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Old 01-07-2009, 12:23 PM   #1376
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http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/l...cle5439805.ece

Scientists discover true love

SCIENTISTS have discovered true love. Brain scans have proved that a small number of couples can respond with as much passion after 20 years as most people exhibit only in the first flush of love.

The findings overturn the conventional view that love and sexual desire peak at the start of a relationship and then decline as the years pass.

A team from Stony Brook University in New York scanned the brains of couples who had been together for 20 years and compared them with those of new lovers. They found that about one in 10 of the mature couples exhibited the same chemical reactions when shown photographs of their loved ones as people commonly do in the early stages of a relationship.

Previous research suggested that the first stages of romantic love, a rollercoaster ride of mood swings and obsessions that psychologists call limerence, start to fade within 15 months. After 10 years the chemical tide has ebbed away.

The scans of some of the long-term couples, however, revealed that elements of limerence mature, enabling them to enjoy what a new report calls “intensive companionship and sexual liveliness”.

The researchers nicknamed the couples “swans” because they have similar mental “love maps” to animals that mate for life such as swans, voles and grey foxes.

The reactions of the swans to pictures of their beloved were identified on MRI brain scans as a burst of pleasure-producing dopamine more commonly seen in couples who are gripped in the first flush of lust.

“The findings go against the traditional view of romance – that it drops off sharply in the first decade – but we are sure it’s real,” said Arthur Aron, a psychologist at Stony Brook.

Previous research had laid out the “fracture points” in relationships as 12-15 months, three years and the infamous seven-year itch.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:23 PM   #1377
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http://www.alphagalileo.org/index.cf...98&ez_search=1

European researchers can now attach hyperlinks to pictures you take using your mobile phone. It offers the prospect of new ways to discover, engage and navigate your surroundings.

You wake up in a strange city with no recollection of how you got there and no information about where you are. Demonstrating nerves of steel, you calmly pick up your mobile phone and take a picture of the streetscape.

Quickly, the picture comes alive with hyperlinks, offering the names of the buildings, monuments and streetscape features that appear in the photograph. The hyperlinks lead to information about the history, services and context of all the features in the photograph. You have just hyperlinked your reality.

That scenario might be a little far-fetched, but the technology exists and is no figment of some fevered imagination. This is not a gee-whiz gadget invented by Q for the next James Bond movie; this is a working technology just developed by European researchers. It could be coming to a phone near you, and soon.

This, as the marketing types say, is a game changer. It develops a completely new interface paradigm that meshes web-technology with the real world. It is big and fresh like Apple’s game-changing multi-touch interface for the iPhone. But it goes much further and has implications that are much more profound.

The MOBVIS platform completely rewrites the rules for navigation, exploration and interaction with your physical environment. It identifies the buildings from a photograph you take in an urban environment and then places icons on points of interest.

Technology that pays attention

Then you simply click on the icon, using a cursor or, more frequently, a touch-screen phone, and the MOBVIS system will provide information on the history, art, architecture or even the menu, if it is a restaurant, of the building in question.

MOBVIS stands for mobile attentive interfaces in urban scenarios and it is the brainchild of the EU-funded MOBVIS project, a team of engineers and scientists who have successfully demonstrated the technology working in a real environment, with real users unconnected to the project.

The project’s work is all the more remarkable because image recognition technology has long been pregnant with promise, but seemed to suffer from an unending labour.

Now MOBVIS has not only developed image recognition; it has also developed compelling applications for the technology; and it has done so in the most striking and visible manner by adapting it to the world’s most ubiquitous technology: the mobile phone.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:25 PM   #1378
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http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/05/us...mant.html?_r=1

Activist Unmasks Himself as Federal Informant in G.O.P. Convention Case

When the scheduled federal trial begins this month for two Texas men who were arrested during the Republican National Convention on charges of making and possessing Molotov cocktails, one of the major witnesses against them will be a community activist who acted as a government informant.

Brandon Darby, an organizer from Austin, Tex., made the news public himself, announcing in an open letter posted on Dec. 30 on Indymedia.org that he had worked as an informant, most recently at last year’s Republican convention in St. Paul.

“The simple truth is that I have chosen to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” wrote Mr. Darby, who gained prominence as a member of Common Ground Relief, a group that helped victims of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

He added, “I strongly stand behind my choices in this matter.”

Mr. Darby’s revelations caused shock and indignation in the activist community, with people in various groups and causes accusing him of betrayal.

“The emerging truth about Darby’s malicious involvement in our communities is heart-breaking and utterly ground-shattering,” said the Austin Informant Working Group, a collection of activists from the city who worked with Mr. Darby. “Through the history of our struggles for a better world, infiltrators and informants have acted as tools for the forces of misery in disrupting and derailing our movements.”

Mr. Darby’s letter answered lingering questions in the case of the two Texas men, David McKay and Bradley Crowder, both also from Austin. They are scheduled to go on trial in Minnesota on Jan. 26, and if convicted on all counts, each faces a prison sentence of up to 30 years.

Neither the United States attorney’s office in Minnesota nor the F.B.I. would comment on Mr. Darby’s announcement.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:27 PM   #1379
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I'm not really sure if this is THE GUY in this anthrax deal:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/04/us/04anthrax.html?em

Portrait Emerges of Anthrax Suspect’s Troubled Life

Nearly seven years and many millions of dollars later, after an investigation that included both path-breaking science and costly bungling, the F.B.I. concluded that Dr. Haigwood had been right: the anthrax killer had been at the investigators’ side all along. Prosecutors said they believed they had the evidence to prove that Dr. Ivins alone carried out the attacks, but their assertions immediately met with skepticism among some scientists, lawmakers and co-workers of Dr. Ivins.

With the F.B.I. preparing to close the case, The New York Times has taken the deepest look so far at the investigation, speaking to dozens of Dr. Ivins’s colleagues and friends, reading hundreds of his e-mail messages, interviewing former bureau investigators and anthrax experts, reviewing court records, and obtaining, for the first time, police reports on his suicide in July, including a lengthy recorded interview with his wife.

That examination found that unless new evidence were to surface, the enormous public investment in the case would appear to have yielded nothing more persuasive than a strong hunch, based on a pattern of damning circumstances, that Dr. Ivins was the perpetrator.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:27 PM   #1380
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http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/04/op...ml?ref=opinion

The End of the Financial World as We Know It
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:30 PM   #1381
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http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/jan09/7127

Loser: Hot or Not? By Erico Guizzo
First Published January 2009
BlackLight Power says it's developing a revolutionary energy source—and it won't let the laws of physics stand in its way

Imagine that you could make hydrogen atoms do something that quantum mechanics says they can’t: slip into an energy state below the ground state, the collapse releasing 100 times as much energy as you’d get by just burning the hydrogen. If you could harness the heat to produce power, using hydrogen from water as fuel, you’d consume no oil, create no fumes, and solve the problems of energy and global warming forever.

Of course, first you’d have to overturn a century’s worth of physical theory, prove your point experimentally, and demonstrate its feasibility in a prototype power-producing system. Yet this is precisely what a company called BlackLight Power says it has done. The company, based near Princeton, N.J., has raised US $60 million, equipped massive labs, hired two dozen employees, gotten some high-profile executives to serve on its board, and attracted a devoted following of fans to online discussion boards.

Last year BlackLight announced that it had a prototype reactor capable of putting out 50 kilowatts of thermal power using a tiny amount of hydrogen. The company said that the device releases energy in one short burst and that it’s working to make the reaction continuous. It also said it planned to scale up for pilot operation sometime this year, estimating that its technology could produce electricity for under 2 cents per kilowatt-hour. That’s on a par with nuclear and coal power plants and considerably better than gas and petroleum plants.

Is this real, or just fodder for a science-fiction TV show?

Ask experts in atomic physics and you’ll hear that a new form of hydrogen is just fantasy.

“This is scientific nonsense—there is no state of hydrogen lower than the ground state,” says Wolfgang Ketterle, an MIT scientist and a Nobel Prize laureate in physics. “Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and it’s had time enough to find its ground state.”

Anthony Leggett, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and also a Nobel laureate, says that quantum mechanics is “consistent with just about everything we know about atomic physics, so the onus is firmly on anyone who wants to discard it to prove his case.” He adds, “I don’t see that [BlackLight] has got anywhere near doing this.”

But turn to Randell Mills, the founder, chairman, chief executive, and president of BlackLight Power, and he’ll tell you that this lower-energy hydrogen, which he calls hydrino, is very real indeed.

“We produce hydrino on demand,” he tells IEEE Spectrum, adding that his team has isolated and characterized hydrino’s properties using spectroscopy and has even created hydrino-rich materials it can provide for analysis.

Mills is unfazed by the criticism, having faced down the physics establishment since he first put forward his hydrino theory some 20 years ago. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, he veered into physics after taking some courses at MIT in the late 1980s. His theory has been evolving since then. Not only does it explicitly reject quantum mechanics as it is currently understood, it also attempts to explain physics and chemistry “from the scale of quarks to cosmos,” as Mills puts it. Unlike quantum theory’s statistical approach, his theory is completely deterministic.

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Old 01-07-2009, 12:32 PM   #1382
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7811730.stm

Huge undersea 'wall' discovered

A giant rock formation resembling a city wall has been discovered under the Taiwan Strait.

The 220m stretch of basalt rock was found by biodiversity researcher Jeng Ming-hsiou.

He said it was likely to have been formed by a volcanic eruption up to 1,800 years ago.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asi...ic/7811730.stm
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:32 PM   #1383
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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...c-1225802.html

New powers for police to hack your PC (UK)

Civil liberties groups raise alarm over extension of surveillance without warrant
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:33 PM   #1384
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http://www.sciencenews.org/view/gene...nergy_universe

New window on the high-energy universe
New telescope finds that the high-energy share of gamma-ray bursts arrive at Earth significantly later than the low-energy portion
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:34 PM   #1385
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http://www.popularmechanics.com/scie...h/4297513.html

Can a Kind of Ancient Charcoal Put the Brakes on Global Warming?
Biochar was first created and used thousands of years ago to help plants grow. Researchers have found that this charcoal-like substance traps carbon and is a renewable source of fuel. Nine countries are pouring research dollars into the charcoal-like substance to see if it can sequester carbon, improve the soil and produce biofuels all at once—on an economically competitive scale. Could this ancient fertilizer really put a dent on global warming?
By Jeremy Jacquot
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:35 PM   #1386
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http://chronicle.com/free/v55/i18/18b00601.htm

The Nature-Nurture Debate, Redux

Genetic research finally makes its way into the thinking of sociologists

If sociologists ignore genes, will other academics — and the wider world — ignore sociology?

Some in the discipline are telling their peers just that. With study after study finding that all sorts of personal characteristics are heritable — along with behaviors shaped by those characteristics — a see-no-gene perspective is obsolete.

Nor, these scholars argue, is it reasonable to concede that genes play some role but then to loftily assert that geneticists and the media overstate that role and to go on conducting studies as if genes did not exist. How, exactly, do genes shape human lives, interact with environmental forces, or get overpowered by those forces? "We do ourselves a disservice if we don't engage in those arguments," says Jason Schnittker, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. "If we stay on the ropes, people from a different perspective, with a more extreme view, will be making them."
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:36 PM   #1387
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http://www.newcriterion.com/articles...elativism-3981

Introduction: The dictatorship of relativism

by Roger Kimball

An introduction our symposium "The Dictatorship of Relativism: Who Will Stand Up for Western Values Now?”
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:38 PM   #1388
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http://www.standpointmag.co.uk/node/723/full

Timing is Everything

Time is the stuff of music: music manipulates our experience of time; it plays with the rhythm of experience; it stretches and complicates our relationship to the passing of time. If the world of physics is a space-time continuum, music is a pitch-time continuum. We use spatial metaphors to express our experience of frequency - notes are higher and lower, something expressed formally in staff notation, and deeply inscribed in our experience of music as performers and listeners. A large interval between two notes is a gulf to be stretched over. The quintessential musical form, melody, as it moves up and down in pitch space, over time, is a sort of quasi-miraculous bridging of the gap between the abandoned past, the ungraspable present and the as-yet-to-be-achieved, utterly unreal future. We grasp it and, as we do so, time is attended to and made palpable and affective.

It's no coincidence that the great age of music as metaphysics - Schopenhauer above all - coincided with the construction of larger and more complex forms in classical music. These brought a specialised form of rationality, musical rationality, to the subjective experience of time, through both the eked out, endless melody of Wagner, and the great symphonic structures of Bruckner and Mahler. Nineteenth-century music's ambitions for itself were in many ways as cosmic as the Pythagorean vision of an art form in tune with the construction of the universe itself, the music of the spheres. It wanted to mirror the ebb and flow of being itself.

While this all seems impossibly grandiose in a postmodern age, classical music still has the capacity to generate visions of the sublime. Here is Daniel Barenboim, recently quoted in the International Herald Tribune: "Since every note produced by a human being has a human quality, there is a feeling of death with the end of each one, and through that experience there is a transcendence of all the emotions that these notes can have in their short lives; in a way, one is in direct contact with timelessness."
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:39 PM   #1389
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http://www.healthmad.com/Alternative...eatment.434231

Maple Syrup and Baking Powder - mixture used to fight tumors.

The Remedy - Maple Syrup and Baking Powder (Bicarbonate of soda)

* Mix 1 part baking soda to 3 parts maple syrup
* Heat rigorously in a pan for 5 minutes
* Take two teaspoons of the mixture per day for the first week and then one teaspoon per day for weeks two and three - the remedy should not be continued after three weeks

Try to get aluminium free baking powder (from organic / health food shops) and pure 100% Grade B maple syrup.

Dr Mark Sircus has examined the results and comments as follows:-

"cancer cells gobble up sugar so when you encourage the intake of sugar it's like sending in a Trojan horse. The sugar is not going to encourage the growth of the cancer colonies because the baking soda is going to kill the cells before they have a chance to grow"

"The treatment is a combination of pure, 100% maple syrup [bulk Grade B from the health food store] and baking soda and was first reported on the Cancer Tutor site. When mixed and heated together, the maple syrup and baking soda bind together. The maple syrup targets cancer cells (which consume 15 times more glucose than normal cells) and the baking soda, which is dragged into the cancer cell by the maple syrup, being very alkaline forces a rapid shift in pH killing the cell."

An almost identical remedy has been suggested by Italian Dr Simoncini - who claims to treat cancer as if it were a fungus.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:41 PM   #1390
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http://www.entertainmentandshowbiz.c...2-200901048600

Archaeology : Archaeologists find lost city of ‘cloud people’ in Peru

* Posted by ranjankul in Other News
* 0 Comments

Archaeologists have discovered a lost city carved into the Andes Mountains in Peru by the mysterious Chachapoya tribe, which is also known as the ‘cloud people’.

According to a report in the Telegraph, the settlement covers some 12 acres and is perched on a mountainside in the remote Jamalca district of Utcubamba province in the northern jungles
of Peru’s Amazon.

The buildings, found on the Pachallama peak, are in remarkably good condition, estimated to be over 1,000 years old and comprised of the traditional round stone houses built by the Chachapoya, the ‘Cloud Forest People’.

The area is completely overgrown with the jungle now covering much of the settlement, but explorers found the walls of the buildings and rock paintings on a cliff face.

The remote nature of the site appears to have protected the site from looters as archaeologists found ceramics and undisturbed burial sites.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:42 PM   #1391
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http://www.physorg.com/news150388664.html

Effect of subliminal marketing greater than thought
January 5th, 2009 in General Science / Other

(PhysOrg.com) -- Marketing statements influence us subliminally more than was ever assumed. Even when you are not aware of being exposed to advertising material, it can still affect your actions. This emerged from research by Marieke Fransen of the University of Twente, Netherlands, who obtained her doctorate from the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences on 19 December.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:48 PM   #1392
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http://www.fjexpeditions.com/frameset/Bagsc.htm

Bagnold's Stone Circle



"In a small basin in the hills we came the next day (27th October, 1930) upon a circle 27 feet (8.5 metres) in diameter of thin slabs of sandstone, 18 to 24 inches high. Half were lying prone, but the rest were still vertical in the sand. There was no doorway or other sign of orientation, and though we searched within and without the circle, no implements could be found. I understand that other similar circles have been found in the neighborhood of the Gilf Kebir."

Major R.A.Bagnold, Journeys in the Libyan Desert 1929 and 1930,
The Georgaphical Journal, Vol. LXXVIII No. 1. (July 1931)]

Bagnold and his party made their discovery purely by chance, as the low structure is only visible from a few hundred metres. Bagnold did mark the circle on his map acompanying the Geographical Journal article, however on the scale of 1:10 million the half milimetre dot represents an area 5 kilometres in diameter, plus of course any error in Bagnold's position estimate. It was like looking for a needle in a haystack when we set out to locate the circle in march 2001. However luck was with us, after rounding a low hill suddenly the circle right in front, though the GPS still showed six kilometres to go, based on the position plotted from Bagnold's map.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:49 PM   #1393
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0105120310.htm

Mystery Of South American Trophy Heads Solved

ScienceDaily (Jan. 6, 2009) — The mystery of why ancient South American peoples who created the mysterious Nazca Lines also collected human heads as trophies has long puzzled scholars who theorize the heads may have been used in fertility rites, taken from enemies in battle or associated with ancestor veneration.

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Old 01-07-2009, 12:50 PM   #1394
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http://web.utanet.at/mahain/Pyramids_in_China.htm

Pyramids in China

The "White Pyramid" discovered!

It is the Maoling Mausoleum!

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Old 01-07-2009, 12:51 PM   #1395
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http://www.physorg.com/news148829398.html

Passage graves from an astronomical perspective

Shown here is the passage grave "Nordenhoj" at Kaerby near Kalundborg in Denmark. Credit: The National Museum of Denmark



Passage graves are mysterious barrows from the Stone Age. New research from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen indicates that the Stone Age graves' orientation in the landscape could have an astronomical explanation. The Danish passage graves are most likely oriented according to the path of the full moon, perhaps even according to the full moon immediately before a lunar eclipse. The results are published in the scientific journal Acta Archaeologica.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:53 PM   #1396
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http://www.louthleader.co.uk/news/UP...cle.4847433.jp

UPDATE PLUS VIDEO FOOTAGE: Tentacle UFO spotted night before carnage at Conisholme wind farm

Published Date: 06 January 2009
TUESDAY 13.20pm -
ENGINEERS from Ecotricity are working to establish how a 20m blade mysteriously fell off a turbine at Conisholme wind farm - but residents have their own conclusions.
It is believed the a blade fell off the 89m turbine and another was left badly bent on Sunday January 4.

Speculation has continued amongst residents in Conisholme and the surrounding villages with some saying they saw strange flashing tentacle shaped lights above the wind farm on the night before it happened.

Mr John Harrison, Saltfleetby described how on Saturday night, January 3 he looked out of his landing window to see a 'massive ball of light' with 'tentacles going right down to the ground' over Conisholme wind farm.

"It was huge" he said "At first I thought it must have been a hole where the moon was shining through but then I saw the tentacles – it looked just like an octopus.

"It was an incredible site; I have never seen anything like it before. I have no idea what it was, all I can say is what I saw".

And although many believe the incident is an isolated one, reports of damage to wind turbines appear to be more common than people think:

* April 2005: A 40m blade of a turbine on a wind farm in Berwickshire, Scotland suddenly shattered. The failure was blamed on strong winds and icy weather conditions.

* November 2006: The tip of the rotor blade of a turbine in Oldenburg, Germany was ripped off following a sudden gust of wind throwing it into a field 200m away.

* January 2007: A family narrowly avoided tragedy when a 16ft blade spun off a wind turbine and crashed through the roof of their home in Belfast.

* July 2008: A giant wind turbine between Sheffield and Rotherham was shut down using a controlled deconstruction and the blades fell to the ground after cracks in the blades appeared.

* December 2008: Shards of ice were catapulted from an 80m high turbine in Peterborough leaving residents fearing for their safety.


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Old 01-07-2009, 12:54 PM   #1397
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http://ufor.blogspot.com/2009/01/why...y-anthony.html

WHY ET HAS TO BE HUMANOID by Anthony Bragalia

Space Shuttle Columbia Astronaut and physicist Dr. Ulrich Walter makes this case very well in a 2004 paper. He goes against traditional scientific thought on the matter of what ET would look like. He says of the visiting alien form, "No matter from which angle you approach the problem, the only realistic approach seems to be the variant realised by the human race." He examines in fine detail why the basis of such evolutionary life has be be carbon chemistry, or organic chemistry. This is why ET cannot be that much different from earthly life with regard to its basic substances. Space-faring creatures would require the same stereoscopic vision and the same hand-eye coordination as humans. Dr. Walter says that (unless artificially created) such sentient ET life would be made of "flesh" (agglomerate of reproducing aqueous cells) and "blood" (a liquid which tranports needed substances.) The "flesh" and "blood" of a humanoid. Dr. Walter concludes that ET's functional counterparts are similar to ours, and that "the only question that remains is where these parts are located."

When another child was asked, "What does ET look like?" he replied: "They can be anything." He too is right. If the universe teems with sentient life, then there are beings that are at once ancient and advanced. And those that survive, adapt. Over the eons, technology has no doubt enabled them to appear as they wish. And if something is sufficiently Alien, it may appear as anything. Or it might not even wish to be noticed as "living" or recognized as sentient at all. Their form is likely whatever they desire it to be. It is "self-engineered." Aliens who visit us would have to be unfathomably adaptable- with the technology to change form to exploit all habitat. Just as their craft (and the material from which they are comprised) can change state, so too can ET's appearance.

Though they appear as they wish- ET's core nature remains humanoid. The reason that their form is so familiar is because we are from the same source. We share ultimate origin. And one day we will do what they do. The truth is that Man and Visitor both reflect the infinite image of God- rendering meaningless the very use of the term "Alien."
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:54 PM   #1398
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http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...monuments.html

Largest Marine Reserve Declared; Home to Mariana Trench
Dina Cappiello in Washington, D.C.
Associated Press
January 6, 2009

The home of a giant land crab, a sunken island ringed by pink-colored coral, and equatorial waters teeming with sharks and other predators have been designated national marine monuments by U.S. President George W. Bush in the largest marine conservation effort in history. (See photos.)

The three areas—totaling some 195,274 square miles (505,757 square kilometers)—include the Mariana Trench and the waters and corals surrounding three uninhabited islands in the Northern Mariana Islands, Rose Atoll in American Samoa, and seven islands strung along the equator in the central Pacific Ocean.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:55 PM   #1399
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http://www.nrdc.org/wildlife/marine/sonar.asp

Protecting Whales from Dangerous Sonar
NRDC's campaign to regulate harmful Navy sonar systems is headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:55 PM   #1400
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...er-months.html

Three-second memory myth: Fish show they can remember things for up to five months

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 11:53 AM on 07th January 2009

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Their brain power is at best shallow. Or so we thought. But scientists believe fish may have hidden depths.

The creatures said to have a mere three-second memory span can actually recall information for up to five months.

Scientists found that fish trained to respond to certain sounds in captivity still reacted months later when they heard them in the wild.
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