The Orange Mane -  a Denver Broncos Fan Community  

Go Back   The Orange Mane - a Denver Broncos Fan Community > Jibba Jabba > War, Religion and Politics Thread
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Chat Room Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-02-2011, 08:04 AM   #2926
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://boingboing.net/2011/11/01/why...Boing+Boing%29

Why being wrong makes us angry
from Boing Boing by Maggie Koerth-Baker

Christie Aschwanden is a science journalist. Last month, she joined a lot of other science journalists at the National Association of Science Writers conference and gave a short Ignite presentation about why people get angry when presented with evidence that their beliefs are wrong. She's posted a storyboard of the presentation to The Last Word on Nothing blog. It's definitely worth a read.

I’m married to an amazing guy. Dave is like those honeybees that always know the way back to the hive. Me, I’ve gotten myself lost in the Hearst building. We’ll be hiking and we’ll come to a split in the trail and I’ll point one way and say, we need to go here. And Dave will say no, actually, this is the right way (as he points in the opposite direction). And I’ll insist that, no, this is the way.

And then he’ll point out that my way peters out below some cliff face. Which only pisses me off. The more evidence he shows me that I’m wrong, the more insistent I become — I’m right and he’s wrong. And it’s not just me. This political scientist named Brendan Nyhan at Dartmouth has documented what happens when you show people evidence that their beliefs are wrong.

So when Dave tells me that his way is right and mine is straight up a cliff, I think, oh yeah? Well I’m smart, independent and capable, so therefore I’m correct. I would never point us in the wrong direction. See, it’s never really about the hiking trail. It’s about some bigger story you’ve told yourself. I’m not taking issue with Dave’s direction. I know he’s right. But the factual mumbo jumbo he’s showing me clashes with the story I’ve told myself. I don’t like what it says about me.

Ouch. I know I've had experiences very much like that one before. I'm sure you have, too. What we believe about ourselves affects how we react to people who show us that we are wrong about something.

What's interesting to me about this, though, is that I don't react this way when I prove my own beliefs wrong. For instance, when I hear about a new study, and then have to dig into the evidence that presents a different perspective than the one I originally came up with. In fact, I kind of like doing that. But, then, challenging my own beliefs makes me feel more capable. It fits the story I tell me about myself.

I came away from this thinking two things. First, maybe we all need more opportunities to comfortably challenge our own ideas. (Although, I'm not sure how to create that space. Especially to cover the things that really matter.) Second, we all (me included) need to remember that being questioned—and being wrong—doesn't mean there's something wrong with us.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:12 AM   #2927
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boing...-honeypot.html

Anonymous vs. Zetas: is #OpCartel a flop, hoax, or honeypot?
from Boing Boing by Xeni Jardin

[Video Link] Over the last few days, word has spread of a purported #antisec operation by Anonymous against the most brutal of all Mexican drug cartels, Los Zetas. What was unusual about the way this story spread, however, was the speed at which it was amplified by credulous reports from larger media outlets. This op got lots of press, fast. Faster, in fact, than it got support from Anons.

Geraldine Juarez and Renata Avila were two of the earlier voices I read expressing doubt about the prevailing storyline—a report by Juarez is here. Some I spoke to within Mexico wondered if the Mexican government (no bastion of purity) might be involved.

At the New York Times, writer Damien Cave digs in here on why the story is important.

And over at Wired News, a must-read piece by Quinn Norton that cinches the deal for me (and in it, she references the aforementioned Global Voices item). Quinn's been covering Anonymous extensively for some time, and I trust her spidey sense on this one.

"Everyone, Anonymous and not, seems to agree that going after the Zetas, who are known for hanging people by their own intestines, would be a new level of ambitious, and might even be the point where Anonymous would bite off more than they could chew," Quinn writes. "But there’s some nagging problems with the video that proposes the op."

Read the rest at Wired.

Of course, this, too, could be wrong (or, not the whole story).

As Damien Cave replied to this post just now, "Boing Boing is right to doubt #opcartel, but remember the Mexican context of fear. If it doesn't happen, it may not be a hoax. It may be that people have been scared off."

And that's the one thing Anonymous and the cartels have in common: the truth about their activities can be really hard to figure out.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:19 AM   #2928
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boing...e-regimes.html

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has more information on Blue Coat, a US company whose "deep packet inspection" products are being used by the Syrian secret police with reportedly horrific consequences for Syrians who dare to express dissent online. Blue Coat denied knowledge of the products' use in Syria, then changed their tune after incontrovertible evidence surfaced. Now they've told the WSJ that they don't want their products used in Syria because it's illegal to sell technology to Syria.

But what they haven't said is, "We don't want our products used in Syria because they're being used to figure out who to kidnap, torture, and murder."

And they haven't said, "We'll stop selling our products to countries like Qatar, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia" -- repressive states (that are legal to sell technology to) where Blue Coat's products are used in the same fashion as in Syria.

In other words, Blue Coat is only concerned about breaking the law, not about helping in human rights violations. Depending on the program, criminal penalties for violating OFAC regulations can range from $50,000 to $10 million with imprisonment ranging from 10 to 30 years for "willful violations."

Given Blue Coat's early denials, we're skeptical that their violation wasn't willful. As Andrew McLaughlin put it in a tweet, "Shame on Blue Coat. Their denials re knowingly assisting Syria censorship don't ring true."

Blue Coat's blatant lack of concern for human rights is alarming. There are far more repressive regimes in the world than there are embargoed countries. Several United States allies, including Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar, are also using Blue Coat systems for censorship and surveillance. But Blue Coat is surely unconcerned; after all, exporting to those countries isn't against the law; it just helps violate the human rights of the people living under those regimes.

Meanwhile, the list of Syrians detained for blogging or other online activities continues to grow.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:22 AM   #2929
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boing...r-traffic.html

DHS seeks intelligence on "domestic threats" from Twitter traffic
from Boing Boing by Xeni Jardin
Popular uprisings in the Mideast and North Africa, and now, Occupy Wall street: all examples of popular unrest powered in part by Twitter and other online social networks. In response, the U.S. government is reported to now be developing guidelines for culling intel from social media, according to a Homeland Security official.

Department of Homeland Security Undersecretary Caryn Wagner said the use of such technology in uprisings that started in December in Tunisia shocked some officials into attention and prompted questions of whether the U.S. needs to do a better job of monitoring domestic social networking activity.

"We're still trying to figure out how you use things like Twitter as a source," she said. "How do you establish trends and how do you then capture that in an intelligence product?"

Wagner said the department is establishing guidelines on gleaning information from sites such as Twitter and Facebook for law enforcement purposes. Wagner says those protocols are being developed under strict laws meant to prevent spying on U.S. citizens and protect privacy, including rules dictating the length of time the information can be stored and differences between domestic and international surveillance.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:33 AM   #2930
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2011/1...sa-patriot-act

Ten Years After the Patriot Act, a Look at Three of the Most Dangerous Provisions Affecting Ordinary Americans
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:42 AM   #2931
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boing...r-youtube.html

SOPA: US House of Reps copyright bill proposes national censorship, attacks on hosting services, Twitter, YouTube


PROTECT-IP is a US Senate bill that establishes a draconian censorship and surveillance regime in America in the name of protecting copyright. Its House version, SOPA, has just been introduced, and it's even worse than PROTECT-IP. Much, much worse:

As with its Senate-side evil sister, PROTECT-IP, SOPA would require service providers to “disappear” certain websites, endangering Internet security and sending a troubling message to the world: it’s okay to interfere with the Internet, even effectively blacklisting entire domains, as long as you do it in the name of IP enforcement. Of course blacklisting entire domains can mean turning off thousands of underlying websites that may have done nothing wrong. And in what has to be an ironic touch, the very first clause of SOPA states that it shall not be “construed to impose a prior restraint on free speech.” As if that little recitation could prevent the obvious constitutional problem in what the statute actually does.

But it gets worse. Under this bill, service providers (including hosting services) would be under new pressure to monitor and police their users’ activities. Websites that simply don’t do enough to police infringement (and it is not at all clear what would qualify as “enough”) are now under threat, even though the DMCA expressly does not require affirmative policing. It creates new enforcement tools against folks who dare to help users access sites that may have been “blacklisted,” even without any kind of court hearing. The bill also requires that search engines, payment providers (such as credit card companies and PayPal), and advertising services join in the fun in shutting down entire websites. In fact, the bill seems mainly aimed at creating an end-run around the DMCA safe harbors. Instead of complying with the DMCA, a copyright owner may now be able to use these new provisions to effectively shut down a site by cutting off access to its domain name, its search engine hits, its ads, and its other financing even if the safe harbors would apply.

Disastrous IP Legislation Is Back – And It’s Worse than Ever
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 08:54 AM   #2932
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default Douglas Rushkoff has an interesting perspective on OWS: "It is not a protest, but a prototype....

Rushkoff: OWS is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living.


from Boing Boing by Mark Frauenfelder
As usual, Douglas Rushkoff has an interesting perspective on OWS: "It is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living. "

But “Occupy” is anything but a protest movement. That’s why it has been so hard for news agencies to express or even discern the “demands” of the growing legions of Occupy participants around the nation, and even the world. Just like pretty much everyone else on the planet, occupiers may want many things to happen and other things to stop, but the occupation is not about making demands. They don’t want anything from you, and there is nothing you can do to make them stop. That’s what makes Occupy so very scary and so very promising. It is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living.

Now don’t get me wrong. The Occupiers are not proposing a world in which we all live outside on pavement and sleep under tarps. Most of us do not have the courage, stamina, or fortitude to work as hard as these kids are working, anyway. (Yes, they work harder than pretty much anyone but a farmer or coal miner could understand.) The urban survival camps they are setting up around the world are a bit more like showpieces, congresses, and “beta” tests of ideas and behaviors the rest of may soon be implementing in our communities, and in our own ways.

The occupiers are actually forging a robust micro-society of working groups, each one developing new approaches - or reviving old approaches - to long running problems. In just one example, the General Assembly is a new, highly flexible approach to group discussion and consensus building. Unlike parliamentary rules that promote debate, difference, and decision, the General Assembly forges consensus by “stacking” ideas and objections much in the fashion that computer programmers “stack” features. The whole thing is orchestrated through simple hand gestures (think commodities exchange). Elements in the stack are prioritized, and everyone gets a chance to speak. Even after votes, exceptions and objections are incorporated as amendments.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:29 AM   #2933
Kaylore
4 time AFCW Champs
 
Kaylore's Avatar
 
12 straight road division wins

Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ceti Alpha V
Posts: 47,263

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Pat Bowlen
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
Rushkoff: OWS is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living.


from Boing Boing by Mark Frauenfelder
As usual, Douglas Rushkoff has an interesting perspective on OWS: "It is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living. "

But “Occupy” is anything but a protest movement. That’s why it has been so hard for news agencies to express or even discern the “demands” of the growing legions of Occupy participants around the nation, and even the world. Just like pretty much everyone else on the planet, occupiers may want many things to happen and other things to stop, but the occupation is not about making demands. They don’t want anything from you, and there is nothing you can do to make them stop. That’s what makes Occupy so very scary and so very promising. It is not a protest, but a prototype for a new way of living.

Now don’t get me wrong. The Occupiers are not proposing a world in which we all live outside on pavement and sleep under tarps. Most of us do not have the courage, stamina, or fortitude to work as hard as these kids are working, anyway. (Yes, they work harder than pretty much anyone but a farmer or coal miner could understand.) The urban survival camps they are setting up around the world are a bit more like showpieces, congresses, and “beta” tests of ideas and behaviors the rest of may soon be implementing in our communities, and in our own ways.

The occupiers are actually forging a robust micro-society of working groups, each one developing new approaches - or reviving old approaches - to long running problems. In just one example, the General Assembly is a new, highly flexible approach to group discussion and consensus building. Unlike parliamentary rules that promote debate, difference, and decision, the General Assembly forges consensus by “stacking” ideas and objections much in the fashion that computer programmers “stack” features. The whole thing is orchestrated through simple hand gestures (think commodities exchange). Elements in the stack are prioritized, and everyone gets a chance to speak. Even after votes, exceptions and objections are incorporated as amendments.
Typical idealistic hand job for a bunch of rich kids who want to pretend they're changing the world. And this guy praises the stupidest thing about "the protest" that is they have no demands, no leader and no timetable. They just want to live in tents to "change the world" in some nebulous way. They probably don't even agree with each other what the change should look like. "They work harder than coal miners." Yeah staying in a tent while everyone buys food for you is the same as working in a coal mine.

I look forward to when bad weather and boredom sets in. A few of these guys will get violent wanting to fulfill their martyr mentality when the media and everyone starts to ignore them. Then the tear gas crew will move in and clear them out.

Last edited by Kaylore; 11-02-2011 at 09:31 AM..
Kaylore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:34 AM   #2934
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylore View Post
Typical idealistic hand job for a bunch of rich kids who want to pretend they're changing the world. And this guy praises the stupidest thing about "the protest" that is they have no demands, no leader and no timetable. They just want to live in tents to "change the world" in some nebulous way. They probably don't even agree with each other what the change should look like. "They work harder than coal miners." Yeah staying in a tent while everyone buys food for you is the same as working in a coal mine.

I look forward to when bad weather and boredom sets in. A few of these guys will get violent wanting to fulfill their martyr mentality when the media and everyone starts to ignore them. Then the tear gas crew will move in and clear them out.

http://occupyharrisburg.org/what-we-stand-for/

Reverse the Effects of the Citizens United Supreme Court Decision

This decision stated that corporations can spend as much as they want on election campaigns and no disclosure is required whatsoever. Corporations should be highly limited in their ability to contribute to political campaigns no matter what the election and no matter what the form of media. This is in order to ensure that the politicians that are elected are loyal to the people and not to their corporate buyers.


Re-Instate the Glass-Steagall Act

The repeal of the provisions of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 by the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act effectively removed the separation that previously existed between investment banking which issued securities and commercial banks which accepted deposits. The deregulation also removed conflict of interest prohibitions between investment bankers serving as officers of commercial banks. This repeal directly contributed to the severity of the Financial crisis of 2007 - 2011 by allowing Wall Street investment banking firms to gamble with their depositors’ money that was held in commercial banks owned or created by the investment firms.


Pass the Buffet Rule on Fair Taxation

This act would ensure that all American citizens making over one million dollars pay a fair portion of their income to the federal government. This act does not call for a higher tax rate for the ultra-rich as one would logically assume, but rather for a tax rate equivalent to that of the middle class, an extremely reasonable request.


Completely Revamp the Securities and Exchange Commission

This commission must be completely rebuilt to ensure the protection of the American people. It is currently a broken institution that merely perpetuates the corporate domination over the middle class. The new commission must be powerful and well funded, and regulated consistently.


Re-Establish the Public Airwaves

There must be an established order in which presidential candidates debate and campaign on mainstream media. Currently the institutions pick and choose which candidate to give air time, based on their financial interests. These interests directly conflict with the interests of the people, and in order to ensure that voters are given an unbiased, equal view of each candidate, drastic mass-media reforms must be enacted.


Investigate, Arrest and Try the Wall Street Criminals

These corporate moguls clearly broke the law and helped cause the 2008 financial crisis in many notable cases. There is a broad consensus that there is a clear group of people who committed financial crimes and have not been brought to justice. A vigorous and intensive investigation must be conducted to prevent future acts of rampant foul play.


Intense Regulation of the Defense Industry

The wars that our country is engaged in are not wars in the interest of the American people, or for the good of any group of people. These wars are fought for corporate profit, and until reforms are put in place, we will continue to sacrifice our beloved troops to benefit a select few war profiteers. Legislation MUST be put in place to ensure that no institution whatsoever profits from the making of war.


So...what's the problem? If they haven't been violent now, why would that change? Why do you take the talking points from the media about what #Occupy represents?

PS - items 3 & 7 i'd like to understand more before I "support" them. But that's the point of the General Assembly - to make those changes necessary. Direct Democracy...

Last edited by alkemical; 11-02-2011 at 09:49 AM..
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 01:44 PM   #2935
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://tennesseenewspress.com/2011/1...n-tn-highways/

TSA Checkpoints Now On TN Highways

The Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security on Tuesday partnered with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and several other federal and state agencies for a safety enforcement and awareness operation on Tennessee’s interstates and two metropolitan-area bus stations. They are randomly inspecting vehicles on highways in Tennessee.

The random inspections really aren’t any more thorough normal, according to Tennessee Highway Patrol Colonel Tracy Trott who says paying attention to details can make a difference.

“People generally associate the TSA with airport security…but now we have moved on to other forms of transportation, such as highways, buses and railways,” said Kevin McCarthy, TSA federal security director for West Tennessee.

To increase national security, the TSA created Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response, known as VIPR, teams, which consist of federal air marshals, surface transportation security inspectors, transportation security officers, behavior detention officers and explosive detection canine teams.

McCarthy also pointed out that Interstate 40 is one of the country’s a major thoroughfares, being the third longest major west-east interstate highway in the United States after Interstate 90 and Interstate 80. Interstate 40′s western end is in Barstow, Calif. and its eastern end is in Wilmington, N.C.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 05:22 PM   #2936
Punisher
® Kiss the shoes!
 
Punisher's Avatar
 
We run the AFC WOOOOOOO!®

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Broncos Video Vault
Posts: 7,602

Adopt-a-Bronco:
I4jelway7 = God
Default

Punisher is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 07:14 AM   #2937
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.pcworld.com/article/24305...vate_data.html

Facebook was recently invaded by a robot army created by four researchers to demonstrate the ease at which online social networks can be maliciously exploited by the unscrupulous.

With a horde of 102 bogus Facebook friends, the University of British Columbia researchers showed that they could harvest personal information on members not publically available on the social network and that its defenses were inadequate to cope with a large scale infiltration.

During the course of an eight week campaign on Facebook, the researchers gathered 250GB of information from thousands of the social network's members. Their "sockpuppet" bots were "friended" by more than 3000 members and the network reached more than a million profiles.

To launch their mischief on Facebook, the quartet—Yazan Boshmaf, Ildar Muslukhov, Konstantin Beznosov, and Matei Ripeanu—used a new breed of botnet called a socialbot. What distinguishes a socialbot from other kinds of bots is that it's designed to pass itself off as a human being. That allows it to obtain a privileged position in an online social network (OSN). In the case of Facebook, that position would be "friend."

"As socialbots infiltrate a targeted OSN, they can further harvest private users' data such as e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and other personal data that have monetary value," the researchers explained in a paper they plan to present next week month at the Security Applications Conference [PDF] in Orlando, Fla.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 07:42 AM   #2938
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://blog.p2pfoundation.net/deskto...ate/2011/11/02

The Desktop Regulatory State:
The Countervailing Power of Superempowered Individuals

The subject of my previous book — The Homebrew Industrial Revolution: A Low Overhead Manifesto — was the way in which falling capital outlays required for both information and material production was eroding the rationale for large organizations, and shifting the balance of power toward individuals, small groups and networks. In particular, I focused on the radically reduced capital outlays required for manufacturing were giving rise to a low-overhead micromanufacturing economy in which the large quantities of land and capital to which the privileged classes had access were becoming increasingly irrelevant, and the material basis for the factory system and wage employment was collapsing.

In this book, my subject is how the same phenomenon is empowering individuals against the large, powerful institutions — both state and corporate — that previously dominated their lives. The implosion of capital outlays associated with the desktop revolution, and the virtual disappearance of transaction costs of coordinating action associated with the network revolution, have (as Tom Coates has said) eliminated the gap between what can be produced within large hierarchical organizations and what can be produced at home in a wide range of industries: software, publishing, music, education, and journalism among them.

The practical significance of this, which I develop in this book, is that many of the functions of government can be included in that list. The central theme of this book is the potential for networked organization to constrain the exercise of power by large, hierarchical institutions in a way that once required the countervailing power of other large, hierarchical institutions.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 07:44 AM   #2939
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/09/ff_uvb76/

19.10
Inside the Russian Short Wave Radio Enigma

From a lonely rusted tower in a forest north of Moscow, a mysterious shortwave radio station transmitted day and night. For at least the decade leading up to 1992, it broadcast almost nothing but beeps; after that, it switched to buzzes, generally between 21 and 34 per minute, each lasting roughly a second—a nasally foghorn blaring through a crackly ether. The signal was said to emanate from the grounds of a voyenni gorodok (mini military city) near the village of Povarovo, and very rarely, perhaps once every few weeks, the monotony was broken by a male voice reciting brief sequences of numbers and words, often strings of Russian names: “Anna, Nikolai, Ivan, Tatyana, Roman.” But the balance of the airtime was filled by a steady, almost maddening, series of inexplicable tones.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 08:06 AM   #2940
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...urce=pulsenews

Welcome to Bazaaristan
Photos from the $10 trillion shadow economy.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 08:08 AM   #2941
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...nomy?page=full

The Shadow Superpower
Forget China: the $10 trillion global black market is the world's fastest growing economy -- and its future.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 08:14 AM   #2942
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

Those last two links from fp.com are worth the read. Spend the moments to check them out.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 08:26 AM   #2943
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.slate.com/articles/health...ar.single.html

The Chemist's War
The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition with deadly consequences.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 08:36 AM   #2944
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...arden_plot.htm

Garden Plot / CONPLAN 2502 (Civil Disturbance Operations)

Use of the military to support civil authorities stems from core national values as expressed in the Constitution. Article I, Section 8 states, "Congress shall have power... to provide for calling forth the Militia to execute laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections, and repel Invasions." Article II, Section 3 states the President, "...shall take care that the Laws be faithfully executed." The 10th Amendment reads, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it, are reserved to the States respectively...," providing the basis that Federal government support, including DoD assistance, is provided in support of State and local authorities.

The President is authorized by the Constitution and Title 10 (10 USC 331-334) to suppress insurrections, rebellions, and domestic violence. After issuing a Cease and Desist Order, the President issues an executive order that directs the Attorney General and the SECDEF to take appropriate steps to disperse insurgents and restore law and order. The Attorney General is then responsible to coordinate the federal response to domestic civil disturbances. The restrictions of the Posse Comitatus Act no longer apply to federal troops executing the orders of the President to quell the disturbance in accordance with Rules of the Use of Force (RUF) approved by the DoD General Counsel and the Attorney General.

USNORTHCOM Concept Plan (CONPLAN) 2502 (Civil Disturbance Operations), is the plan for supporting state and local authorities during civil disturbances. This plan serves as the foundation for any CDO operation and standardizes most activities and command relationships. Tasks performed by military forces may include joint patrolling with law enforcement officers; securing key buildings, memorials, intersections and bridges; and acting as a quick reaction force. The JTF commander, a general officer, coordinates all DoD support with the Senior Civilian Representative of the Attorney General (SCRAG). DoD will usually establish a JTF headquarters near where the Attorney General's local representative is based.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 12:41 PM   #2945
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.disinfo.com/2011/11/are-you-an-anarchist/

Are You An Anarchist?

Posted by JacobSloan on November 4, 2011

anarchRegardless of what your answer is, David Graeber’s classic essay “Are You An Anarchist? The Answer May Surprise You” is food for thought regarding what is possible. Via the Anarchist Library:

Many people seem to think that anarchists are proponents of violence, chaos, and destruction, that they are against all forms of order and organization, or that they are crazed nihilists who just want to blow everything up. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth. Anarchists are simply people who believe human beings are capable of behaving in a reasonable fashion without having to be forced to. It is really a very simple notion. But it’s one that the rich and powerful have always found extremely dangerous.

At their very simplest, anarchist beliefs turn on to two elementary assumptions. The first is that human beings are, under ordinary circumstances, about as reasonable and decent as they are allowed to be, and can organize themselves and their communities without needing to be told how. The second is that power corrupts. Most of all, anarchism is just a matter of having the courage to take the simple principles of common decency that we all live by, and to follow them through to their logical conclusions. Odd though this may seem, in most important ways you are probably already an anarchist — you just don’t realize it.

Let’s start by taking a few examples from everyday life:

If there’s a line to get on a crowded bus, do you wait your turn and refrain from elbowing your way past others even in the absence of police?

If you answered “yes”, then you are used to acting like an anarchist! The most basic anarchist principle is self-organization: the assumption that human beings do not need to be threatened with prosecution in order to be able to come to reasonable understandings with each other, or to treat each other with dignity and respect.

Everyone believes they are capable of behaving reasonably themselves. If they think laws and police are necessary, it is only because they don’t believe that other people are. But if you think about it, don’t those people all feel exactly the same way about you? Anarchists argue that almost all the anti-social behavior which makes us think it’s necessary to have armies, police, prisons, and governments to control our lives, is actually caused by the systematic inequalities and injustice those armies, police, prisons and governments make possible. It’s all a vicious circle. If people are used to being treated like their opinions do not matter, they are likely to become angry and cynical, even violent – which of course makes it easy for those in power to say that their opinions do not matter. Once they understand that their opinions really do matter just as much as anyone else’s, they tend to become remarkably understanding. To cut a long story short: anarchists believe that for the most part it is power itself, and the effects of power, that make people stupid and irresponsible.

Are you a member of a club or sports team or any other voluntary organization where decisions are not imposed by one leader but made on the basis of general consent?

If you answered “yes”, then you belong to an organization which works on anarchist principles!
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 12:42 PM   #2946
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.kpho.com/story/15896021/c...order-diseases

Parents Using Facebook to Trade Viruses In the Mail to Infect Their Children

Posted by SpaceNeedle on November 5, 2011

Chicken Pox PartyRight, because you’re “afraid” of vaccines, let’s deliberately put pathogens in the mail. Reports KPHO CBS 5 News:

PHOENIX — Doctors and medical experts are concerned about a new trend taking place on Facebook.

Parents are trading live viruses through the mail in order to infect their children. The Facebook group is called “Find a Pox Party in Your Area.” According to the group’s page, it is geared toward “parents who want their children to obtain natural immunity for the chicken pox.”

On the page, parents post where they live and ask if anyone with a child who has the chicken pox would be willing to send saliva, infected lollipops or clothing through the mail. Parents also use the page to set up play dates with children who currently have chicken pox. Medical experts say the most troubling part of this is parents are taking pathogens from complete strangers and deliberately infecting their children.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2011, 12:46 PM   #2947
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1102190400.htm

Nicotine Primes Brain for Cocaine Use

Posted by Good German on November 5, 2011

Man SniffingVia ScienceDaily:

Cigarettes and alcohol serve as gateway drugs, which people use before progressing to the use of marijuana and then to cocaine and other illicit substances; this progression is called the “gateway sequence” of drug use. An article in Science Translational Medicine by study author Denise Kandel, PhD, of the Mailman School of Public Health; and Amir Levine, MD; Eric Kandel, MD; and colleagues at Columbia University Medical Center provides the first molecular explanation for the gateway sequence. They show that nicotine causes specific changes in the brain that make it more vulnerable to cocaine addiction ― a discovery made by using a novel mouse model.

Alternate orders of exposure to nicotine and cocaine were examined. The authors found that pretreatment with nicotine greatly alters the response to cocaine in terms of addiction-related behavior and synaptic plasticity (changes in synaptic strength) in the striatum, a brain region critical for addiction-related rewards.…
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 07:19 AM   #2948
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/24/m...alf-of-all-an/

Microsoft signs Compal deal, now takes money from half of all Android ODMs

alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 12:30 PM   #2949
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default

http://www.disinfo.com/2011/11/penis...-with-animals/

A warning for zoophiles from MSNBC:

For many people, bestiality is a bad joke, but for some it could be a matter of life or death, according to a new study finding that men who had sex with animals in their lifetimes were twice as likely to develop cancer of the penis as others.

The study of 492 men from rural Brazil found that 35 percent of study participants, who ranged from 18 to 80 years old and included both penile cancer patients and healthy men, reported having sex with animals (SWA) in their lifetimes. A team of urologists from centers around Brazil co-authored the paper, which looked at risk factors for penile cancer in men who had visited 16 urology and oncology centers in 12 Brazilian cities. In addition to SWA, three other risk factors for penile cancer were found: smoking, the presence of premalignant lesions on the penis and…

MORE
Posted in: Bestiality, Bizarre, Cancer, medical science, Sex
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 09:06 AM   #2950
alkemical
Guerrilla Ontologist
 
alkemical's Avatar
 
rorrim|mirror

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Future
Posts: 43,095

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Prima Materia
Default How Transparency Will End Tyranny

How Transparency Will End Tyranny

How Transparency Will End Tyranny
By Valkyrie Ice


Quote:
Tyranny relies on isolation. It relies on control of information and making those tyrannized have a worldview that makes them feel isolated and alone. A tyrant wants everyone to be suspicious of everyone else, and to believe that rebelling is pointless because they would be one lone voice that would be quickly silenced. They want people to feel terrified of the “world outside” of the tyranny so that people will tolerate the “lesser of two evils.” But that’s impossible to do with the internet. When people can connect without borders and can talk to people all over the world, isolation is impossible.

But just by itself, the internet is not enough, because, as Egypt again shows, just being connected is not sufficient. There’s a second element that is needed to eradicate tyranny, and that is accountability.

If you are unsure what I mean by “accountability” let me refer you to my blog because a full explanation would greatly exceed my word limit, but in short, let me give you my usual example. If you look at a small tribe, everyone knows everyone else, and if any member is “up to no good” i.e. acting in a manner that jeopardizes the well-being of the tribe for self serving gain, then they are easy to spot, and easy to penalize. They steal food from others, then they don’t get to share in the hunt, or get thrown out of the tribe if it’s bad enough. The internet is allowing us to gradually return to this state of “knowing everyone” again, in the sense that it allows us to create and access records of even the most trivial events, like twits, or, as Jon Stewart often does, pull up video records of political figures saying the exact opposite of what they currently say.
alkemical is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:53 PM.


Denver Broncos