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Old 12-27-2011, 07:52 AM   #301
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http://www.disinfo.com/2011/12/monsa...organ-failure/

Monsanto’s GM Corn Linked To Organ Failure

Posted by majestic on December 25, 2011

cornMake sure you have a GMO-free Christmas y’all! Katherine Goldstein and Gazelle Emami report on the consequences of genetic engineering of seeds by Monsanto, for Huffington Post:

In a study released by the International Journal of Biological Sciences, analyzing the effects of genetically modified foods on mammalian health, researchers found that agricultural giant Monsanto’s GM corn is linked to organ damage in rats.

According to the study, which was summarized by Rady Ananda at Food Freedom, “Three varieties of Monsanto’s GM corn – Mon 863, insecticide-producing Mon 810, and Roundup® herbicide-absorbing NK 603 – were approved for consumption by US, European and several other national food safety authorities.”

Monsanto gathered its own crude statistical data after conducting a 90-day study, even though chronic problems can rarely be found after 90 days, and concluded that the corn was safe for consumption. The stamp of approval may have been premature, however.

In the conclusion of the IJBS study, researchers wrote:

“Effects were mostly concentrated in kidney and liver function, the two major diet detoxification organs, but in detail differed with each GM type. In addition, some effects on heart, adrenal, spleen and blood cells were also frequently noted. As there normally exists sex differences in liver and kidney metabolism, the highly statistically significant disturbances in the function of these organs, seen between male and female rats, cannot be dismissed as biologically insignificant as has been proposed by others. We therefore conclude that our data strongly suggests that these GM maize varieties induce a state of hepatorenal toxicity….These substances have never before been an integral part of the human or animal diet and therefore their health consequences for those who consume them, especially over long time periods are currently unknown.”

Monsanto has immediately responded to the study, stating that the research is “based on faulty analytical methods and reasoning and do not call into question the safety findings for these products.”

[continues at Huffington Post]
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Old 12-27-2011, 07:53 AM   #302
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http://www.blacklistednews.com/Monsa...0/0/0/Y/M.html

Monsanto’s Roundup Ready Crops Leading to Mental Illness, Obesity

Monsanto’s Roundup Ready Crops Leading to Decreased Gut Flora

A formula seems to have been made to not only ruin the agricultural system, but also compromise the health of millions of people worldwide.

With the advent of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready crops, resistant superweeds are taking over farmland and public health is being attacked. These genetically engineered crops are created to withstand large amounts of Monsanto’s top-selling herbicide, Roundup. As it turns out, glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is actually leaving behind its residue on Roundup Ready crops, causing further potential concern for public health.

According to Dr. Don Huber, an expert in certain science fields relating to genetically modified foods, the amount of good bacteria in the gut decreases with the consumption of GMO foods. But this outcome is actually due to the residual glyphosate in animal feed and food.


Dr. Huber states that glyphosate residues in genetically engineered plants are responsible for a significant reduction in mineral content, causing people to be highly susceptible to pathogens.

Although studies have previously found that the beneficial bacteria in animals is destroyed thanks to glyphosate, a stronger connection will need to be made regarding human health for this kind of information to stick.

Poor Gut Flora Means Poor Health

As awareness grows, more and more people are realizing that poor gut flora often means poor health. Without the proper ratio of good bacteria to bad bacteria, overall health suffers and you could be left feeling depressed. In fact, poor gut health has been directly tied to mental illness,which may explain the influx of people being diagnosed with a mental illness. Not only that, butobesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome have all been tied to poor gut health.
..
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Old 02-01-2012, 05:54 AM   #303
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http://motherjones.com/tom-philpott/...ure-crossroads

Dow and Monsanto Team Up on the Mother of All Herbicide Marketing Plans
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:11 AM   #304
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My tomatos didn't do **** last year when I tried the "put them in big pots" theory championed by the local guy Felder Rushing. I guess I might try putting them in the ground again on the sunny side of my house, but there's a steep slope and I lose a lot of water. It'd freaking kill me to try and dig four foot deep, two feet across holes to bury the pots because of the roots.

I'm pretty much into just dusting once with seven and using manure .... my fake owls are hell on birds too.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:02 AM   #305
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going for my first tomato box this year.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:03 AM   #306
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I've got wheat grass & sprouts going

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Old 02-01-2012, 10:22 AM   #307
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Think i will try okra again this year since it was so successful last year. I hope its not so hot so I can do my thai peppers, ghost pepper and habanero again. Will try squash or zucchini and maybe some berries. Wish my garden was a bit bigger (8x8), i had a big problem last year with overcrowding.
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Old 02-01-2012, 11:33 AM   #308
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going for my first tomato box this year.
little cherry/grapes or something larger?

I do consistently have good success with grape toms, but again those did better in the ground than in pots because the pots just got hot. It was a brutal summer.
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:24 PM   #309
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Think i will try okra again this year since it was so successful last year. I hope its not so hot so I can do my thai peppers, ghost pepper and habanero again. Will try squash or zucchini and maybe some berries. Wish my garden was a bit bigger (8x8), i had a big problem last year with overcrowding.
I don't know about your yard and what you're doing - but can you go vertically with anything you're growing?

http://www.w9xt.com/page_garden_gadg...h_support.html




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Old 02-01-2012, 12:42 PM   #310
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I don't know about your yard and what you're doing - but can you go vertically with anything you're growing?

http://www.w9xt.com/page_garden_gadg...h_support.html



actually last year I was able to build a arbor like structure that hangs over my raised garden box. I was able to do some bitter squash and cucumber. The cucumber plant died when i went on vacation for the weekend because of the heat. I was thinking about expanding my garden, but the Texas clay is tough to remove and add topsoil.

I do have some trees that i take in during the winter months and out during the summer. I got a guava, tart kumquat, makok and kiffer lime (leaves are used for Thai hotpot). Guava hasn't produced any fruit yet. This year, I was thinking of picking up Granny Smith apple tree and another guava tree. Oh yeah, i got a double blossom peach tree.
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:42 PM   #311
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My tomatos didn't do **** last year when I tried the "put them in big pots" theory championed by the local guy Felder Rushing. I guess I might try putting them in the ground again on the sunny side of my house, but there's a steep slope and I lose a lot of water. It'd freaking kill me to try and dig four foot deep, two feet across holes to bury the pots because of the roots.

I'm pretty much into just dusting once with seven and using manure .... my fake owls are hell on birds too.
I set the record last year for the largest Tomato vines without any Tomato's. It's a talent I have.
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:44 PM   #312
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anybody here have any success with seedless water melons?
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:50 PM   #313
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actually last year I was able to build a arbor like structure that hangs over my raised garden box. I was able to do some bitter squash and cucumber. The cucumber plant died when i went on vacation for the weekend because of the heat. I was thinking about expanding my garden, but the Texas clay is tough to remove and add topsoil.

I do have some trees that i take in during the winter months and out during the summer. I got a guava, tart kumquat, makok and kiffer lime (leaves are used for Thai hotpot). Guava hasn't produced any fruit yet. This year, I was thinking of picking up Granny Smith apple tree and another guava tree. Oh yeah, i got a double blossom peach tree.
It's funny you mention that - the cold call list i'm working on - i actually found a bit of hydro shops in TX & FL. Never having been to either, i asked why so many shops in TX & FL:

"it's either sand, or dried up clay".

Then a gardener in FL sent me pics of his outdoor hydro system and i was impressed.

I helped some people go vertical with their Cukes & mellons - it worked out well for them.

I know you guys in TX have had a helluvatime with water lately...
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:57 PM   #314
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It's funny you mention that - the cold call list i'm working on - i actually found a bit of hydro shops in TX & FL. Never having been to either, i asked why so many shops in TX & FL:

"it's either sand, or dried up clay".

Then a gardener in FL sent me pics of his outdoor hydro system and i was impressed.

I helped some people go vertical with their Cukes & mellons - it worked out well for them.

I know you guys in TX have had a helluvatime with water lately...
i like going fishing and the lakes here are nearly exhausted. Boat ramps are closed and in some spots the shoreline retreated over 50 yards. yeah, I think the city i live in now is still in water restriction. I stopped watering my grass last year when the water restriction was put in place in the middle of summer.

I guess i was lucky because my garden is so small that i can get away with a light watering for about 5 minutes a day. I do want to expand and grow something more exotic, i just hope the heat isn't like it was last year.
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:11 PM   #315
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Originally Posted by SleepingTiger View Post
actually last year I was able to build a arbor like structure that hangs over my raised garden box. I was able to do some bitter squash and cucumber. The cucumber plant died when i went on vacation for the weekend because of the heat. I was thinking about expanding my garden, but the Texas clay is tough to remove and add topsoil.

I do have some trees that i take in during the winter months and out during the summer. I got a guava, tart kumquat, makok and kiffer lime (leaves are used for Thai hotpot). Guava hasn't produced any fruit yet. This year, I was thinking of picking up Granny Smith apple tree and another guava tree. Oh yeah, i got a double blossom peach tree.
Clay isn't bad growing soil, no big need to add topsoil. I tell people all the time just work in some mulch when you turn the soil over in spring, and throw in about 4 containers of worms and crawlers (amounts to about 10 dollars). I just use the dead grass I thatch from the lawn as the mulch along with the worms and crawlers.

The thatch feeds the worms and crawlers, the worms and crawlers break up the clay, and the waste the worms and crawlers produce is great fertilizer also. Voila, you've made good growing soil without going out buying bags of topsoil.
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:31 PM   #316
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I think preparation of the soil is where most gardeners fail. Lack of preparation actually. You have to bust up the soil eight inches deep every spring prior to seeding or planting seedlings, loosen the soil and get the nutrients in, get it prepared for your plants so they can set their roots fast and deep. You don't need anything fancy.
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Old 02-02-2012, 05:19 AM   #317
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I think preparation of the soil is where most gardeners fail. Lack of preparation actually. You have to bust up the soil eight inches deep every spring prior to seeding or planting seedlings, loosen the soil and get the nutrients in, get it prepared for your plants so they can set their roots fast and deep. You don't need anything fancy.
Nope, and your advice is pretty much "it". You can do things differently, but the core concepts are as simple as that.

Right now, I live in the Mid-Atlantic. Where I live - there's areas that have tons of clay. Just work it in. Each year your plot gets better & better.


Do any of you guys use/make compost teas?

I've been learning about it, pretty cool.
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:19 AM   #318
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I think preparation of the soil is where most gardeners fail. Lack of preparation actually. You have to bust up the soil eight inches deep every spring prior to seeding or planting seedlings, loosen the soil and get the nutrients in, get it prepared for your plants so they can set their roots fast and deep. You don't need anything fancy.
thanks for the tip. you said use your grass clippings, aren't you worried about grass growing in your garden? I have a very tough time keeping the grass out of my garden already.The clay in my yard is extremely compact. I have a tiller and it can't break down the clay. It actually breaks up the clay into chunks. That is the reason I have a raised garden bed because I can't loosen the soil 8" deep. I will need a very heavy duty tiller. The one I have is $200 from home depot and it struggles after about 1" then it just bounces up and down.
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Old 02-02-2012, 12:00 PM   #319
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I made a compost tea with egg shells and coffee grounds for my old tomato patch, where I had good success until the neighbors' trees choked out sun in my back yard. I think I could grow some green leafy stuff like greens back there
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Old 02-02-2012, 12:14 PM   #320
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Yep worms will over a few years turn gunky clay into some fine soil but they will migrate to better soil if it is around.

They will do wonders for a lawn also they love coffee grounds if you can work that into your soil great.. They also fix up sandy soil also..night crawlers can screw up a lawn with their burrows makes it lumpy try only straight earth worms if you can..

Grass clippings as long as they are not seeded will not grow grass in your beds..

You should never take/cut more than a third of the grass leaf anyway if you have to cut it a couple of times to get it short enough that works also.

Keep your mower blades sharp especially if it is a rotary mower, the reel types are the best, as they clip like scissors, and will not beat your grass apart (dull blades) and having frayed ends which make the grass look yellow after a cut..
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Old 02-02-2012, 12:16 PM   #321
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let me add I have not had good luck with worms in Texas as we get infestations of June bugs which come from bugs that eat the roots of the grass so wind upi spraying to kill those and unfortunately the worms..

If anyone has a solution let me know..
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Old 02-02-2012, 12:57 PM   #322
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Probably why Hydroponics is big in TX.
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Old 02-02-2012, 01:22 PM   #323
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SleepingTiger View Post
thanks for the tip. you said use your grass clippings, aren't you worried about grass growing in your garden? I have a very tough time keeping the grass out of my garden already.The clay in my yard is extremely compact. I have a tiller and it can't break down the clay. It actually breaks up the clay into chunks. That is the reason I have a raised garden bed because I can't loosen the soil 8" deep. I will need a very heavy duty tiller. The one I have is $200 from home depot and it struggles after about 1" then it just bounces up and down.
Not the clippings, just the dead grass I thatch out of the lawn in March with my thatch rake.

Maybe your situation is hopeless because the clay is impossible to bust up deep, I'm not trying to preach like I know your situation.

I use a garden fork to turn the soil over. I know clay is hard and it takes a while the first time you try to bust up that virgin clay. It's about a four-five round bout trying to bust up virgin clay.

You have to drive that fork in like an aerator the first round of the bout, even if you can only get it in a couple inches. Soak the clay good first of course, and then soak it again after you've created holes in it with the garden fork. Then start again in round two of the bout and bust the clay up a little more. You can start trying to work in some thatch/mulch in this round, maybe some fish meal pellets. Of course soak it again, then start on the next round of the bout.

The clay will be in big chunks once you start making headway, but then you soak it again and start the next round of the bout driving that fork into the chunks and work your thatch/mulch in some more.

It's a battle, I've been through it. Takes time, water, sweat, but clay is not bad soil to grow in once you've busted it up. There can still be many chunks 2-3 inches in diameter that first year, you'll still get a yield. The worms and crawlers will keep the clay you already busted up loose and aerated. The mulch/thatch will give them plenty of food.
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Old 02-02-2012, 01:38 PM   #324
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Yep worms will over a few years turn gunky clay into some fine soil but they will migrate to better soil if it is around.

They will do wonders for a lawn also they love coffee grounds if you can work that into your soil great.. They also fix up sandy soil also..night crawlers can screw up a lawn with their burrows makes it lumpy try only straight earth worms if you can..

Grass clippings as long as they are not seeded will not grow grass in your beds..

You should never take/cut more than a third of the grass leaf anyway if you have to cut it a couple of times to get it short enough that works also.

Keep your mower blades sharp especially if it is a rotary mower, the reel types are the best, as they clip like scissors, and will not beat your grass apart (dull blades) and having frayed ends which make the grass look yellow after a cut..
I keep the worms and crawlers in the garden by working in plenty of nutrients in the form of the grass thatch when I fork the garden over in spring. Mulch from the kitchen waste is great also. They stay right at home. And then once the crops take hold they feed on some of the roots also.

Those crawlers sure do make a lawn lumpy, but they're great for a garden.
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Old 02-02-2012, 01:42 PM   #325
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let me add I have not had good luck with worms in Texas as we get infestations of June bugs which come from bugs that eat the roots of the grass so wind upi spraying to kill those and unfortunately the worms..

If anyone has a solution let me know..
Chickens and garter snakes? Heh-heh.
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