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Old 11-20-2008, 05:54 AM   #926
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http://www.sciam.com/blog/60-second-...t-t-2008-11-18

Is global warming forcing Bigfoot to move north?
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:03 AM   #927
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http://blog.mint.com/blog/finance-co...ancial-crisis/
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:13 AM   #928
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Ants' Metropolis

You have to see it to believe it - what scientist uncovered when they filled ant's tunnels with cement... The structure that simply boggles the mind.
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:22 AM   #929
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:23 AM   #930
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:24 AM   #931
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:50 AM   #932
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http://www.surrealien.de/

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Old 11-20-2008, 06:55 AM   #933
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:57 AM   #934
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Old 11-20-2008, 06:58 AM   #935
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:00 AM   #936
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:00 AM   #937
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:03 AM   #938
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:26 AM   #939
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http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...SlU&refer=muse

New Evidence Uncovered to Identify Tomb of Bible's King Herod

By Calev Ben-David

Nov. 19 (Bloomberg) -- Excavations at a site near Jerusalem support the view that it is the mausoleum of King Herod the Great, according to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The tomb was originally about 25 meters high, a size that excavation director Ehud Netzer said would have been appropriate to a figure of Herod's political stature, the university's Institute of Archeology said in a news release today.

Digging work has continued this year at the structure first uncovered in May 2007 at Herodium, a hilltop fortress built by Herod 15 kilometers south of Jerusalem and east of Bethlehem.

Netzer said the tomb was vandalized by Jewish forces during the Judean revolt against Rome, according to the release.

Herod was the Roman-appointed ruler of Judea, today modern Israel and the West Bank. He is famed for building the desert fortress of Masada and rebuilding Jerusalem's Second Temple, and for his depiction in the New Testament as a tyrant at the time of Jesus's birth.

To contact the writer on the story: Calev Ben-David in Jerusalem at cbendavid@bloomberg.net.
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:27 AM   #940
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http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...rIkmQD94HMUC81

US museum head says Mexico should get Mayan jade

By MARK STEVENSON – 1 day ago

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The director of Harvard's Peabody Museum said Tuesday he wants to return about 50 ancient carved Mayan jade pieces to Mexico, almost a century after a U.S. consul dredged the artifacts from the sacred lake at the ruins of Chichen Itza.

The artifacts were among hundreds of pieces taken to the United States by American consul Edward Herbert Thompson, who dredged up the bottom of the sacred lake between 1904 and 1910 to recover offerings deposited there by the Mayas.

William Fash, director of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, said the idea would still have to be approved by authorities at the university and the museum, but that returning the artifacts could help scholars studying jade and jade-like stones which held both artistic and religious significance for the Mayas.

"It is important, I think, for many of the jades to be studied here in Mexico by people who are now doing careful studies of jades," many of which were brought long distances to Chichen Itza in Mexico's southern Yucatan peninsula by ancient pilgrims, Fash told The Associated Press.

Such pieces could say a lot about trade, commerce and artistic patterns in the pre-Hispanic world.

The return of the artifacts — many of which were pieced together from fragments by famed researcher Tatiana Proskouriakoff before her death in 1985 — could also be displayed at a museum near the site where they were originally found.

"This would be something I think they would be very pleased to exhibit," said Fash.

He said it was part of a growing trend where museums are making arrangements to return pieces to their countries of origin in exchange for short term loans of other artifacts, noting that "in this way both institutions win."
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:27 AM   #941
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http://entertainment.timesonline.co....cle5193031.ece

‘Looted’ art treasures head home
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:28 AM   #942
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http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2...arkmatter.html

Physicists Find Dark Matter, or Something Even More Strange

A new experiment may have found the first direct evidence of dark matter particles, a discovery that could begin to unravel one of the biggest mysteries in physics.

Theorists believe that dark matter, made up of of weakly-interacting massive particles, composes 23 percent of the universe, but no one has ever directly detected one of these WIMPs.

080998_universe_contentm_2 Now, physicists have announced they've spotted electrons with just about the amount of energy they would have expected to be made by a particular kind of WIMP entering the visible world.

John Wefel of Louisiana State University and colleagues report in Nature Wednesday that they could have detected "Kaluza-Klein" electron-positron pairs resulting from the annihilation of these WIMPS.

The KK particles are predicted by multiple-dimension theories of the universe and have long-been a leading candidate as the substance of dark matter. The new discovery then, if confirmed, would provide evidence that the fabric of space-time has many "compact" dimensions beyond the four that humans perceive.

"If the Kaluza–Klein annihilation explanation proves to be correct, this will necessitate a fuller investigation of such multidimensional spaces, with potentially important implications for our understanding of the Universe," the authors conclude.

A3launchDozens of teams are working to understand the invisible dark matter and dark energy that when combined astrophysicists believe make up 95 percent of the universe. Most of the evidence for the dark stuff's existence comes through indirect observations: as physicist Myungkook James Jee put it last year, "We can't see a wind, but we can see it blow." So, the first direct detection of dark matter would be a landmark discovery.

Wefel's team sent a balloon carrying the "ATIC" particle detector aloft over Antarctica, where it measured the telltale charges and energies of electrons.

But the new detection isn't a sure indication of the existence of KK particles. Harvard astrophysicist Yousaf Butt argued that other astronomical objects could explain the creation of these high-energy electrons, in an editorial that accompanied the original paper. The leftovers from supernovas, spinning pulsars, or microquasars could all be responsible for the observations, or things could get even stranger.

"And let’s not forget that a completely new type of astrophysical object could also produce the detected electron excess; after all, pulsars were discovered only in 1967, and until 1992 we were blissfully unaware of microquasars," he wrote.

Further experiments seem likely to reveal the true source of this cosmic electron anomaly. With longer observation times or better detectors, scientists should be able to puzzle out whether the spectral signature of the detected electrons fits the dark matter thesis.
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:30 AM   #943
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http://www.lankabusinessonline.com/f...nid=1544770535

Bitter Labour
18 Nov, 2008 08:42:46
Slave labor reality of Sugar-cane ethanol
SAO PAULO, November 17, 2008 (AFP) - The cost of slave labor in sugar cane fields should not be overlooked when promoting the virtues of ethanol, the Roman Catholic Church said Monday, as an international conference on biofuel got under way in Brazil.
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:31 AM   #944
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-detector.html

man and his metal detector

By James Tozer
Last updated at 6:48 PM on 19th November 2008

* Comments (0)
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For 40 years, Maurice Richardson has been braving all weathers to scour the countryside with his trusty metal detector, dreaming of buried treasure.

But he almost ignored an unpromising-sounding beep as he searched for debris from a wartime air crash while being pelted with rain.

However the 59-year-old is glad his curiosity got the better of him after his persistence in digging through more than two feet of Nottinghamshire mud yielded a stunning 2,000-year-old gold treasure.
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:34 AM   #945
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http://www.geekologie.com/2008/11/ko..._new_haloy.php

Korean Soldiers Get New Halo-y Armor



The Rupublic of Korea's troops are stepping into winter fashion in a big way -- with all new threads and a sweet-ass rifle.

The new new battle uniforms would provide protection against nuclear, biological, and chemical attacks, and would feature automatic temperature control. A new protective vest is also planned. In addition to keeping the lead out, the helmet will be prewired for minicam video transmission, GPS navigation, and assorted networking gear

And the gun?

The double-barreled K-11 assault rifle lets the shooter fire either NATO 5.56- or 20-millimeter grenades, all off the same trigger. Day and night aiming is accomplished with a thermal target seeker and laser that calculates distance automatically--a true point-and-shoot.

Oh man, WANT! I just question how legitimate this new gear is seeing how the picture looks suspiciously like someone Xeroxed the cover of an old sci-fi novel.

Hit the jump for a 5:00 video about the new rifle. Pretty sweet drop-test footage starting at 4:15.

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Old 11-20-2008, 07:35 AM   #946
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...ming-true.html

Prophesy of economic collapse 'coming true'

* 16:05 17 November 2008 by Jeff Hecht

Things may seem bad now - with fears of a world recession looming - but they could be set to get much worse.

A real-world analysis of a controversial prediction made 30 years ago concludes that economic growth cannot be sustained and we are on track for serious economic collapse this century.

In 1972, the seminal book Limits to Growth by a group called the Club of Rome claimed that exponential growth would eventually lead to economic and environmental collapse.

The group used computer models that assessed the interaction of rising populations, pollution, industrial production, resource consumption and food production.

Most economists rubbished the book and its recommendations have been ignored by governments, although a growing band of experts today continues to argue that we need to reshape our economy to become more sustainable.

Now Graham Turner at theCommonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Australia has compared the book's predictions with data from the intervening years.
'Steady state economy'

Changes in industrial production, food production and pollution are all in line with the book's predictions of collapse in the 21st century, says Turner. According to the book, the path we have taken will cause decreasing resource availability and an escalating cost of extraction that triggers a slowdown of industry, which eventually results in economic collapse some time after 2020.

"For the first 30 years of the model, the world has been tracking along an unsustainable trajectory," he says.

According to Herman Daly of the University of Maryland, Turner's results show that we "must get off the growth path of business as usual, and move to a steady state economy," stopping population growth, resource depletion, and pollution.

Yet Turner reckons his report [pdf format] shows that a sustainable economy is attainable. "We wouldn't have to go back to the caves," he says.

Journal reference: Global Environmental Change (vol 18, p397)
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Old 11-20-2008, 09:23 AM   #947
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http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2...computers.html

Supercomputers Break Petaflop Barrier, Transforming Science

A new crop of supercomputers is breaking down the petaflop speed barrier, pushing high-performance computing into a new realm that could change science more profoundly than at any time since Galileo, leading researchers say.

When the Top 500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was announced at the international supercomputing conference in Austin, Texas, on Monday, IBM had barely managed to cling to the top spot, fending off a challenge from Cray. But both competitors broke petaflop speeds, performing 1.105 and 1.059 quadrillion floating-point calculations per second, the first two computers to do so.

These computers aren't just faster than those they pushed further down the list, they will enable a new class of science that wasn't possible before. As recently described in Wired magazine, these massive number crunchers will push simulation to the forefront of science.

Scientists will be able to run new and vastly more accurate models of complex phenomena: Climate models will have dramatically higher resolution and accuracy, new materials for efficient energy transmission will be developed and simulations of scramjet engines will reach a new level of complexity.

"The scientific method has changed for the first time since Galileo invented the telescope (in 1609)," said computer scientist Mark Seager of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Supercomputing has made huge advances over the last decade or so, gradually packing on the ability to handle more and more data points in increasingly complex ways. It has enabled scientists to test theories, design experiments and predict outcomes as never before. But now, the new class of petaflop-scale machines is poised to bring about major qualitative changes in the way science is done.

"The new capability allows you to do fundamentally new physics and tackle new problems," said Thomas Zacharia, who heads up computer science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, home of the second place Cray XT5 Jaguar supercomputer. "And it will accelerate the transition from basic research to applied technology."

Breaking the petaflop barrier, a feat that seemed astronomical just two years ago, won't just allow faster computations. These computers will enable entirely new types of science that couldn't have been done before. This new generation of petascale machines will move scientific simulation beyond just supporting the two main branches of science, theory and experimentation, and into the foreground. Instead of just hypotheses being tested with experiments and observations, large-scale extrapolation and prediction of things we can't observe or that would be impractical for an experiment, will become central to many scientific endeavors.

"It's getting to the point where simulation is actually the third branch of science," Seager said. "We say that nature is always the arbiter of truth, but it turns out our ability to observe nature is fundamentally limited."
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Old 11-20-2008, 11:34 AM   #948
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Old 11-20-2008, 11:51 AM   #949
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Old 11-20-2008, 12:49 PM   #950
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In this clip, a YouTuber has synced the "Dawn of Man" clip to one of my favorite Pink Floyd songs, "One of These Days."
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