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Old 10-21-2008, 07:20 AM   #626
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http://www.prisonplanet.com/huge-pro...mandatory.html

Huge Protests As New Jersey Declares Flu Vaccines Mandatory
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:21 AM   #627
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...-research.html


Human tissue could be taken from the infirm without their consent and used for research
Human tissue could be taken from the mentally infirm without their consent and used to create embryos for experimentation, under Government proposals added to a controversial bill.
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:22 AM   #628
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...c-integration/

Canada, EU working towards ‘historic’ economic integration
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Old 10-21-2008, 03:42 PM   #629
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Compromising Electromagnetic Emanations of Keyboards Experiment 1/2 from Martin Vuagnoux on Vimeo.


Paul Miller, endgadget: We always knew those electromagnetic emanations would amount to no good, and now here they go ruining any shred of privacy we once thought to possess. Some folks from the Security and Cryptography Lab at Switzerland's EPFL have managed to eavesdrop on the electromagnetic radiation shot off by shoddy wired keyboards with every keystroke. They've found four different ways to listen in, including one previously-published general vulnerability, on eleven keyboard models ranging from 2001 to 2008, with PS/2, USB and laptop keyboards all falling to at least one of the four attacks.

The attack works through walls, as far as 65 feet away, and analyzes a wide swath of electromagnetic spectrum to get its results. With wireless keyboards already feeling the sting of hackers, it's probably fair to say that no one is safe, and that cave bunkers far, far away from civilization are pretty much our only hope now
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Old 10-21-2008, 04:18 PM   #630
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http://www.forbes.com/opinions/forbe...027/021_2.html

Boston Tea Party II

The Massachusetts political establishment is horrified--voters might actually pass a proposition abolishing the state income tax. The personal income tax rate is 5.3%, and the state capital gains levy peaks at 12%. Under the proposition the tax would be cut 50% on Jan. 1, 2009 and eradicated on Jan. 1, 2010. These exactions currently raise about 40% of the state's budget revenue--27% if you count all of the Bay State's off-budget spending.

A similar measure was on the ballot six years ago. With almost no promotion it garnered a 45% yes vote, stunning politicians. The measure got a majority in a third of Massachusetts towns. An earlier proposition--a mild one--had appeared on the ballot in 2000. It cut the income tax to 5% from 5.75%. It passed. But state legislators thumbed their noses at the voters, lowering the rate only to 5.3%--a graphic example of the growing disconnect between citizens and the political culture.

Naturally, opponents predict the direst of circumstances if the measure passes, even though the state legislature will probably treat the referendum the same way it did the previous tax cut initiative.

The reason the measure stands even a chance of passing is not that Bay State citizens are selfish (even though each would enjoy on average an additional $3,700 of income) but that they are angry. This is an attack on political establishments there and throughout the U.S. that routinely put their own interests above those of their constituents: lavish government pensions with payouts that would bankrupt private companies; resistance to genuine reform in Medicaid spending, which has become the biggest item on virtually every state's budget; ever more pork-barrel spending; and ever more obsequiousness to rapacious special interests.

It's telling when one of the most liberal states in the Union, with two extremely liberal U.S. senators and a House delegation with nary a Republican, is on the verge of a tax rebellion.

Bay State voters--go for your proposition. Your pols didn't enact your polite initiative of a small income tax reduction. Maybe they'll wake up when you whack them with a 2-by-4.
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Old 10-23-2008, 07:57 AM   #632
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I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.
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Old 10-23-2008, 08:01 AM   #633
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.
So put some new stuff up already!
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Old 10-23-2008, 08:16 AM   #634
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I got 14 tickets in the last two days...i've been a bit busy...
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Old 10-23-2008, 09:40 AM   #635
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Tickets? Double park or something?

http://www.physorg.com/news143823997.html

Quote:

Physicists find a new state of matter in a 'transistor'

McGill University researchers have discovered a new state of matter, a quasi-three- dimensional electron crystal, in a material very much like those used in the fabrication of modern transistors. This discovery could have momentous implications for the development of new electronic devices. Currently, the number of transistors that can be inexpensively crammed onto a single computer chip increases exponentially, doubling approximately every two years, a trend known as Moore's Law. But there are limits, experts say. As chips get smaller and smaller, scientists expect that the bizarre laws and behaviours of quantum physics will take over, making ever-smaller chips impossible.
More in the article page.
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Old 10-23-2008, 09:41 AM   #636
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I got 14 tickets in the last two days...i've been a bit busy...
Tickets for what?
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Old 10-23-2008, 09:56 AM   #637
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Tickets? Double park or something?

http://www.physorg.com/news143823997.html



More in the article page.
hmmmm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor

Memristors /memˈrɪstɚ/ ("memory resistors") are a class of passive two-terminal circuit elements that maintain a functional relationship between the time integrals of current and voltage. This results in resistance varying according to the device's memristance function. Specifically engineered memristors provide controllable resistance useful for switching current. The memristor is a special case in so-called "memristive systems", a class of mathematical models useful for certain empirically observed phenomena, such as the firing of neurons.[3] The definition of the memristor is based solely on fundamental circuit variables, similar to the resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Unlike those more familiar elements, the necessarily nonlinear memristors may be described by any of a variety of time-varying functions. As a result, memristors do not belong to linear time-invariant (LTI) circuit models. A linear time-invariant memristor is simply a conventional resistor.[4]

Memristor theory was formulated and named by Leon Chua in a 1971 paper. Chua strongly believed that a fourth device existed to provide conceptual symmetry with the resistor, inductor, and capacitor. This symmetry follows from the description of basic passive circuit elements as defined by a relation between two of the four fundamental circuit variables, namely voltage, current, charge and flux.[5] A device linking charge and flux (themselves defined as time integrals of current and voltage), which would be the memristor, was still hypothetical at the time. He did acknowledge that other scientists had already used fixed nonlinear flux-charge relationships.[6] However, it would not be until thirty-seven years later, on April 30, 2008, that a team at HP Labs led by the scientist R. Stanley Williams would announce the discovery of a switching memristor. Based on a thin film of titanium dioxide, it has been presented as an approximately ideal device.[7][8][9] Being much simpler than currently popular MOSFET switches and also able to implement one bit of non-volatile memory in a single device, memristors may enable nanoscale computer technology.[10] Chua also speculates that they may be useful in the construction of artificial neural networks.[11]
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:12 AM   #638
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Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.
Keep it coming, I need my daily fix
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:18 AM   #639
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http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008...ad-album-sales

Sean Michaels, The Guardian: Despite being downloaded free of charge to hard drives and iPods all over the world, In Rainbows has sold more CD copies than their previous two albums. And we're not counting free or cheap downloads as equal to a full-value CD purchase. No, even after In Rainbows was sitting on hard drives and iPods across the land, it still sold more CD copies than their previous two recent releases.

Warner Chappell, Radiohead's publishers, made the announcement in a keynote presentation at the You Are In Control conference in Iceland, as reported by Music Ally magazine. In some of the first official figures to be released, Warner Chappell said that the CD version of In Rainbows has racked up 1.75m sales to date. Contrast this with sales figures from 2001's Amnesiac and 2003's Hail to the Thief, which as of late last year had sold 900,000 and 990,000 copies respectively, according to Hits Daily Double.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:20 AM   #640
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http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2868

Elephant sends sms messages to rangers

In the Kenyan wildlife conservancy Ol Pejeta elephants are tagged with a GPS-triggered text messaging device. Before the elephants start raiding the nearby villagers’ harvest they send a text message to the rangers. The rangers respond by chasing the elephants off again. The tag also enables online elephant tracking through Google Earth for preservation concerns. How long will it take until the wildlife online identity will walk around in second life for safari tours? And people get killed on the internet by grumpy elephant bulls?

Not only elephants are tagged with GPS coordinates, also other wild animals can be tracked easily. So the safari experience comes with ‘wildlife guarantee’ these days. It seems that even Africa looses its adventurous nature. When will we drive with our landrovers through the stock-market hunting for broke speculators?
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:20 AM   #641
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http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2842

The RepRap is a selfreproducing 3D printer. The 3D printer ‘prints’ his own components by melting tiny plastic particles together.

Imagine what would happen if this 3D printer wouldn’t stop reproducing. At a certain point, the 3D printers will reproduce faster than we could destroy them. The RepRap will populate the world, the human race will die out and eventually the RepRap will evolve into smarter and better devices.

Happily the RepRap is still dependent on the human race
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:21 AM   #642
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...cidream117.xml


Black and white TV generation have monochrome dreamsScience



Do you dream in black and white? If so, the chances are you are over 55 and were brought up watching a monochrome television set. New research suggests that the type of television you watched as a child has a profound effect on the colour of your dreams. While almost all under 25s dream in colour, thousands of over 55s, all of whom were brought up with black and white sets, often dream in monchrome - even now.

The findings suggest that the moment when Dorothy passes out of monochrome Kansas and awakes in Technicolor Oz may have had more significance for our subconscious than we literally ever dreamed of. Eva Murzyn, a psychology student at Dundee University who carried out the study, said: "It is a fascinating hypothesis.

"It suggests there could be a critical period in our childhood when watching films has a big impact on the way dreams are formed. "What is even more interesting is that before the advent of black and white television all the evidence suggests we were dreaming in colour."

Research from 1915 through to the 1950s suggested that the vast majority of dreams are in black and white but the tide turned in the sixties, and later results suggested that up to 83 per cent of dreams contain some colour.

Since this period also marked the transition between black-and-white film and TV and widespread Technicolor, an obvious explanation was that the media had been priming the subjects' dreams.

However it was always controversial and differences between the studies prevented the researchers from drawing any firm conclusions.

But now Miss Murzyn believes she has proved the link. She re-looked at the old studies and combined them with a survey of her own of more 60 people, half of which were over 55 and half of which were under 25.

She asked the volunteers to answer a questionnaire on the colour of their dreams and their childhood exposure to film and TV.

The subjects then recorded different aspects of their dreams in a diary every morning.

Miss Murzyn found there was no significant difference between results drawn from the questionnaires and the dream diaries - thus proving that the previous studies were comparable.

She then analysed her own data to find out whether an early exposure to black-and-white TV could still have a lasting effect on her subjects' dreams, 40 years later.

Only 4.4 per cent of the under-25s' dreams were black and white. The over-55s who had had access to colour TV and film during their childhood also reported a very low proportion of just 7.3 per cent.

But the over-55s who had only had access to black-and-white media reported dreaming in black and white roughly a quarter of the time.

Even though they would have spent only a few hours a day watching TV or films, their attention and emotional engagement would have been heightened during this time, leaving a deeper imprint on their mind, Miss Murzyn told the New Scientist.

"The crucial time is between three and 10 when we all begin to have the ability to dream," she said.

"Television and films which by their very nature are interesting and emotionally engaging and even dreamlike. So when you dream you may copy what you have seen on the screen.

"I have even had a computer game player who dreams as if he is in front of a computer screen."

Miss Murzyn concedes it's still impossible to verify whether the dreams are actually in black-and-white, or whether media exposure somehow alters the way the mind reconstructs the dreams once we wake.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:24 AM   #643
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http://www.thecoolhunter.net/art/Tar...ups-To-Genius/



New York artist Tara Donovan is a master of seeing. Not just looking, but actually seeing. Her sculptural, one-of-a-kind art is based on her ability to see, imagine and create forms, shapes and textures from ordinary objects that most of us don’t even notice. She creates art from rolls of tape, pieces of pencil, Styrofoam cups, paper plates, napkins. Her sculptural works evoke thoughts of nature. A perfect example is the “Untitled” cloud formation she created in 2003 from Styrofoam cups and glue.

The 38-year-old Donovan has recently accomplished several things many artists never achieve. This September, the first monograph of her work was published by visual book press, Monacelli Press (now owned by Random House). A couple of weeks later, on October 10, a traveling retrospective of her work opened at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

But perhaps the biggest deal is the extra half-a-million dollars that she will have to work with in the next few years. In late September, she received a phone call from the John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation. She was informed that she had been made a Fellow of the Foundation and that she will receive a $500,000 MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant. It is a no-strings-attached support of her work over five years. She was selected as one of 25 recipients in 2008. Others include a physician, an astrophysicist, a violinist, a computer scientist and representatives of many other endeavours who were selected for their creativity, originality and potential to make important contributions in the future. - Tuija Seipell
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:31 AM   #644
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http://technology.newscientist.com/c...ine-news_rss20

Newly-discovered fungus strips pollutants from oil

A humble fungus could help oil companies clean up their fuel to meet tightening emissions standards. The fungus, recently discovered in Iran, grows naturally in crude oil and removes the sulphur and nitrogen compounds that lead to acid rain and air pollution.

Worldwide, government are imposing increasingly severe limits on how much of those compounds fuels can contain. Oil producers are searching for more efficient ways to strip sulphur and nitrogen from their products.

The standard way to "desulphurise" crude oil involves reacting it with hydrogen at temperatures of 455 °C and up to 204 times atmospheric pressure (roughly 21 million pascals or 3000 psi). It achieves less than perfect results.

Micro-organisms able to metabolise sulphur and nitrogen have the potential to achieve the same endpoint under more normal conditions. In recent years a number of researchers have isolated desulphurising bacteria.

But Jalal Shayegan and his team at the Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, Iran, have now discovered and isolated a fungus that appears able to remove sulphur from oil with greater efficiency.
Fungus hunting

Shayegan's team went looking for fungus in oil-contaminated soil from Tehran oil refinery and the Kuhemond oil field in Iran, and isolated a number of new desulphurising micro-organisms.

Tests revealed that one strain of Stachybotrys fungus was particularly efficient at sulphur removal – the first fungus found to have this ability.

Shayegan's team pitted their new find against several known desulphurising bacteria. They grew them all for 6 days on heavy crude oil samples from the Kuhemond and Soroush oil fields, mixed with a water-based growth medium.
Clear winner

The fungus achieved the best results by far. In one sample it removed 76% of sulphur compounds in just 3 days, a figure only one bacteria could match over the full 6 days.

Robin van Leerdam at Wageningen University in Bomenweg, Netherlands, says biodesulphurisation holds promise as a method to refine oil and that the new contender is a welcome addition.

But he says rematches are required to properly test it against the known bacteria. "The sulphur removal efficiency of the fungus is higher than of the bacterium, but the comparison is not completely fair," he told New Scientist.

The desulphurising bacteria pitted against the fungus were previously grown on Dibenzothiophene, commonly used to simulate the sulphur compounds in crude oil. But they had not been grown before on crude oil itself. Leerdam thinks bacteria more used to crude oil would run the fungus closer for efficiency.
A better bet?

Other researchers are still advancing non-biological approaches to stripping sulphur from oil.

"If you want to invest in desulphurisation technologies then put your money on the chemical route," Michiel Makkee at Delft University of Technology in Julianalaan, Netherlands told New Scientist.

His team recently designed a simple ester capable of removing sulphur from diesel. It works 10 or 20 times faster than a fungus or bacteria, and could be squeezed into much more compact reactors than a biological process, Makkee says.

But he concedes that his new method still requires heat – working at 140 °C compared to the fungus' room temperature.

Journal references: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (DOI: 10.1021/ie800494p); ChemSusChem (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800109)

Energy and Fuels - Learn more about the looming energy crisis in our comprehensive special report.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:32 AM   #645
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http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/1...stem-cell.html

Testicle-Harvested Stem Cells Prove Versatile
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:35 AM   #646
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After seeing the styrofoam cup art I figured you might like this one.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthre...0&page=1&pp=15

It's an industry website. A lot of digital artists post there. One guy is doing experimental shaders based entirely upon math. It's pretty crazy and I don't even have half a clue what he's doing but this is an example of the results. It's taking him around 20 hours to render each of those as a still frame. It's really impressive. He said he might post a tutorial sometime in the future then maybe I can try to understand exactly what he's doing.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:36 AM   #647
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http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/1...stem-cell.html

Testicle-Harvested Stem Cells Prove Versatile
Ahhh... the many wonders of my balls.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:37 AM   #648
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http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2867

This gun style camera projects messages on the objects of which people take pictures. It can not be seen by the naked eye, but is only visible on the pictures strangers take of the objects on the streets. The device is a camera triggered by the flash of other camera’s. As soon as a flash is registered the fulgurator beams a projection on the object. Created the German artist Julius von Bismarck. It is The effect can be seen in the video.

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Old 10-23-2008, 10:38 AM   #649
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After seeing the styrofoam cup art I figured you might like this one.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthre...0&page=1&pp=15

It's an industry website. A lot of digital artists post there. One guy is doing experimental shaders based entirely upon math. It's pretty crazy and I don't even have half a clue what he's doing but this is an example of the results. It's taking him around 20 hours to render each of those as a still frame. It's really impressive. He said he might post a tutorial sometime in the future then maybe I can try to understand exactly what he's doing.
Thanks for the link man...i'll check it out then...some of the stuff i glanced through is pretty cool.

I like fractals, and those are all math based...it's pretty interesting.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:42 AM   #650
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http://www.kitchin.org/atlas/index.html

he Atlas of Cyberspace, by Martin Dodge and Rob Kitchin, is the first comprehensive book to explore the spatial and visual nature of cyberspace and its infrastructure.

It uses a user-friendly, approachable style to examine why cyberspace is being mapped and what new cartographic and visualisation techniques have been employed.

Richly illustrated with over 300 full colour images, it comprehensively catalogues 30 years worth of maps that reveal the rich and varied landscapes of cyberspace.

The book includes chapters detailing:
- mapping Internet infrastructure and traffic flows
- mapping the Web
- mapping online conversation and community
- imagining cyberspace in art, literature, and film

Update: October 2008 - The full content of the book now available for free download as a pdf.
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