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Old 10-17-2008, 02:07 PM   #601
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http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-10062193-54.html

Urban wind power inspired by ancient Persia

Windation Energy Systems, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based start-up, has developed a wind appliance that looks more or less like the modern heating and cooling equipment you see on flat corporate building rooftops.



Windation's appliance looks more like an HVAC machine than a turbine.
(Credit: Windation)

There's a 8-by-8-foot frame around a 10-foot-high cylinder. Wind blows in the top and is directed to the bottom where the wind turns a turbine to make up to 5 kilowatts of electricity. A single unit wouldn't generate enough power for an entire office building but could offset a significant portion, the company says.

Windation CEO and founder, Mark Sheikhrezai, who is originally from Iran, said he was inspired by ancient Persian buildings that use air currents and reservoirs of water to cool buildings. Using differences in air pressure, these wind catcher buildings create a steady flow of air without any mechanical devices.

http://www.cais-soas.com/CAIS/Architecture/wind.htm

IRANIAN ARCHITECTURE

"Wind Catchers"

The Cooling Systems in Traditional Iranian Architecture



Abstract: The buildings in the Iranian desert regions are constructed according to the specific climatic conditions and differ with those built in other climates. The desert buildings are equipped with air traps, arched roofed, water reservoirs with arched domes and ice stores for the preservation of ice. The operation of modern coolers is similar to the old Iranian air traps which were built at the entrance of the house over underground water reservoirs or ponds built inside the house.

Lofty walls, narrow and dry streets, highly elevated air traps, big water reservoirs and arched roofed chambers, are the outstanding features of desert towns in Iran. The ever shining scorching sun of the desert has rendered life very difficult for its hardy and warm-blooded inhabitants and has compelled them to resort to facilities that can moderate the unbearable heat. In the following article subjects relating to the building materials of desert towns and the method of operation of the traditional cooling systems in the cities with warm and arid climates are described.
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Old 10-17-2008, 02:12 PM   #602
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http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/sto...53-661,00.html

POWERFUL signals from a secretive naval base are being probed as a possible cause of a Qantas jet plunge last week.

Air safety investigators say they will look into claims signals from the base used to communication with US and Australian ships and submarines may have interfered with the Qantas Airbus's computer.

During the emergency the plane plunged 650 feet in seconds, injuring more than 70 passengers and crew.

The naval communications base is at Exmouth in Western Australia’s north, 30km from where the Qantas Airbus A330-300 made an emergency landing at Learmonth last week.

There were 303 passengers and 10 crew aboard when the plane suddenly dropped altitude, hurling people around the cabin and forcing the pilot to land.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau today said it would examine whether powerful electromagnetic signals from the communications base could have sparked the emergency.

The base uses powerful low frequency radio transmissions to US Navy and Australian Navy ships and submarines.

It is understood to be the most powerful transmission station this side of the globe and includes 13 radio towers, the tallest of which is 387m tall.

The base is named the Harold E. Holt communications station after the former Australian Prime Minister.

ATSB spokesman David Hope confirmed the new line of inquiry today, after "several" groups had raised it as a possibility.

"We're looking at everything as part of a very thorough investigation," Mr Hope said.

"That's been raised by a number of people to say that somehow or another this US military base has got a very high frequency signal tower there and that could somehow interfere with electrical devices - so we'll look at it."

The latest possibilty comes as the world's Airbus operators were warned urgently of the autopilot failure.

The ATSB has already found that the Airbus A330-300's air data computer - or inertial reference system - sent erroneous and spike information to the flight control computer causing the autopilot to disconnect.

The aircraft was cruising at 37,000 feet when the fault occurred, causing it to descend up to 650 feet in seconds.


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Old 10-17-2008, 02:20 PM   #603
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Australia: No Opt-Out of Filtered Internet
October 17th, 2008

Would you like filtered, or filtered?

Via: Computerworld:

Australians will be unable to opt-out of the government’s pending Internet content filtering scheme, and will instead be placed on a watered-down blacklist, experts say.

Under the government’s $125.8 million Plan for Cyber-Safety, users can switch between two blacklists which block content inappropriate for children, and a separate list which blocks illegal material.

Pundits say consumers have been lulled into believing the opt-out proviso would remove content filtering altogether.


http://cryptogon.com/?p=4533
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Old 10-18-2008, 05:44 PM   #604
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http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008...of-buckypaper/


Future planes, cars may be made of `buckypaper’

The Associated Press

Fri, Oct 17, 2008 (9:18 a.m.)

It's called "buckypaper" and looks a lot like ordinary carbon paper, but don't be fooled by the cute name or flimsy appearance. It could revolutionize the way everything from airplanes to TVs are made.

Buckypaper is 10 times lighter but potentially 500 times stronger than steel when sheets of it are stacked and pressed together to form a composite. Unlike conventional composite materials, though, it conducts electricity like copper or silicon and disperses heat like steel or brass.

"All those things are what a lot of people in nanotechnology have been working toward as sort of Holy Grails," said Wade Adams, a scientist at Rice University.

That idea _ that there is great future promise for buckypaper and other derivatives of the ultra-tiny cylinders known as carbon nanotubes _ has been floated for years now. However, researchers at Florida State University say they have made important progress that may soon turn hype into reality.

Buckypaper is made from tube-shaped carbon molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair. Due to its unique properties, it is envisioned as a wondrous new material for light, energy-efficient aircraft and automobiles, more powerful computers, improved TV screens and many other products.

So far, buckypaper can be made at only a fraction of its potential strength, in small quantities and at a high price. The Florida State researchers are developing manufacturing techniques that soon may make it competitive with the best composite materials now available.

"If this thing goes into production, this very well could be a very, very game-changing or revolutionary technology to the aerospace business," said Les Kramer, chief technologist for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, which is helping fund the Florida State research.

The scientific discovery that led to buckypaper virtually came from outer space.

In 1985, British scientist Harry Kroto joined researchers at Rice for an experiment to create the same conditions that exist in a star. They wanted to find out how stars, the source of all carbon in the universe, make the element that is a main building block of life.

Everything went as planned with one exception.

"There was an extra character that turned up totally unexpected," recalled Kroto, now at Florida State heading a program that encourages the study of math, science and technology in public schools. "It was a discovery out of left field."

The surprise guest was a molecule with 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. To Kroto, it also looked like the geodesic domes promoted by Buckminster Fuller, an architect, inventor and futurist. That inspired Kroto to name the new molecule buckminsterfullerene, or "buckyballs" for short.

For their discovery of the buckyball _ the third form of pure carbon to be discovered after graphite and diamonds _ Kroto and his Rice colleagues, Robert Curl Jr. and Richard E. Smalley, were awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1996.

Separately, Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima developed a tube-shaped variation while doing research at Arizona State University.

Researchers at Smalley's laboratory then inadvertently found that the tubes would stick together when disbursed in a liquid suspension and filtered through a fine mesh, producing a thin film _ buckypaper.

The secret of its strength is the huge surface area of each nanotube, said Ben Wang, director of Florida State's High-Performance Materials Institute.

"If you take a gram of nanotubes, just one gram, and if you unfold every tube into a graphite sheet, you can cover about two-thirds of a football field," Wang said.

Carbon nanotubes are already beginning to be used to strengthen tennis rackets and bicycles, but in small amounts. The epoxy resins used in those applications are 1 to 5 percent carbon nanotubes, which are added in the form of a fine powder. Buckypaper, which is a thin film rather than a powder, has a much higher nanotube content _ about 50 percent.

One challenge is that the tubes clump together at odd angles, limiting their strength in buckypaper. Wang and his fellow researchers found a solution: Exposing the tubes to high magnetism causes most of them to line up in the same direction, increasing their collective strength.

Another problem is the tubes are so perfectly smooth it's hard to hold them together with epoxy. Researchers are looking for ways to create some surface defects _ but not too many _ to improve bonding.

So far, the Florida State institute has been able to produce buckypaper with half the strength of the best existing composite material, known as IM7. Wang expects to close the gap quickly.

"By the end of next year we should have a buckypaper composite as strong as IM7, and it's 35 percent lighter," Wang said.

Buckypaper now is being made only in the laboratory, but Florida State is in the early stages of spinning out a company to make commercial buckypaper.

"These guys have actually demonstrated materials that are capable of being used on flying systems," said Adams, director of Rice's Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. "Having something that you can hold in your hand is an accomplishment in nanotechnology."

It takes upward of five years to get a new structural material certified for aviation use, so Wang said he expects buckypaper's first uses will be for electromagnetic interference shielding and lightning-strike protection on aircraft.

Electrical circuits and even natural causes such as the sun or Northern Lights can interfere with radios and other electronic gear. Buckypaper provides up to four times the shielding specified in a recent Air Force contract proposal, Wang said.

Typically, conventional composite materials have a copper mesh added for lightning protection. Replacing copper with buckypaper would save weight and fuel.

Wang demonstrated this with a composite model plane and a stun gun. Zapping an unprotected part of the model caused sparks to fly. The electric jolt, though, passed harmlessly across another section shielded by a strip of buckypaper.

Other near-term uses would be as electrodes for fuel cells, super capacitors and batteries, Wang said. Next in line, buckypaper could be a more efficient and lighter replacement for graphite sheets used in laptop computers to dissipate heat, which is harmful to electronics.

The long-range goal is to build planes, automobiles and other things with buckypaper composites. The military also is looking at it for use in armor plating and stealth technology.

"Our plan is perhaps in the next 12 months we'll begin maybe to have some commercial products," Wang said. "Nanotubes obviously are no longer just lab wonders. They have real world potential. It's real."

Last edited by alkemical; 10-18-2008 at 05:44 PM.. Reason: Thanks to the poster who sent me this in a PM!
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Old 10-18-2008, 08:37 PM   #605
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008...of-buckypaper/


Future planes, cars may be made of `buckypaper’

The Associated Press

Fri, Oct 17, 2008 (9:18 a.m.)

It's called "buckypaper" and looks a lot like ordinary carbon paper, but don't be fooled by the cute name or flimsy appearance. It could revolutionize the way everything from airplanes to TVs are made.

Buckypaper is 10 times lighter but potentially 500 times stronger than steel when sheets of it are stacked and pressed together to form a composite. Unlike conventional composite materials, though, it conducts electricity like copper or silicon and disperses heat like steel or brass.

"All those things are what a lot of people in nanotechnology have been working toward as sort of Holy Grails," said Wade Adams, a scientist at Rice University.

That idea _ that there is great future promise for buckypaper and other derivatives of the ultra-tiny cylinders known as carbon nanotubes _ has been floated for years now. However, researchers at Florida State University say they have made important progress that may soon turn hype into reality.

Buckypaper is made from tube-shaped carbon molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair. Due to its unique properties, it is envisioned as a wondrous new material for light, energy-efficient aircraft and automobiles, more powerful computers, improved TV screens and many other products.

So far, buckypaper can be made at only a fraction of its potential strength, in small quantities and at a high price. The Florida State researchers are developing manufacturing techniques that soon may make it competitive with the best composite materials now available.

"If this thing goes into production, this very well could be a very, very game-changing or revolutionary technology to the aerospace business," said Les Kramer, chief technologist for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, which is helping fund the Florida State research.

The scientific discovery that led to buckypaper virtually came from outer space.

In 1985, British scientist Harry Kroto joined researchers at Rice for an experiment to create the same conditions that exist in a star. They wanted to find out how stars, the source of all carbon in the universe, make the element that is a main building block of life.

Everything went as planned with one exception.

"There was an extra character that turned up totally unexpected," recalled Kroto, now at Florida State heading a program that encourages the study of math, science and technology in public schools. "It was a discovery out of left field."

The surprise guest was a molecule with 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. To Kroto, it also looked like the geodesic domes promoted by Buckminster Fuller, an architect, inventor and futurist. That inspired Kroto to name the new molecule buckminsterfullerene, or "buckyballs" for short.

For their discovery of the buckyball _ the third form of pure carbon to be discovered after graphite and diamonds _ Kroto and his Rice colleagues, Robert Curl Jr. and Richard E. Smalley, were awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1996.

Separately, Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima developed a tube-shaped variation while doing research at Arizona State University.

Researchers at Smalley's laboratory then inadvertently found that the tubes would stick together when disbursed in a liquid suspension and filtered through a fine mesh, producing a thin film _ buckypaper.

The secret of its strength is the huge surface area of each nanotube, said Ben Wang, director of Florida State's High-Performance Materials Institute.

"If you take a gram of nanotubes, just one gram, and if you unfold every tube into a graphite sheet, you can cover about two-thirds of a football field," Wang said.

Carbon nanotubes are already beginning to be used to strengthen tennis rackets and bicycles, but in small amounts. The epoxy resins used in those applications are 1 to 5 percent carbon nanotubes, which are added in the form of a fine powder. Buckypaper, which is a thin film rather than a powder, has a much higher nanotube content _ about 50 percent.

One challenge is that the tubes clump together at odd angles, limiting their strength in buckypaper. Wang and his fellow researchers found a solution: Exposing the tubes to high magnetism causes most of them to line up in the same direction, increasing their collective strength.

Another problem is the tubes are so perfectly smooth it's hard to hold them together with epoxy. Researchers are looking for ways to create some surface defects _ but not too many _ to improve bonding.

So far, the Florida State institute has been able to produce buckypaper with half the strength of the best existing composite material, known as IM7. Wang expects to close the gap quickly.

"By the end of next year we should have a buckypaper composite as strong as IM7, and it's 35 percent lighter," Wang said.

Buckypaper now is being made only in the laboratory, but Florida State is in the early stages of spinning out a company to make commercial buckypaper.

"These guys have actually demonstrated materials that are capable of being used on flying systems," said Adams, director of Rice's Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. "Having something that you can hold in your hand is an accomplishment in nanotechnology."

It takes upward of five years to get a new structural material certified for aviation use, so Wang said he expects buckypaper's first uses will be for electromagnetic interference shielding and lightning-strike protection on aircraft.

Electrical circuits and even natural causes such as the sun or Northern Lights can interfere with radios and other electronic gear. Buckypaper provides up to four times the shielding specified in a recent Air Force contract proposal, Wang said.

Typically, conventional composite materials have a copper mesh added for lightning protection. Replacing copper with buckypaper would save weight and fuel.

Wang demonstrated this with a composite model plane and a stun gun. Zapping an unprotected part of the model caused sparks to fly. The electric jolt, though, passed harmlessly across another section shielded by a strip of buckypaper.

Other near-term uses would be as electrodes for fuel cells, super capacitors and batteries, Wang said. Next in line, buckypaper could be a more efficient and lighter replacement for graphite sheets used in laptop computers to dissipate heat, which is harmful to electronics.

The long-range goal is to build planes, automobiles and other things with buckypaper composites. The military also is looking at it for use in armor plating and stealth technology.

"Our plan is perhaps in the next 12 months we'll begin maybe to have some commercial products," Wang said. "Nanotubes obviously are no longer just lab wonders. They have real world potential. It's real."
As soon as they can massproduce Buckmeister fullerene nanotubes they should build a space elevator. Using it for anything else is a waste.
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Old 10-19-2008, 09:44 AM   #606
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http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2...anthrax-s.html

Not a single case of human anthrax has been reported in the United States this year, but the nation is now officially in a state of anthrax emergency.

The emergency was declared earlier this month by the Department of Health and Human Services, and will last until 2015. Whether it will protect public health is debatable, but it will certainly protect makers of faulty anthrax vaccines.

Emergency exemption from legal liability is granted to vaccine manufacturers by the Public Readiness and Preparedness Act, passed in 2005 to protect against paralyzing lawsuits during outbreaks of anthrax, avian influenza or other potentially pandemic diseases.

The act is supposed to be invoked when the Secretary of Homeland Security has determined "that there is a domestic emergency, or a significant potential for a domestic emergency, involving a heightened risk of attack with a specified biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear agent or agents."

But as Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff explains in a letter to the DHHS, none of these conditions are met: there's neither emergency nor heightened risk of attack nor "credible information indicating an imminent threat of an attack." But that doesn't matter.

"These findings are not necessary to make a determination," Chertoff wrote. It's enough that anthrax was declared a threat four years ago, and that "were the government to determine in the future that there is a heightened risk of an anthrax attack ... that determination would almost certainly result in a domestic emergency."

In other words, there could be an emergency someday — so we might as well declare an emergency now.

Beyond the tortured logic, there's something not quite right about this. Could it have something to do with the fact that the federal government has spent nearly a billion dollars on anthrax vaccines of questionable efficacy and safety?

The CDC's vaccine committee meets next week to discuss anthrax vaccines. It will be interesting to see what they say.
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Old 10-20-2008, 08:22 AM   #607
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http://www.skilluminati.com/research...cking_devices/

From the "Don't Ever Call Me Paranoid Again" files:

The Washington Post reported something remarkable: "Cellphone Tracking Powers on Request," an article that plainly states that law enforcement and intelligence agencies routinely track US citizens through their cell phone's GPS capability. Please remember that I'm not being alarmist. I personally accepted the fact I live in a total surveillance police state awhile back. Rather than view that as a prison, I've decided to treat it like a stage. This is not a crisis, this is not a nightmare, this is just the world that you and I happen to live in.

With that said: the United States government military-intelligence complex has data on the daily routines of all US cell phone users. As you're no doubt aware, any and all cellular phones are also GPS tracking devices. They happen to be somewhere between convenient and nescessary, so many of us are carrying around these tracking devices voluntarily.

The issue is taking on greater relevance as wireless carriers are racing to offer sleek services that allow cellphone users to know with the touch of a button where their friends or families are. The companies are hoping to recoup investments they have made to meet a federal mandate to provide enhanced 911 (E911) location tracking. Sprint Nextel, for instance, boasts that its "loopt" service even sends an alert when a friend is near, "putting an end to missed connections in the mall, at the movies or around town."

With Verizon's Chaperone service, parents can set up a "geofence" around, say, a few city blocks and receive an automatic text message if their child, holding the cellphone, travels outside that area.

"Most people don't realize it, but they're carrying a tracking device in their pocket," said Kevin Bankston of the privacy advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Cellphones can reveal very precise information about your location, and yet legal protections are very much up in the air."

Further:

"Law enforcement routinely now requests carriers to continuously 'ping' wireless devices of suspects to locate them when a call is not being made . . . so law enforcement can triangulate the precise location of a device and [seek] the location of all associates communicating with a target," wrote Christopher Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA -- the Wireless Association, in a July comment to the Federal Communications Commission. He said the "lack of a consistent legal standard for tracking a user's location has made it difficult for carriers to comply" with law enforcement agencies' demands.
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Old 10-20-2008, 08:41 AM   #608
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http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/dyso...n05_index.html


My visit to Google? Despite the whimsical furniture and other toys, I felt I was entering a 14th-century cathedral — not in the 14th century but in the 12th century, while it was being built. Everyone was busy carving one stone here and another stone there, with some invisible architect getting everything to fit. The mood was playful, yet there was a palpable reverence in the air. "We are not scanning all those books to be read by people," explained one of my hosts after my talk. "We are scanning them to be read by an AI."

When I returned to highway 101, I found myself recollecting the words of Alan Turing, in his seminal paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence, a founding document in the quest for true AI. "In attempting to construct such machines we should not be irreverently usurping His power of creating souls, any more than we are in the procreation of children," Turing had advised. "Rather we are, in either case, instruments of His will providing mansions for the souls that He creates."



http://www.skilluminati.com/research..._intelligence/



"Every engineer is able to take 20 percent of their time to work on non-core projects. Google News came out of that. We want to hire the best people and for them to work on the projects that they need to but we also want them to innovate. Most teams contain from three to five engineers. At our company if you have 20 people working on something then the project is not working," said Levick.

Google has given some insights into its AI work in the past. Speaking in 2003, Google Senior Research Scientist Mehran Sahami explained that Google News was using AI techniques to handle information.

"AI applications are using the infrastructure to get people useful information in interesting ways," said Sahami, according to reports. "There is no human intervention. Google News is an example of where AI is making a huge difference. It's used several million times a day," he added.

Sahami also reportedly hinted at AI-based research in progress at Google that has yet to be deployed, such as voice-driven search and query results clustering to help users navigate. "We want to combine information retrieval, large systems, and AI to work together towards the next generation of search engines," he said.
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Old 10-20-2008, 08:46 AM   #609
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
http://www.skilluminati.com/research...cking_devices/

From the "Don't Ever Call Me Paranoid Again" files:

The Washington Post reported something remarkable: "Cellphone Tracking Powers on Request," an article that plainly states that law enforcement and intelligence agencies routinely track US citizens through their cell phone's GPS capability. Please remember that I'm not being alarmist. I personally accepted the fact I live in a total surveillance police state awhile back. Rather than view that as a prison, I've decided to treat it like a stage. This is not a crisis, this is not a nightmare, this is just the world that you and I happen to live in.

With that said: the United States government military-intelligence complex has data on the daily routines of all US cell phone users. As you're no doubt aware, any and all cellular phones are also GPS tracking devices. They happen to be somewhere between convenient and nescessary, so many of us are carrying around these tracking devices voluntarily.

The issue is taking on greater relevance as wireless carriers are racing to offer sleek services that allow cellphone users to know with the touch of a button where their friends or families are. The companies are hoping to recoup investments they have made to meet a federal mandate to provide enhanced 911 (E911) location tracking. Sprint Nextel, for instance, boasts that its "loopt" service even sends an alert when a friend is near, "putting an end to missed connections in the mall, at the movies or around town."

With Verizon's Chaperone service, parents can set up a "geofence" around, say, a few city blocks and receive an automatic text message if their child, holding the cellphone, travels outside that area.

"Most people don't realize it, but they're carrying a tracking device in their pocket," said Kevin Bankston of the privacy advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Cellphones can reveal very precise information about your location, and yet legal protections are very much up in the air."

Further:

"Law enforcement routinely now requests carriers to continuously 'ping' wireless devices of suspects to locate them when a call is not being made . . . so law enforcement can triangulate the precise location of a device and [seek] the location of all associates communicating with a target," wrote Christopher Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA -- the Wireless Association, in a July comment to the Federal Communications Commission. He said the "lack of a consistent legal standard for tracking a user's location has made it difficult for carriers to comply" with law enforcement agencies' demands.
Well, technically most older cell phones do not have GPS capability as doesn't most base models. You can still be tracked with them if you have reception because you can be triangulated using the signal strength of the different transmitters your phone is connected to. This process is slightly slower and more involved than GPS, but is no less effective and is often used by law enforcement and security agencies to locate or track people.
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Old 10-20-2008, 10:03 AM   #610
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Originally Posted by gyldenlove View Post
Well, technically most older cell phones do not have GPS capability as doesn't most base models. You can still be tracked with them if you have reception because you can be triangulated using the signal strength of the different transmitters your phone is connected to. This process is slightly slower and more involved than GPS, but is no less effective and is often used by law enforcement and security agencies to locate or track people.
Also if you have a phone with GPS, the only way to INACTIVE the GPS is to actually turn the phone off and take out the battery -

Of course that might be a good idea anyway

http://www.engadget.com/2006/12/03/f...-on-criminals/

While we figured the NYPD could just install Magic Message Mirrors in every mafia hotspot in the Manhattan area, the Genovese family has proven quite the eagle-eyed bunch when it comes to spotting wiretaps, tailing, and other (failed) attempts of bugging their conversations. In order to tap into critical conversations by known mafioso and other, less glamorous criminals, police are utilizing a "roving bug" technique which remotely activates the microphone of a crime lord's cellie, giving the boys in blue convenient access to their secret agenda(s). The presumably controversial tapping was recently approved by top US DoJ officials "for use against members of a New York organized crime family who were wary of conventional surveillance techniques." Software hacks (and actual phones, too) have previously allowed such dodgy eavesdropping to occur, with "Nextel, Samsung, and Motorola" handsets proving particularly vulnerable, but this widespread approach in tracking down criminal conversations could hopefully pinpoint future targets where prior attempts failed. Of course, if mafia members hit the internet every now and then, they're probably removing those batteries right about now anyway.
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Old 10-20-2008, 12:36 PM   #611
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the westernization of Islam:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7...605106,00.html

'I found Allah in my mango'

Muslim woman in Sweden stunned to find words 'Allah,' 'Muhammad' in her mango

Roee Nahmias
Published: 10.04.08, 17:35 / Israel News

Rubina Sheikh, a Muslim woman residing in Sweden, sliced open a mango and noticed black lines in it that formed the Arabic words "Allah" and "Muhammad," which are holy to Muslims, a local newspaper reported.


"I sliced the fruit into two and noticed that the word 'Allah' was on one half while the word 'Muhammad' was on the other half," Sheikh told the newspaper. "It's a miracle, a sign from Allah."


Ever since word of this wonder got out, Muslims have been flocking to the woman's home in order to see it for themselves. However, a professor at a nearby university who is an expert on Islam says the discovery is not that dramatic.


“There are 14 recognized ways to create the word ‘Allah’. When you think about how many mangoes there are out there, it’s not strange that one of them has a pattern which can be interpreted to be the right combination of characters,” Jan Hjärpe told a local newspaper.
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:13 PM   #612
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http://cbs2chicago.com/local/clown.l....2.840772.html

Cops: Man Is Dressing As Clown To Lure Kids
Offender Spotted On South Side
CHICAGO (STNG) ― A man wearing clown make-up and a wig is using balloons in an attempt to lure children into his vehicle on the South Side. Police issued the alert about a week after a man with similar description was spotted on the West Side.

The incidents were reported in the 8300 block of South Mackinaw and the 10000 block of South Normal, according to a community alert by Calumet Area detectives.

The man, who wears clown make-up and a wig, approached children with balloons attempting to lure them into his vehicle, but the children ran and called 911, the alert said.

The attempted kidnapping/child abduction occurred on Oct. 7 at 5:55 p.m. and Oct. 10 at 8:55 a.m., the alert said.

Last week Harrison Area detectives issued an alert for a man matching a similar description.

That suspect was seen on foot in the Garfield Park neighborhood and near Beidler Elementary School, 3151 W. Walnut St. and Polaris Charter Academy, 620 N. Sawyer Ave., according to a community alert from Harrison Area detectives.

In both alerts police said the suspect was driving a white four-door van or brown pickup truck.

Anyone with information or see any suspicious person should call detectives, (312) 747-8272.

(Source: Sun-Times News Group Wire © Chicago Sun-Times 2006. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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Old 10-20-2008, 01:20 PM   #613
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Margaret Cho on Christians and Christianity:

Don’t ****ing question my Christianity you ****ing idiot a-holes. If you continue to have a problem, then talk to God about it, not me, you ****ing racist homophobic misogynist fake Christian ****heads. God thinks it is funny that I swear so much. He said I could use his name in vain or whatever. He just wants me to use it. He loves me. So **** you. And I guess he loves you too. Even though you are fake Christian a-holes. If you were truly Christians, you would let gays get married, and send them ****ing presents from Bed Bath and Beyond!
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:26 PM   #614
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http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/200809...u6N4CnRzYDW7oF

Do We Live in a Giant Cosmic Bubble?

Earth may be trapped in an abnormal bubble of space-time that is particularly void of matter. Scientists say this condition could account for the apparent acceleration of the universe's expansion, for which dark energy currently is the leading explanation.

Dark energy is the name given to the hypothetical force that could be drawing all the stuff in the universe outward at an ever-increasing rate. Current thinking is that 74 percent of the universe could be made up of this exotic dark energy, with another 21 percent being dark matter, and normal matter comprising the remaining 5 percent.

Until now, there has been no good way to choose between dark energy or the void explanation, but a new study outlines a potential test of the bubble scenario.

If we were in an unusually sparse area of the universe, then things could look farther away than they really are and there would be no need to rely on dark energy as an explanation for certain astronomical observations.

"If we lived in a very large under-density, then the space-time itself wouldn't be accelerating," said researcher Timothy Clifton of Oxford University in England. "It would just be that the observations, if interpreted in the usual way, would look like they were."

Scientists first detected the acceleration by noting that distant supernovae seemed to be moving away from us faster than they should be. One type of supernova (called Type Ia) is a useful distance indicator, because the explosions always have the same intrinsic brightness. Since light gets dimmer the farther it travels, that means that when the supernovae appear faint to us, they are far away, and when they appear bright, they are closer in.

But if we happened to be in a portion of the universe with less matter in it than normal, then the space-time around us would be different than it is outside, because matter warps space-time. Light travelling from supernovae outside our bubble would appear dimmer, because the light would diverge more than we would expect once it got inside our void.

One problem with the void idea, though, is that it negates a principle that has reined in astronomy for more than 450 years: namely, that our place in the universe isn't special. When Nicholas Copernicus argued that it made much more sense for the Earth to be revolving around the sun than vice versa, it revolutionized science. Since then, most theories have to pass the Copernican test. If they require our planet to be unique, or our position to be exalted, the ideas often seem unlikely.

"This idea that we live in a void would really be a statement that we live in a special place," Clifton told SPACE.com. "The regular cosmological model is based on the idea that where we live is a typical place in the universe. This would be a contradiction to the Copernican principle."

Clifton, along with Oxford researchers Pedro G. Ferreira and Kate Land, say that in coming years we may be able to distinguish between dark energy and the void. They point to the upcoming Joint Dark Energy Mission, planned by NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy to launch in 2014 or 2015. The satellite aims to measure the expansion of the universe precisely by observing about 2,300 supernovae.

The scientists suggest that by looking at a large number of supernovae in a certain region of the universe, they should be able to tell whether the objects are really accelerating away, or if their light is merely being distorted in a void.

The new study will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:27 PM   #615
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http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...tts-portable-r

Waste to Watts: Portable Refinery Transforms Trash into Power
Kitchen trash stinks, unless it can be turned into electricity, starting in Army field kitchens

By David Biello
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:46 PM   #616
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http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Make_a_Faraday_Cage_Wallet

Make a Faraday Cage Wallet
October 17th, 2008 by Klintron

From Wired How-To Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

You already have your tin foil hat, and you’re pretty sure no one can find you on the Google. However, there’s one detail you may not have thought of, and that’s those pesky RFID chips.

RFID tags identifying who and — gasp! —- where you are can be found in passports, ATM cards, credit cards and some state-issued ID cards. The same technology will possibly even be used in paper money in the near future.

With the right equipment, these chips can be read from afar by data snoops or your friendly government official. A Faraday cage is sufficient for blocking such eavesdropping.

Here’s how to hide yourself from both the baddies and The Man.
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:58 PM   #617
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...ady-years.html

Disappearing act: The invisibility cloak that will be ready in five years

It works by bending light around itself like the flow of water around a stone, which would make both the electromagnetic cloak and the object inside hidden.

'The whole idea behind metamaterials is to create materials designed and engineered out of artificial atoms, meta-atoms, which are smaller than the wavelengths of light itself,' Professor Vladminr Shalaev said.

In his study reported in the journal Science, Shalaev used an array of tiny needles radiating outward from a central spoke, like a round hairbrush, that would bend light around the object being cloaked inside.

These tiny needles decrease the refraction or distortion of the light to almost zero, rendering it invisible.

'Whereas relativity demonstrates the curved nature of space and time, we are able to curve space for light, and we can design and engineer tiny devices to do this,' he said.

He added that as well as bending light they could do the opposite - concentrating light in one area.

The new technique could be used to create optical microscopes so powerful they would make DNA visible to the naked eye and superfast computer microchips.
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:00 PM   #618
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1016132836.htm

New Solar Energy Material Captures Every Color Of The Rainbow

ScienceDaily (Oct. 17, 2008) — Researchers have created a new material that overcomes two of the major obstacles to solar power: it absorbs all the energy contained in sunlight, and generates electrons in a way that makes them easier to capture.
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:01 PM   #619
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...scicoma115.xml

Magnet treatment awakens car crash victim from coma
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:02 PM   #620
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http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle4974912.ece

Bankers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your bonuses, houses in Esher, holidays in the Caribbean and your Jermyn Street shirts. The upside is that you have the time, at last, to read the complete works of Karl Marx.

The prophet of revolutionaries everywhere, the scourge of capitalism, is enjoying a comeback.

In Germany Das Kapital, which for the past decade has been used mainly as a doorstop, is flying off the shelves as the newly disenfranchised business class tries to work out the root of the present crisis.

“Marx is fashionable again,” declares Jörn Schütrumpf, head of the Berlin publishing house Dietz, which brings out the works of Marx and his collaborator Friedrich Engels. Sales have trebled – albeit from a pretty low level – since 2005 and have soared since the summer.
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:15 PM   #621
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...cibrain116.xml

DIY brain therapy could halt migraines
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:39 AM   #622
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http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article6826.html

JPMorgan Responsible for the Destruction of U.S. Financial System
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:43 AM   #623
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http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle4969312.ece

Passports will be needed to buy mobile phones

Everyone who buys a mobile telephone will be forced to register their identity on a national database under government plans to extend massively the powers of state surveillance.

Phone buyers would have to present a passport or other official form of identification at the point of purchase. Privacy campaigners fear it marks the latest government move to create a surveillance society.

A compulsory national register for the owners of all 72m mobile phones in Britain would be part of a much bigger database to combat terrorism and crime. Whitehall officials have raised the idea of a register containing the names and addresses of everyone who buys a phone in recent talks with Vodafone and other telephone companies, insiders say.

The move is targeted at monitoring the owners of Britain’s estimated 40m prepaid mobile phones. They can be purchased with cash by customers who do not wish to give their names, addresses or credit card details.
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:45 AM   #624
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http://www.physorg.com/news143380532.html

Colossal black holes common in early universe
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Old 10-21-2008, 08:20 AM   #625
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http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/de...5812&bolum=100

Amazonian queen excavations reveal ancient palace in Şanlıurfa
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