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Old 03-29-2010, 04:53 PM   #151
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god the offseason sucks.
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:05 PM   #152
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god the offseason sucks.
Now, was that necessary? Maybe you need an offseason hobby. I recommend gardening. It's always been good for a volatile guy like myself, calms me down. Maybe you should try it.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:08 AM   #153
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Gardening!!!

Yay! hey guys, i'm "new" to gardening but have caught the bug. I'm going to try to reread this thread, but i'm hoping to learn from you guys and maybe if I can share some things that are going on here.

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Old 03-21-2011, 08:12 AM   #154
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Birds are a total menace to your tomatoes
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:16 AM   #155
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I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:19 AM   #156
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I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.
You doing land gardening, not potted gardening I assume?

Are you using raised beds, or just tilled right into the earth. My mom and dad had a nice garden when we lived in Pueblo. they had to work at it, water of course is a premium.

I will say that the south central area of PA is a gold mine to farm/garden. We have more clay based soil, but it's easy to work with. If you compost and build your soil up, it really mixes well.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:20 AM   #157
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Birds are a total menace to your tomatoes
do you have any cover on them, does it matter?

I'm trying to learn too.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:22 AM   #158
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I got into gardening because I started doing business development for my friend's garden shop.

He created a product called "Recycler" that breaks down Petrol based fertilizers in soil, as well as salts into bio available forms of N/P/K & Amino acids. In a water/hydro based solution this works even better.

We have had some orchid growers really like it, and this year i'm doing a massive test in soil garens to check for root zone size, etc.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:41 AM   #159
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Spent all day yesterday tilling the front yard. I had a old bradford pear tree break during a storm and finally got around to replacing it. It made a mess of my yard with roots and bare spots all over the place. Now I need to learn to lay sod. Not sure if grass growing counts as gardening but I was outside in the dirt.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:48 AM   #160
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do you have any cover on them, does it matter?

I'm trying to learn too.
It doesn't here in Okla them pesky suckers will just fly under the netting
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:01 AM   #161
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Gardening!!!

Yay! hey guys, i'm "new" to gardening but have caught the bug. I'm going to try to reread this thread, but i'm hoping to learn from you guys and maybe if I can share some things that are going on here.

Welcome. I love vegetable gardening, so nice to go pick some lettuce, pole beans, radish, spinach, cukes, green onions, squash that you grew yourself. I like going out first thing in the morning after a cup of coffee, do a little weeding, eat a radish, a green onion, a pole bean, some spinach as I'm weeding.

I recommend grapevines, peach, plum, apple trees also. They involve a lot of trimming, but the reward is nice. You'll make a lot of friends among your neighbors when you go over to their house with a couple bags of fresh fruit and produce from your surplus.

Chilies and peppers are always very popular, but they need a long growing season, broccoli is nice but those are big plants, require a lot of room.

Strawberries are dynamite, require no care at all, plant a lot of them. The difference between a homegrown strawberry and a storebought is amazing. The burst of flavor from homegrown is so much better than storebought.

So good luck, I hope you enjoy it.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:39 AM   #162
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I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.
Aw, come on dude, don't make me laugh. I get tremendous yields.

You want to know how you improve the soil? It's simple, first you thatch your lawn in the spring, and take the dead grass to your garden.

Then, you throw that thatch on the garden before you fork/till the soil so the dead grass is worked into the soil.

Next, you add worms and nightcrawlers. You buy them as fishing bait for $1.50 (or, simply pick them off the sidewalk and street after a rain), throw them in the garden and let them burrow in and feed on the thatched grass.

It works.

The next spring you work the thatched grass into the soil again as you till or fork it, and the system perpetuates itself. No need for fertilizer. It works.

The worms & crawlers add their waste to the soil, further enriching it, and also break up the soil for you during the growing season.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:50 AM   #163
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talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:52 AM   #164
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
You doing land gardening, not potted gardening I assume?

Are you using raised beds, or just tilled right into the earth. My mom and dad had a nice garden when we lived in Pueblo. they had to work at it, water of course is a premium.

I will say that the south central area of PA is a gold mine to farm/garden. We have more clay based soil, but it's easy to work with. If you compost and build your soil up, it really mixes well.
Absolutely composting is a great method for a productive garden. I don't have room for a compost pile, which is why I go with the thatched grass method to enrich the soil and feed the worm population.

Some people use barrells cut in half to compost instead of just throwing it on the ground and turning it over, and that works.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:55 AM   #165
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Welcome. I love vegetable gardening, so nice to go pick some lettuce, pole beans, radish, spinach, cukes, green onions, squash that you grew yourself. I like going out first thing in the morning after a cup of coffee, do a little weeding, eat a radish, a green onion, a pole bean, some spinach as I'm weeding.

I recommend grapevines, peach, plum, apple trees also. They involve a lot of trimming, but the reward is nice. You'll make a lot of friends among your neighbors when you go over to their house with a couple bags of fresh fruit and produce from your surplus.

Chilies and peppers are always very popular, but they need a long growing season, broccoli is nice but those are big plants, require a lot of room.

Strawberries are dynamite, require no care at all, plant a lot of them. The difference between a homegrown strawberry and a storebought is amazing. The burst of flavor from homegrown is so much better than storebought.

So good luck, I hope you enjoy it.
thanks. I'm doing indoor and outdoor gardening. i have a counter top herb garden, and have a few container plants (I rent and don't have much space). But have helped people that should get amazing yeilds here.

I can't wait to make some wine. We got a ton of strawberries and other fruits as well, even grapes!

Should be a fun summer.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:59 AM   #166
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talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.
Start from seed indoors, i used a seed starting pod (not the peat pellets that don't work) - and started them off indoors. I have a few lights to keep them going. then i move them to the garden. i have had a much higher % of success this way, than just seed to earth.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:00 AM   #167
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Absolutely composting is a great method for a productive garden. I don't have room for a compost pile, which is why I go with the thatched grass method to enrich the soil and feed the worm population.

Some people use barrells cut in half to compost instead of just throwing it on the ground and turning it over, and that works.
yep.

I have friends up the road that have 3 chicken coops, so I even have access to waste to help with the gardens.

Not to mention, I get a dozen big assed fresh eggs for about $2/doz.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:05 AM   #168
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all this talk of gardening and im surprised no one has asked "WHERE DA HOES AT"?

prepping my "crops" for the spring..
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:14 AM   #169
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My garden is looking great this year

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Old 03-21-2011, 11:14 AM   #170
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talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.
You have to follow the instructions on the seed package. Some seeds require a certain depth to plant and it's important.

If you're serious about gardening you'll also keep track of what is working in your particular neck of the woods, when is the best time to plant a particular crop, what moths lay their eggs in certain plants, what insects to pinch dead, what insects to let live, etc.

It's a lot about knowing the ropes with gardening. Once you know the ropes (like with any profession), you'll get a great yield and that's where the satisfaction kicks in.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:22 AM   #171
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thanks. I'm doing indoor and outdoor gardening. i have a counter top herb garden, and have a few container plants (I rent and don't have much space). But have helped people that should get amazing yeilds here.

I can't wait to make some wine. We got a ton of strawberries and other fruits as well, even grapes!

Should be a fun summer.
Grapes, plums, peaches, apples are the icing on the cake after a spring and summer of vegetables.
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:06 PM   #172
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Gardening thread, nice. I just bought a house that has a pretty sizable terraced, south facing slope that is ideal for a garden. The house came with a few fruit trees including: meyer lemon, mexican lime (key lime), valencia orange, a couple of peach trees, a pear tree, a couple of tangerine trees, and two concord grape vines. They haven't really been tended to for a couple of years, so there are some issues. The lemon tree was starting to fall over because it was so laden with fruit, and hadn't been pruned in ages, for example. The rest of the garden area is covered in weeds, so I've got my work cut out for me, but I'm pretty excited. The place was a rental for a few years, but apparently when the owner lived there, he had a vegetable garden that the neighbors say was amazing. I'm planning to start planting just one bed this year. I'm thinking some strawberries, cucumbers, maybe some peas or something. Gonna try and weed the other beds and plant some cover crops to get the soil going again. Nice thing about living in San Diego, is that you can get a yard of compost for $6 at the landfill. It's actually free if you hand load it.
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:48 PM   #173
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Gardening thread, nice. I just bought a house that has a pretty sizable terraced, south facing slope that is ideal for a garden. The house came with a few fruit trees including: meyer lemon, mexican lime (key lime), valencia orange, a couple of peach trees, a pear tree, a couple of tangerine trees, and two concord grape vines. They haven't really been tended to for a couple of years, so there are some issues. The lemon tree was starting to fall over because it was so laden with fruit, and hadn't been pruned in ages, for example. The rest of the garden area is covered in weeds, so I've got my work cut out for me, but I'm pretty excited. The place was a rental for a few years, but apparently when the owner lived there, he had a vegetable garden that the neighbors say was amazing. I'm planning to start planting just one bed this year. I'm thinking some strawberries, cucumbers, maybe some peas or something. Gonna try and weed the other beds and plant some cover crops to get the soil going again. Nice thing about living in San Diego, is that you can get a yard of compost for $6 at the landfill. It's actually free if you hand load it.

Sounds like you're pretty well set. Enjoy. Long growing season, you can grow anything from seed which is the cheapest and easiest way. Chilies, tomatoes, squash, cantloupe, they like the long growing season from seed and make good meals.

It's hard to get rid of citrus crops, it's a shame to see them go to waste, but there it is. The only way I get rid of my apples is give them to horse owners.
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Old 03-22-2011, 09:10 AM   #174
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/us...=grange&st=cse

In New Food Culture, a Young Generation of Farmers Emerges

Now, Mr. Jones, 30, and his wife, Alicia, 27, are among an emerging group of people in their 20s and 30s who have chosen farming as a career. Many shun industrial, mechanized farming and list punk rock, Karl Marx and the food journalist Michael Pollan as their influences. The Joneses say they and their peers are succeeding because of Oregon’s farmer-foodie culture, which demands grass-fed and pasture-raised meats.

“People want to connect more than they can at their grocery store,” Ms. Jones said. “We had a couple who came down from Portland and asked if they could collect their own eggs. We said, ‘O.K., sure.’ They want to trust their producer, because there’s so little trust in food these days.”

Garry Stephenson, coordinator of the Small Farms Program at Oregon State University, said he had not seen so much interest among young people in decades. “It’s kind of exciting,” Mr. Stephenson said. “They’re young, they’re energetic and idealist, and they’re willing to make the sacrifices.”

Though the number of young farmers is increasing, the average age of farmers nationwide continues to creep toward 60, according to the 2007 Census of Agriculture. That census, administered by the Department of Agriculture, found that farmers over 55 own more than half of the country’s farmland.

In response, the 2008 Farm Bill included a program for new farmers and ranchers. Last year, the department distributed $18 million to educate young growers across the country.

Tom Vilsack, the secretary of agriculture, said he hoped some beginning farmers would graduate to midsize and large farms as older farmers retired. “I think there needs to be more work in this area,” he said. “It’s great to invest $18 million to reach out to several thousand to get them interested, but the need here is pretty significant. We need to be even more creative than we’ve been to create strategies so that young people can access operations of all sizes.”

The problem, the young farmers say, is access to land and money to buy equipment. Many new to farming also struggle with the basics.
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Old 03-22-2011, 04:22 PM   #175
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I bought a house in Florida and despite never having grown anything successfully (the kid is a work in progress, he might be the first success), I want to look into some plants. Thought you guys might be a good place to look for ideas.

The deal: The house has a great screened in 30x10 patio for grilling and sitting outdoors. The problem: The yard is only like another 10 feet from the patio to the fence (it's wider so there's lawn but the patio takes up much of the lawn in that portion) and I'd like to put something nice there to look at so we're not just staring at privacy fence.

The fence that I'm dealing with is the approximately lateral 4x4 cross sections with alternating 2x6 vertical fence boards. My idea was to get some sort of netting to make a basket between the alternating boards to plant things in and once they blossom out, it could be quite pleasant. If it could be something like a fruit bearing plant for the kid, that'd be a huge plus.

Anyone ever tried something like that? Got ideas? To explain better, here's a photo that I had a professional graphic artist develop.
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