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Old 04-15-2012, 03:49 PM   #351
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I seeded carrots, potatoes. Had snow last night, stats say there's bound to be a hard freeze in the next few weeks, but I don't think it will effect them. The apple tree, the peach tree bloomed, the Concord grape vine leafed already, I don't know how they'll react to a hard freeze. The green grape vine is just barely budding, which is typical. The strawberries are blooming.

I'll seed radish, spinach, peas, green leaf, chard a little earlier this year. Cukes, pole beans and squash I'm thinking a little earlier also.

I love this time of year, turning the soil to prep the vegetable crop.
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Old 04-15-2012, 05:03 PM   #352
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We are picking out the Grubs by the Hundreds today prepping the garden. This is ridiculous.
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:51 AM   #353
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Originally Posted by Cito Pelon View Post
I seeded carrots, potatoes. Had snow last night, stats say there's bound to be a hard freeze in the next few weeks, but I don't think it will effect them. The apple tree, the peach tree bloomed, the Concord grape vine leafed already, I don't know how they'll react to a hard freeze. The green grape vine is just barely budding, which is typical. The strawberries are blooming.

I'll seed radish, spinach, peas, green leaf, chard a little earlier this year. Cukes, pole beans and squash I'm thinking a little earlier also.

I love this time of year, turning the soil to prep the vegetable crop.
If you can, try to tarp or cover your trees for a hard freeze that are flowering. The hard frost will kill the flowers. (maybe, but if you 'need' the fruit...prepare).

cover anything that is 'tender' if you can.



Do you put any mycorrhizae in your plant sites?
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:52 AM   #354
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Originally Posted by Bronco Yoda View Post
We are picking out the Grubs by the Hundreds today prepping the garden. This is ridiculous.
http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showpos...&postcount=337


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Another extremely valuable added benefit of using Re-Cycler is that our strains of hyper-vigorous microbes will overgrow harmful pathogenic microbes that may be present in your environment, thus enabling gardeners to be more effective at proactively managing the health of their plants environment. Re-Cycler eliminates nematodes in the larval stages which is good news for your roots. Re-Cycler “fluffs” up the soil making it spongier, which aides in aeration of the root zone enabling the plants to soak up the nutrients more effectively.

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Old 04-16-2012, 06:04 AM   #355
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Does anyone here use Superthrive?
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:51 AM   #356
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
If you can, try to tarp or cover your trees for a hard freeze that are flowering. The hard frost will kill the flowers. (maybe, but if you 'need' the fruit...prepare).

cover anything that is 'tender' if you can.



Do you put any mycorrhizae in your plant sites?
If there's a hard freeze coming on I'll do my best to cover what I can, the vegetables are easy to cover.

Onions, carrots, potatoes, spinach, peas, radish, they're OK coming back from a hard freeze, no need to worry too much about them. Cukes, beans, lettuce, squash, I hold off on seeding them til early-May to avoid a frost kill.

The fruit trees, grape vines, yeah you take some plastic grocery bags and cover what's budding as best you can.

mycorrrizae I know nothing about, I'll check it out.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:55 AM   #357
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Originally Posted by Bronco Yoda View Post
We are picking out the Grubs by the Hundreds today prepping the garden. This is ridiculous.
Are they injurious to the crops? I'll see one once in a while, but know nothing about them pro or con.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:56 AM   #358
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Originally Posted by Cito Pelon View Post
If there's a hard freeze coming on I'll do my best to cover what I can, the vegetables are easy to cover.

Onions, carrots, potatoes, spinach, peas, radish, they're OK coming back from a hard freeze, no need to worry too much about them. Cukes, beans, lettuce, squash, I hold off on seeding them til early-May to avoid a frost kill.

The fruit trees, grape vines, yeah you take some plastic grocery bags and cover what's budding as best you can.

mycorrrizae I know nothing about, I'll check it out.

Pretty much, you got it down!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycorrhiza

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In a mycorrhizal association, the fungus colonizes the host plant's roots, either intracellularly as in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), or extracellularly as in ectomycorrhizal fungi. They are an important component of soil life and soil chemistry.
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Sugar-Water/Mineral exchange

This mutualistic association provides the fungus with relatively constant and direct access to carbohydrates, such as glucose and sucrose.[4] The carbohydrates are translocated from their source (usually leaves) to root tissue and on to the plant's fungal partners. In return, the plant gains the benefits of the mycelium's higher absorptive capacity for water and mineral nutrients due to the comparatively large surface area of mycelium: root ratio, thus improving the plant's mineral absorption capabilities.[5]

Plant roots alone may be incapable of taking up phosphate ions that are demineralized in soils with a basic pH. The mycelium of the mycorrhizal fungus can, however, access these phosphorus sources, and make them available to the plants they colonize.[6] Nature, according to C.Michael Hogan, has adapted to this critical role of phosphate, by allowing many plants to recycle phosphate, without using soil as an intermediary. For example, in some dystrophic forests large amounts of phosphate are taken up by mycorrhizal hyphae acting directly on leaf litter, bypassing the need for soil uptake.[7] Inga alley cropping, proposed as an alternative to slash and burn rainforest destruction,[8] relies upon Mycorrhiza within the Inga Tree root system to prevent the rain from washing phosphorus out of the soil.[9]

Suillus tomentosus, a fungus, produces specialized structures, known as tuberculate ectomycorrhizae, with its plant host lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia). These structures have in turn been shown to host nitrogen fixing bacteria which contribute a significant amount of nitrogen and allow the pines to colonize nutrient-poor sites.[10]
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Disease and drought resistance

Mycorrhizal plants are often more resistant to diseases, such as those caused by microbial soil-borne pathogens,[13][14] and are also more resistant to the effects of drought.[15][16][17]

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Resistance to toxicity

Fungi have been found to have a protective role for plants rooted in soils with high metal concentrations, such as acidic and contaminated soils. Pine trees inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius planted in several contaminated sites displayed high tolerance to the prevailing contaminant, survivorship and growth. One study discovered the existence of Suillus luteus strains with varying tolerance of zinc. Another study discovered that zinc-tolerant strains of Suillus bovinus conferred resistance to plants of Pinus sylvestris. This was probably due to binding of the metal to the extramatricial mycelium of the fungus, without affecting the exchange of beneficial substances.[20]
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:01 PM   #359
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Are they injurious to the crops? I'll see one once in a while, but know nothing about them pro or con.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nematode

Grubs will eat your roots, then if/when they turn to beetles...they could eat/damage more.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:05 PM   #360
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nematode

Grubs will eat your roots, then if/when they turn to beetles...they could eat/damage more.
IN El Paso they become June bugs all over the place.. they kill the grass by eating the roots and then move on to everything else..

As much as I do not like pesticides they are going down this week..
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:07 PM   #361
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IN El Paso they become June bugs all over the place.. they kill the grass by eating the roots and then move on to everything else..

As much as I do not like pesticides they are going down this week..
Ahem:

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showpos...&postcount=337



It's not a pesticide - it's not anything "unnatural". It's "organic" for what it's worth. You can use it as a spray application to treat an area.

Again - i'm not going to be "salesguy" - but if anyone's interested. Hit me up.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:33 PM   #362
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nematode

Grubs will eat your roots, then if/when they turn to beetles...they could eat/damage more.
confused, your link is for nematodes which are worms. grubs are insects in larvae form. so do the worms eat the roots? maybe you are referring to grubs eating the roots.

when i used a tiller on my garden bed last month, saw many grubs. killed them and left them in the dirt as fertilizer.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:35 PM   #363
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confused, your link is for nematodes which are worms. grubs are insects in larvae form. so do the worms eat the roots? maybe you are referring to grubs eating the roots.

when i used a tiller on my garden bed last month, saw many grubs. killed them and left them in the dirt as fertilizer.
Grubs & Nematodes both eat the roots of the plants. I posted the Nematode link due to the fact that until 2yrs ago...i didn't know WTF they were.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:32 PM   #364
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Originally Posted by lonestar View Post
IN El Paso they become June bugs all over the place.. they kill the grass by eating the roots and then move on to everything else..

As much as I do not like pesticides they are going down this week..
I don't have to deal with a warm weather environment like you do. You have a longer growing season, year-round pretty much, but then again the insects have a year-round growing season also. It's a whole different world where you live at compared to mine.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:21 AM   #365
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I will read up on this. Sounds interesting. I gave up most of our Garden area this year for a dog run. We now only have a small garden spot on the side of the house.

... But I'm considering building a hydroponics tower with 10" PVC pipe with planting holes cut out where the water drips from one to another down the line.

The wife says I'm just looking for an excuse to build something ridiculous. She could be right.

Last edited by Bronco Yoda; 04-18-2012 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:26 AM   #366
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I will read up on this. Sounds interesting. I gave up most of our Garden area this year for a dog run. We now only have a small garden spot on the side of the house.

... But I'm considering building a hydroponics tower with 10" PVC pipe with planting holes cut out where the water drips from one to another down the line.

The wife says I'm just looking for an excuse to build something ridiculous. She could be right.
:ha:

it will work (vertical gardening). We've helped people do strawberry towers like that. Also, have you seen/heard of window farms?

http://www.windowfarms.org/

(you can DIY that)
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Old 04-18-2012, 12:12 PM   #367
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Old 04-18-2012, 12:17 PM   #368
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Vertical is teh way to go if your land usage is limited.
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Old 04-18-2012, 02:01 PM   #369
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Very cool
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Old 04-18-2012, 02:03 PM   #370
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
:ha:

it will work (vertical gardening). We've helped people do strawberry towers like that. Also, have you seen/heard of window farms?

http://www.windowfarms.org/

(you can DIY that)
That looks cool, I would like an outside version on could mount by the patio.
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Old 04-19-2012, 05:30 AM   #371
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That looks cool, I would like an outside version on could mount by the patio.
Here's one example:

► 7:25► 7:25

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcdtIx1PkS8

They give you an idea of how to work PVC for it.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:35 AM   #372
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http://io9.com/5901172/10-pieces-of-...than-you-think

10 Pieces of Evidence That Plants Are Smarter Than You Think

Though plants possess nothing even remotely like brains, they can nevertheless communicate, measure time, and even use camouflage. They may not be thinking in a way that we'd recognize, but our chlorophyll-saturated pals are certainly doing a lot more than sitting around splitting water molecules. Here are ten things plants do that look pretty damn smart — even to those of us over here in the Kingdom Animalia.

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1. Plants communicate with insects
As we've mentioned on io9 before, some plants have evolved a survival strategy that involves the chemical equivalent of sending out a distress call. When tobacco plants are attacked by caterpillars, they release a chemical into the air that attracts predatory bugs who like to eat caterpillars. So the nice smell you get from crushing up leaves may actually be the plant's way of asking its insect buddies to come bite your head off.


http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/5517/talking-plants

PHILADELPHIA: Plants may be able to respond to sounds and even make clicking noises to communicate with each other, according to new research.

If initial results can be confirmed and replicated, the latest findings could change our understanding of how plants sense their environment and communicate with each other. It would also overturn years of scepticism that plants can 'talk' in this way and give lie to the idea that animals are the only organisms capable of such feats.
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Old 04-20-2012, 02:39 PM   #373
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Originally Posted by alkemical View Post
http://io9.com/5901172/10-pieces-of-...than-you-think

10 Pieces of Evidence That Plants Are Smarter Than You Think

Though plants possess nothing even remotely like brains, they can nevertheless communicate, measure time, and even use camouflage. They may not be thinking in a way that we'd recognize, but our chlorophyll-saturated pals are certainly doing a lot more than sitting around splitting water molecules. Here are ten things plants do that look pretty damn smart — even to those of us over here in the Kingdom Animalia.





http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/5517/talking-plants

PHILADELPHIA: Plants may be able to respond to sounds and even make clicking noises to communicate with each other, according to new research.

If initial results can be confirmed and replicated, the latest findings could change our understanding of how plants sense their environment and communicate with each other. It would also overturn years of scepticism that plants can 'talk' in this way and give lie to the idea that animals are the only organisms capable of such feats.
Mother Nature is awesome. I don't delve into the intricacies too much, although I find the intricacies awesome and worthy of speculation as to their origins and evolution. I'm a simple guy, I just like taking a seed, planting it, watch it grow, then harvest the produce to enjoy at the table after it matures. I think a little blessing every time I harvest, same as people have done for millions of years, just a little thought and thanks toward whomever or whatever provided me with this bounty. Amen, sermon done, plant and sow.
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Old 04-26-2012, 12:04 PM   #374
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We've got this demo running in our store:

http://plasmagrowlighting.net/Chamel...-_Product.html

So far...i'm impressed. My collegue (20 years exp + Penn St Master Gardner) - was less so when it arrived. But 4 days into it - he said he's seen massive improvements vs the fluorescent fixture in the tent we had.

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Old 05-11-2012, 10:38 AM   #375
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http://issuu.com/maximum-yield/docs/aus_july_aug_11/33

This issue of max yeild has some info on the role of fungi in your ecosystem for your plants.
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