids used to skin their knees. And… wait a minute… those aren’t little kids playing. Their mommies—and especially their daddies—are in there with them, coplaying or play-by-play coaching. Few take it half-easy on the perimeter benches, as parents used to do, letting the kids figure things out for themselves.

wimp

Then there are the sanitizing gels, with which over a third of parents now send their kids to school, according to a recent survey. Presumably, parents now worry that school bathrooms are not good enough for their children.

Consider the teacher new to an upscale suburban town. Shuffling through the sheaf of reports certifying the educational “accommodations” he was required to make for many of his history students, he was struck by the exhaustive, well-written—and obviously costly—one on behalf of a girl who was already proving among the most competent of his ninth-graders. “She’s somewhat neurotic,” he confides, “but she is bright, organized and conscientious—the type who’d get to school to turn in a paper on time, even if she were dying of stomach flu.” He finally found the disability he was to make allowances for: difficulty with Gestalt thinking. The 13-year-old “couldn’t see the big picture.” That cleverly devised defect (what 13-year-old can construct the big picture?) would allow her to take all her tests untimed, especially the big one at the end of the rainbow, the college-worthy SAT.

Behold the wholly sanitized childhood, without skinned knees or the occasional C in history. “Kids need to feel badly sometimes,” says child psychologist David Elkind, professor at Tufts University. “We learn through experience and we learn through bad experiences. Through failure we learn how to cope.”

Messing up, however, even in the playground, is wildly out of style. Although error and experimentation are the true mothers of success, parents are taking pains to remove failure from the equation…

Article continues at Psychology Today.
This is why colleges today are overrun by idiots whose lack of work ethic and intellectual ability is made up for by an overinflated sense of entitlement.

If it wasn't for the risk of having to go through an entire and time consuming review process and endless meetings I would institute a policy that every time a grade got challenged and the challenge was incorrect they would an amount of marks equal to what they challenged. If you challenge -5% on an assignenment and you are incorrect you lose extra 5%.
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:07 PM   #2269
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http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...+%2F+Energy%29

Thu Mar 3, 2011 12:52pm EST

NEW YORK, March 3 (Reuters) - A natural gas compressor
station in southwestern Pennsylvania was returned to service by
early Thursday after the station caught fire on Tuesday, a
spokesman for MarkWest Energy (MWE.N) said.

There were no injuries from the incident and the company
and state officials did not expect there was any evidence of
environmental damage.

The outage briefly impacted gas producer customers that are
serviced from the station, the spokesman said.
(Reporting by Eileen Moustakis;editing by Sofina Mirza-Reid)
I just watched "Gasland".

A very eye opening, saddening, apalling..Watching people's tap water catch fire was surreal.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:23 PM   #2270
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Originally Posted by gyldenlove View Post
This is why colleges today are overrun by idiots whose lack of work ethic and intellectual ability is made up for by an overinflated sense of entitlement.

If it wasn't for the risk of having to go through an entire and time consuming review process and endless meetings I would institute a policy that every time a grade got challenged and the challenge was incorrect they would an amount of marks equal to what they challenged. If you challenge -5% on an assignenment and you are incorrect you lose extra 5%.
I agree with that. Ownership.... How do you teach ownership in a disposable culture?
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:24 PM   #2271
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http://www.stealthisknowledge.com/fr...ental-illness/

Is nonconformity and freethinking a mental illness? According to the newest addition of the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), it certainly is. The manual identifies a new mental illness called “oppositional defiant disorder” or ODD. Defined as an “ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behavior,” symptoms include questioning authority, negativity, defiance, argumentativeness, and being easily annoyed.

The DSM-IV is the manual used by psychiatrists to diagnose mental illnesses and, with each new edition, there are scores of new mental illnesses. Are we becoming sicker? Is it getting harder to be mentally healthy? Authors of the DSM-IV say that it’s because they’re better able to identify these illnesses today. Critics charge that it’s because they have too much time on their hands.

New mental illnesses identified by the DSM-IV include arrogance, narcissism, above-average creativity, cynicism, and antisocial behavior. In the past, these were called “personality traits,” but now they’re diseases.

And there are treatments available.

All of this is a symptom of our over-diagnosing and overmedicating culture. In the last 50 years, the DSM-IV has gone from 130 to 357 mental illnesses. A majority of these illnesses afflict children. Although the manual is an important diagnostic tool for the psychiatric industry, it has also been responsible for social changes. The rise in ADD, bipolar disorder, and depression in children has been largely because of the manual’s identifying certain behaviors as symptoms. A Washington Post article observed that, if Mozart were born today, he would be diagnosed with ADD and “medicated into barren normality.”

According to the DSM-IV, the diagnosis guidelines for identifying oppositional defiant disorder are for children, but adults can just as easily suffer from the disease. This should give any freethinking American reason for worry.
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:22 AM   #2272
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http://scienceblogs.com/neurophiloso...ophilosophy%29

Artificial nerve grafts made from spider silk

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In the new study, Vogt's group dissected 6cm lengths from the small veins in pigs' legs, washed them and stripped away most of the endothelial cells from their inner walls. They then harvested dragline silk from the golden silk spider Nephila clavipes and pulled the silk through the de-cellularized veins, until it filled about one quarter of their diameter. Using adult sheep, the researchers removed a 6cm length of the tibial nerve in the leg. In one group of animals, the gap was bridged with the spider silk constructs; in another, the section of nerve that had been removed was replaced in reverse orientation.

Defects in the animals' gait became apparent immediately after the surgery - the hind limb was partially paralyzed and flexed abnormally. But within three weeks there was a significant improvement, with both groups of animals being able to stand properly. By four months, the animals could stand upright on both hind limbs, the hind limbs moved in co-ordination with one another during walking, and there was no obvious difference in strength between the operated and unoperated limbs.

Ten months after surgery, the sheep were killed and their regenerated nerves examined under the microscope. In both groups of animals, the severed nerve fibres had regrown into the nerve grafts to bridge the 6cm gap; Schwann cells had migrated into the grafts and wrapped themselves around the entire length of the regenerated nerves; and the sodium channels required for generating nerve impulses were distributed irregularly along the fibres. This shows that myelination had occurred properly, with the formation of Nodes of Ranvier, the regular gaps in the myelin sheath at which the sodium channels normally cluster. No trace of residual spider silk was detected in the experimental animals, and there was no sign of inflammation at the repair site, indicating that the silk fibres were absorbed subtly without adverse effects.

These findings could have important applications in reconstructive nerve surgery. This is the first time that a large animal model has been used to study nerve regeneration, and the study is the first in which a defect longer than 2cm in length has been successfully repaired. The spider silk constructs enhanced nerve regeneration at least as effectively as the sheeps' own nerves, and would be advantageous in the clinic, because transplanting large lengths of a patient's own nerves is unfeasible.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:03 AM   #2273
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http://www.kurzweilai.net/quantum-an...o-memory-cells

‘Quantum antennas’ enable exchange of quantum information between two memory cells

An Austrian research group led by physicist Rainer Blatt suggests a fundamentally novel architecture for quantum computation. They have experimentally demonstrated quantum antennas, which enable the exchange of quantum information between two separate memory cells located on a computer chip. This offers new opportunities to build practical quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the scientific journal Nature.

Six years ago scientists at the University of Innsbruck realized the first quantum byte — a quantum computer with eight entangled quantum particles; a record that still stands. “Nevertheless, to make practical use of a quantum computer that performs calculations, we need a lot more quantum bits,” says Prof. Rainer Blatt, who, with his research team at the Institute for Experimental Physics, created the first quantum byte in an electromagnetic ion trap. “In these traps we cannot string together large numbers of ions and control them simultaneously.”

To solve this problem, the scientists have started to design a quantum computer based on a system of many small registers, which have to be linked. To achieve this, Innsbruck quantum physicists have now developed a revolutionary approach based on a concept formulated by theoretical physicists Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller. In their experiment, the physicists electromagnetically coupled two groups of ions over a distance of about 50 micrometers. Here, the motion of the particles serves as an antenna.

“The particles oscillate like electrons in the poles of a TV antenna and thereby generate an electromagnetic field,” explains Blatt. “If one antenna is tuned to the other one, the receiving end picks up the signal of the sender, which results in coupling.” The energy exchange taking place in this process could be the basis for fundamental computing operations of a quantum computer.
Quantum computing is going to be groundbreaking. Theoretically you could move the second particle to the other side of the universe and have a "live feed" by using their movement to send a signal.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:09 AM   #2274
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Quantum computing is going to be groundbreaking. Theoretically you could move the second particle to the other side of the universe and have a "live feed" by using their movement to send a signal.
http://www.kurzweilai.net/new-magnet...ntum-computing

New Magnetic Resonance Technique Could Revolutionise Quantum Computing
March 8, 2011

Source: The physics ArXiv blog — Mar 7, 2011
[+]

Graphic: M.S. Grinolds et al.

Harvard University scientists have develop a miniaturized MRI device that could lead to large-scale quantum computers.

The did it by placing a powerful magnet at the scanning tip of an atomic force microscope to create a powerful magnetic field gradient in a volume of space just a few nanometers across. That allows them to stimulate and control the magnetic resonance of single electrons in a way that could easily be adapted for quantum computation.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1103.0546: Quantum Control Of Proximal Spins Using Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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Old 03-08-2011, 08:11 AM   #2275
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http://www.scientificamerican.com/bl...nce-2011-03-07

You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential
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