The Orange Mane -  a Denver Broncos Fan Community  

Go Back   The Orange Mane - a Denver Broncos Fan Community > Jibba Jabba > War, Religion and Politics Thread
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Chat Room Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-24-2008, 11:10 AM   #976
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://electricchildren.com/wordpress/?p=279

Dalai Lama Unleashes Revolutionary New Reincarnation Techniques
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:12 AM   #977
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...ss-comes-from/

The standard model of physics got it right when it predicted where the mass of ordinary matter comes from, according to a massive new computational effort. Particle physics explains that the bulk of atoms is made up of protons and neutrons, which are themselves composed of smaller particles known as quarks, which in turn are bound by gluons. The odd thing is this: the mass of gluons is zero and the mass of quarks [accounts for] only five percent. Where, therefore, is the missing 95 percent? [AFP]

The answer, according to theory, is that the energy from the interactions between quarks and gluons accounts for the excess mass (because as Einstein’s famous E=mc˛ equation proved, energy and mass are equivalent). Gluons are the carriers of the strong nuclear force that binds three quarks together to form one proton or neutron; these gluons are constantly popping into existence and disappearing again. The energy of these vacuum fluctuations has to be included in the total mass of the proton and neutron [New Scientist]. The new study finally crunched the numbers on how much energy is created in these fluctuations and confirmed the theory, but it took a supercomputer over a year to do so.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:13 AM   #978
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

Cool ****!

http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media...11a/index.html
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:18 AM   #979
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.naturalnews.com/024872.html

Rat Poison Chemical Found in Ingredient List For HPV Vaccine
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:20 AM   #980
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...ze-each-other/

Black and white Masonic groups officially recognize each other




http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...ights-templar/

Police investigated allegations schoolgirl was ritually sacrificed by White Knights Templar
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:20 AM   #981
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2...htm?list888306

Discovered: Cosmic Rays from a Mysterious, Nearby Object
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:30 AM   #982
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/node/146657

Premiere: NASA [ft. Tom Waits and Kool Keith]: "Spacious Thoughts" [Stream]

Kool Keith and Tom Waits, together at last. The pairing between the rapper and the brawler/bawler/bastard doesn't sound much more natural than you'd expect on "Spacious Thoughts", the first track from the forthcoming debut album by Squeak E. Clean (aka director Spike Jonze's brother Sam Spiegel) and DJ Zegon (aka Ze Gonzales) as NASA. But it's an intriguing experiment nonetheless. Kool Keith shares some colorful reminiscences about the stars-- "I was up there watchin' James Brown's pockets/ Stuffed with Jolly Ranchers/ When the NFL had the Rams in Los Angeles"-- over a haunted, horn-bolstered psych-funk groove. Waits' ragged howl interjects in between Keith verses, carrying in its gale some archetypally Waitsian stuff like, you know, strangling a monkey with a clock, boarding a night train, or how "they say the moon, it smells just like a cherry bomb." It's well worth a listen even if just to hear Waits utter the words "ghetto booty."
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:37 AM   #983
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27787506/

1,300-year-old Islamic note may solve mystery
Inscription could answer Qur'an question vexing historians for centuries
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:38 AM   #984
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...irmingham.html

Helicopter in dramatic near-miss with 'sinister' UFO 1,500ft above Birmingham
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:38 AM   #985
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle5209714.ece

Sofia Archaeologists are working on a Thracian bronze chariot, which they unearthed near the village of Karanovo in southeastern Bulgaria. More than 10,000 Thracian burial mounds are scattered across central and southeastern Bulgaria, which is considered to have been the home of the ancient society that lived in the region between 4000BC and AD300.

Digging in the mound near Karanovo was begun because local authorities feared looting. The chariot had probably been buried in the tomb of a rich man in line with the Thracian belief that belongings accompanied the dead into the afterlife, archaeologists said. “It is an ancient four-wheel chariot with a richly ornamented framework and a yoke of figured bronze,” Veselin Ignatov told national radio. (AFP)
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:39 AM   #986
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.dailytech.com/New+Wind+Tu...ticle13472.htm

New Wind Turbine Generator Ditches Mechanical Transmission, Ups Efficiency 50 Percent
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:40 AM   #987
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1120073115.htm

Common Cold Virus Came From Birds About 200 Years Ago

ScienceDaily (Nov. 20, 2008) — A virus that causes cold-like symptoms in humans originated in birds and may have crossed the species barrier around 200 years ago, according to a new article published in the Journal of General Virology. Scientists hope their findings will help us understand how potentially deadly viruses emerge in humans.


__

Was it the dodo?
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:40 AM   #988
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7741998.stm


Hairspray linked to birth defect
Hairspray
Hairspray exposure was linked to a condition called hypospadias

Boys born to women exposed to hairspray in the workplace may have a higher risk of being born with a genital defect.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:41 AM   #989
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...deodorant.html

Boy, 12, collapsed and died after 'using too much Lynx deodorant'
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:41 AM   #990
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.theage.com.au/world/littl...1122-6ehp.html

'Little geniuses' forced to face harsh realities

* November 23, 2008

Are your children all perfect little angels? A generation has been raised to overestimate their abilities.

THEY are calling them the "smug generation". These are the children of American baby boomers who are inculcated by their parents with such faith in their own brilliance that they are shattered in later life to discover that they are not actually much good at anything.

It is, of course, impossible to get things right as a parent. In the old days, it was common, especially in America, for parents to assume the worst of their children and to believe that the only way to bring them success in life was to launch them unprotected upon the world to make their own way. Such parents would unquestioningly accept the verdict of school teachers on their children's abilities, however derogatory, and concur with enthusiasm in their efforts to discipline them. This could make children feel unloved and unappreciated.

Now, according to research by US psychologists, it is the other way round. Modern parents praise and flatter their children to such an extent that they believe they are the cat's whiskers and destined to rise effortlessly to the top of every tree. Teenagers today think they are bound to outshine their parents in all fields - as workers, spouses and as parents themselves - and so succumb to depression when it turns out that they are mediocre at everything.

The researchers found that there are no grounds for these feelings of superiority. Trawling through the results of previous surveys, they concluded that modern teenagers work less hard and are generally less competent than their parents at the same age. They are just a great deal more pleased with themselves.

One wonders why parents have come so blatantly to mislead their children as to their own abilities and prospects. They may believe, not without reason, that it is important to give children confidence in themselves. But maybe it is also dissatisfaction with their own achievements - stumbling careers, broken marriages and so on - that makes them want to believe that their children are better than they are. If you are unhappy with yourself and what you have done in life, you can at least take comfort in the belief that you have spawned a genius.

Another factor is the widespread modern belief that everyone is a victim. If a child does badly at school, it is the school's fault. If he (or she) falls foul of the school authorities and is disciplined, he is being used as a scapegoat. What is unacceptable is the idea that the child in question is in any way flawed, for that could only reflect badly on his parents.

Unwillingness to face reality as far as children are concerned is not, however, an exclusively modern phenomenon. I had a wonderful mother who always said that her four children were all "perfect" in their different ways and capable of more or less anything. We loved her for it, but I do in retrospect think that it gave me a skewed idea of my own abilities and made me idler than I would otherwise have been. As I say, parents can't win.

GUARDIAN
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:42 AM   #991
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...L&type=science

Thousands pick up free vegetables on Colo. farm

Sunday, November 23, 2008

(11-23) 11:46 PST Platteville, Colo. (AP) --

A farm couple got a huge surprise when they opened their fields to anyone who wanted to pick up free vegetables left over after the harvest — 40,000 people showed up.

Joe and Chris Miller's fields were picked so clean Saturday that a second day of gleaning — the ancient practice of picking up leftover food in farm fields — was canceled Sunday.

"Overwhelmed is putting it mildly," Chris Miller said. "People obviously need food."

She said she expected 5,000 to 10,000 people would show up Saturday to collect free potatoes, carrots and leeks. Instead, an estimated 11,000 vehicles snaked around cornfields and backed up more than two miles. About 30 acres of the 600-acre farm 37 miles north of Denver became a parking lot.

Some people parked their cars along two nearby highways to take to the field with sacks, wagons and barrels.

"Everybody is so depressed about the economy," said Sandra Justice of Greeley, who works at a technology company. "This was a pure party. Everybody having a a great time getting something for free."

Justice and her mother and son picked 10 bags of vegetables.

Miller said they opened the farm to the free public harvest for the first time this year after hearing reports of food being stolen from churches. It was meant as a thank you for customers.

Farm operations manager Dave Patterson said that in previous years the Millers allowed schoolchildren and some church groups to come to the farm during the fall to harvest their own food.

He estimated some 600,000 pounds of produce was harvested Saturday.

Weld County sheriff's deputies helped direct traffic and the Colorado State Patrol issued citations for cars illegally parked on the side of the road.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:43 AM   #992
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articl...e&topic=latest

'Sneakey' photos could steal your keys

US scientists have developed a software algorithm that creates a physical key based solely on a picture, regardless of angle or distance.

The project, called Sneakey, was developed to warn people about the dangers of haphazardly placing keys in the open or posting images of them online.

"People will post pictures with their credit cards but with the name and number greyed out," says Professor Stefan Savage of University of California, San Diego (UCSD), who helped develop the software. "They should have the same sensitivity with their keys."

When Savage and his students searched online photo sharing websites, such as Flickr, they found thousands of photos of keys with enough definition to replicate.

The software could also use an image captured by a mobile phone camera to snap a quick picture of stray keys on a table top.

For a more dramatic demonstration, the researchers set up a camera with a zoom lens 60 metres away from a key. Using those photos, they created a key that was 80% accurate on their first try.

Within three attempts they opened every lock. Three attempts could take less than five minutes.

The replication process is very easy. Once the researchers have the image it takes the software roughly 30 seconds to decode the ridges and grooves on the key. If the angle is off or the lighting is tricky it takes the computer take a little longer.

The longest part of the process, about one whole minute, is cutting the key.

"I think that this work would be really easy for someone else to reproduce," says Savage. "Someone familiar with signal processing, mat lab, and image transformation could do it in two days if they are good."
No secrets

Keys, as the researchers demonstrated, are actually fairly easy to decode.

A majority of keys marketed to consumers are basically just four to six different numbers. Each number corresponds to a ridge or valley in the key.

When inserted into a lock, the ridges and valleys lines up a series of small pins that lets the lock turn.

"The premise is that a key holds some kind of secret that lets you unlock something," says Savage. "But it's a very funny secret; it's a secret that can easily be seen."

Creating a new key is easy enough that some locksmiths and security experts do it by sight alone.

The locks the UCSD team broke were some of the most common in the country.

Marc Weber Tobias, an attorney and security expert who has been picking locks since he was a boy, says the UCSD project does a good job of underscoring the insecurity of conventional cylinder locks.

But the idea of someone standing up to a kilometre away with a high resolution camera and stealing keys with a shutter is small compared to the next generation of video cameras being installed.

"The real issue is the new digital video cameras shooting at 30 frames a second," says Tobias. "There are millions and millions of these cameras everywhere."

If someone got their hands on sensitive parts of the video they could easily duplicate key sets.

Locksmiths, and the UCSD scientists won't use their talents or technology for ill-gotten gains. But not everyone is so ethical, and experts urge people to take physical security more seriously.

"This isn't the biggest security threat that you might face," says Savage. "But you should only take your keys out when you are going to use them."
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:44 AM   #993
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.dailytech.com/IBM+and+US+...ticle13502.htm

IBM and US Government Seek to Build Computer Brain as Smart as a Cat
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:49 AM   #994
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Nanotech clothing fabric 'never gets wet'

* 18:02 24 November 2008 by Jon Evans
* For similar stories, visit the Nanotechnology Topic Guide

If you were to soak even your best raincoat underwater for two months it would be wet though at the end of the experience. But a new waterproof material developed by Swiss chemists would be as dry as the day it went in.

Lead researcher Stefan Seeger at the University of Zurich says the fabric, made from polyester fibres coated with millions of tiny silicone filaments, is the most water-repellent clothing-appropriate material ever created.

Drops of water stay as spherical balls on top of the fabric (see image, right) and a sheet of the material need only be tilted by 2 degrees from horizontal for them to roll off like marbles. A jet of water bounces off the fabric without leaving a trace (see second image).
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:50 AM   #995
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Under construction: The fuel tank of the future

* 24 November 2008
* Magazine issue 2683. Subscribe and get 4 free issues.
* For similar stories, visit the Energy and Fuels Topic Guide

If the hydrogen economy is ever going to become reality, we will need a way to store the stuff without having to compress it to dangerously high pressures. The gas could then be fed to fuel cells to power the phones, laptops and automobiles of the future.

Just such a technique may now be coming together in a Dutch lab, in the shape of a material in which billions of carbon buckyballs are sandwiched between sheets of graphene - another form of carbon.

The US Department of Energy reckons that to be viable, hydrogen stores should hold at least 6 per cent by weight of the gas. Until now, materials designed to do the job have fallen well short of this target. Metal hydrides which bind loosely to hydrogen can hold only 2 per cent. So the race is on to develop a molecular matrix that can store more.

Last month, George Froudakis and his team at the University of Crete in Greece reported that computer simulations of a layer cake of graphene sheets connected by hollow carbon nanotubes (see right) indicate that it could store 6.1 per cent of its weight in hydrogen (Nano Letters, vol 8, p 3166).

Now Dimitrios Gournis of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands has started to make this exotic sandwich. So far he has created a 40-layer structure in which the sheets are separated by buckyballs, and is aiming to replace these with the nanotubes envisaged by Froudakis by the end of the year. The next step will be to fill the structures with hydrogen to see whether Froudakis's predictions hold true.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:51 AM   #996
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Cellphone clusters give traffic jams away

* 22 November 2008
* Magazine issue 2683. Subscribe and get 4 free issues.
* For similar stories, visit the Cars and Motoring Topic Guide

SHOULD you get off the motorway now, or carry on and hope the traffic clears? Your cellphone could soon have the answer.

Researchers at Nokia and the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a system that collects GPS data from mobile phones in moving vehicles and uses it to create traffic maps. The maps are available on the internet or sent to your cellphone to provide local traffic analysis.

Alex Bayen at UC Berkeley says that if enough people download the free software (from http://traffic.berkeley.edu), the system should help relieve congestion, even on small intercity roads. And in case you're worried that the neighbours will now be able to follow your every move, he says that the system anonymises GPS data so that it will be impossible to track individual cars.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 11:54 AM   #997
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Invention: Personal life mapper

* 19:00 21 November 2008 by Justin Mullins
* For similar stories, visit the Invention Topic Guide

The trouble with personal information is that it grows and evolves as time goes on.

You collect an ever-increasing variety of documents, such as images, web pages and contact details. These are stored on a wide variety of devices like smartphones, PCs, and web servers belonging to companies such as Yahoo and Google.

Not only is it more difficult to collect all your information, but it is harder to organise and represent. Search engines that produce lists in return for even an advanced search entry are not really up to the task.

Georges Grinstein and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell say they can do better by displaying the results of a search as a 2D or 3D map, with related documents and information clustered together in space.
Life in 3D

The team have developed new algorithms to do the clustering, as well as making it possible for results to be superimposed on relevant background images or 3D objects. For example, work information might be attached to a picture of your office, and receipts from a trip to Paris to a 3D Eiffel tower.

The team claim these personal information maps are easier to use because they are more akin to the way our minds store and organise information.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 12:06 PM   #998
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Material slicker than Teflon discovered by accident

* 16:28 21 November 2008 by Kurt Kleiner

A superhard substance that is more slippery than Teflon could protect mechanical parts from wear and tear, and boost energy efficiency by reducing friction.

The "ceramic alloy" is created by combining a metal alloy of boron, aluminium and magnesium (AlMgB14) with titanium boride (TiB2). It is the hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride.

BAM, as the material is called, was discovered at the US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory in Iowa in 1999, during attempts to develop a substance to generate electricity when heated.
Eternal lubricant

BAM didn't do that, but was found to have other desirable characteristics. "Its hardness was discovered by accident. We had a terrible time cutting it, grinding it, or polishing it," says Alan Russell, a materials scientist at Iowa State University in Ames.

Those chance findings have now developed into a $3-million programme at the Ames Lab to develop the BAM into a kind of eternal lubricant, a coating for moving parts to boost energy efficiency and longevity by reducing friction.

BAM is much slipperier than Teflon, with a coefficient of friction of .02 compared to .05. Lubricated steel has a friction coefficient of 0.16.

One way to exploit this slipperiness is to coat the rotor blades in everyday pumps used in everything from heating systems to aircraft, says Russel. A slick BAM coating of just 2 microns (see image, top right) could reduce friction between the blades and their housing, meaning less power is needed to produce the same pumping power.
Mystery material

Bruce Cook, lead investigator on the Ames Lab project, estimates that merely coating rotors with the material could save US industry alone 330 trillion kilojoules (9 billion kilowatt hours) every year by 2030 - about $179 million a year.

BAM is also potentially attractive as a hard coating for drill bits and other cutting tools. Diamond is commonly used for this, and is harder, but it reacts chemically with steel and so degrades relatively quickly when used to cut the metal.

By contrast, BAM is cheaper and does not degrade when used with steel.

The exact reason for the new material's characteristics is still unclear, Russell told New Scientist. Most superhard materials, such as diamond, have a simple, regular and symmetrical crystalline structure. But BAM is complex, unsymmetrical, and its lattice contains gaps, none of which would be expected in a hard material.

Its slipperiness is also not entirely understood. Although Russell says the best theory is that the boron interacts with oxygen to make tiny amounts of boron oxide on its surface. They would attract water molecules from the air, to make a slippery coating.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 12:06 PM   #999
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

Celebrity 'blindness' down to brain wiring

* 18:00 23 November 2008 by Ewen Callaway
* For similar stories, visit the The Human Brain Topic Guide

If you can't tell Angelina Jolie from Jennifer Aniston, total ignorance of pop culture might not be the only culprit. People with a rare condition called "face blindness" lack connections in a brain area responsible for recognising faces, new research shows.

Officially termed prosopagnosia, face blindness takes two forms: acquired and inherited. People who develop the condition later in life have usually suffered a stroke or an injury in a brain region important for facial recognition called the fusiform gyrus, says Cibu Thomas, a neuroscientist who led the study while at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The inherited form – which may affect up to one out of 50 people – is far more mysterious. Tests of facial recognition can diagnose inherited prosopagnosiacs, but functional brain scans have revealed few differences between their brains and those of people who can pick out celebrities and loved ones.

"Here's a brain that looks normal in an MRI, and in some cases they have difficulty in recognising their own spouse," says Thomas, who is now at the Harvard Medical School.
Wiring differences

In search of a deeper cause, Thomas and his colleagues subjected six face-blind subjects to a type of brain imaging which reveals the structural connections that allow distant parts of the brain to communicate.

Called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the technique has revealed wiring differences in the brains of people with synaesthesia, compared to people without the condition.

The brains of prosopagnosiacs housed fewer connections than controls in two tracts that run smack through the fusiform gyrus; while other parts of their brains showed no such wiring differences, the team found.

Slower or noisier neuron signals to and from the fusiform gyrus could explain some cases of face blindness, Thomas says.
Face the test

On tests of celebrity face recognition – identifying a hairless Elvis Presley, for instance – these brain connections predicted the scores of people with prosopagnosia, as well as controls. This suggests that prosopagnosia is a matter of degree, Thomas says.

Test your own face blindness here

Thomas' team doesn't know what could cause these changes, but a German team has found that face blindness runs in families and is currently searching for genes linked to the condition.

This hunt might not be so clear cut, says Brad Duchaine, a cognitive neuroscientist at University College London.

Duchaine says the new findings offer a great explanation for some cases of prosopagnosia, but at least six brain regions are involved in face processing and various injuries or biological changes could affect how they work. "There are a lot of ways that face processing can go wrong," he says.

Journal reference: Nature Neuroscience (DOI: 10.1038/nn.2224)
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 07:06 AM   #1000
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,056

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/1..._n_145887.html

Scientology Building Security Guard Shot And Killed Man Wielding Two Samurai Swords
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:13 PM.


Denver Broncos