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Old 09-12-2011, 01:21 PM   #276
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It's called 'produce' for a reason.

It's not like it's a lot of work, the reap is well worth the work put in. I guess some people just don't like getting their hands dirty, dealing with the insects, pulling weeds. I love produce gardening myself, it's rewarding year after year after year, unlike some other endeavours that are swing and a miss like the stock market and the Broncos.
We have had a nasty time of weather out here. Lots of rain - so we've had some problems with some of the later tomatoes "busting" due to water (live/learn) - but overall - we did well.

We used mantis', diatomacious earth, & neem oil and kept the ants at bay.

overall - was a really productive year though.


there's a possibility I might be doing this for a "living".
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:00 PM   #277
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Eh, be careful if that's your living. Sounds like you have an undertanding of the vagaries. There's a lot of things that can pop up. My family came out of Nebraska farmers and it can be brutal some years. You gotta have some cash stashed away for the bad years.
Well, there's a larger picture i'm not sharing, due to things being in the planning process. it's an understood concern by partners and I.

Part of my family are/were farmers in IA.

I just see this opportunity and am excited about being able to plan a "sustainable" project between us*. Sustainability isn't just food, but a concept from top/bottom for how we are looking at this new business.
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Old 09-16-2011, 02:20 PM   #278
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Well, my garden is about tapped out for this season. Still might be able eke out some more squash, beans, cukes, but not much. Maybe one more week, just not getting enough sun, they start to toughen if they're not getting sun.

Had a good year. It boomed in August with the hot dry weather. Ah well, there's always next season, and the onions that are left over will survive the winter and boom in spring. Now is a good time to start carrots and some more onions.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:10 AM   #279
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http://www.blacklistednews.com/WI%3A...0/0/0/Y/M.html

WI: No Right to Produce or Eat Food

The original judgement can be seen here. To quote from the main points:

1) no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to own and use a dairy cow or a dairy herd;

2) no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to consume the milk from their own cow;

3) no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to board their cow at the farm of a farmer;

4) no, the Zinniker Plaintiffs’ private contract does not fall outside the scope of the State’s police power;

5) no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to produce and consume foods of their choice;
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:29 AM   #280
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I had my typical yield this year for squash, beans, radish, cukes, lettuce, onions. Sure is nice to put a little work in (which I actually like), spend twenty dollars for seed, spend ten dollars for worms, and reap $200 of produce. Not to mention how much goodwill I get from my neighbors when I give them the excess fresh harvest.
do you water your own garden or just wait for rain?
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:39 AM   #281
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Well, my garden is about tapped out for this season. Still might be able eke out some more squash, beans, cukes, but not much. Maybe one more week, just not getting enough sun, they start to toughen if they're not getting sun.

Had a good year. It boomed in August with the hot dry weather. Ah well, there's always next season, and the onions that are left over will survive the winter and boom in spring. Now is a good time to start carrots and some more onions.
This year I tried new stuff like, okra, bitter melon, cucumber, mints, rosemary, basil, strawberries, thai peppers, habanero, bhut jolokia, trinidad scorpion peppers. Because of the heat, i had to water my garden everyday.

Went on a 3 day vacation and my cucumber plant died even after the stalk had grown to nearly 1.5 inches. 3 days of no water and nearly my entire garden died.

Okra, thai peppers, spice plants was producing everyday.

Bitter melons would wilt before they are big enough to harvest. Now that the weather is cooler, i am finally seeing some results

stawberries just didn't produce anything.

my other pepper plants are just now blooming because the temperature is finally dropping. can't wait to try out the worlds 2 hottest peppers!
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Old 10-31-2011, 07:58 AM   #282
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http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/g...ain+%28Main%29



General Store: A Gem of a Greenhouse
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Old 11-02-2011, 08:46 AM   #283
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http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boing...ial-wheat.html

This is not the best photo, but it is pretty damn mind-blowing. What you see here is Jerry Glover, National Geographic Emerging Explorer, holding the root system of a single perennial wheat plant. The photo was taken by Scientific American editor Mariette DiChristina at the Compass Summit in Palos Verdes, California.

There's more to this than just a freaky looking plant dreadlock. That root system represents something far bigger than itself: Soil health. Perennial plants build soil and protect against erosion in ways annual plants and their skimpy root structures simply cannot. It's why, since large-scale corn farming replaced perennial prairie, Iowa has lost some 8 vertical inches of precious topsoil. Glover's argument: To protect our farming resources for future generations we need to pay more attention to the potential benefits of perennial crops.

***Pics & embedded links @ source.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:20 AM   #284
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This year I tried new stuff like, okra, bitter melon, cucumber, mints, rosemary, basil, strawberries, thai peppers, habanero, bhut jolokia, trinidad scorpion peppers. Because of the heat, i had to water my garden everyday.

Went on a 3 day vacation and my cucumber plant died even after the stalk had grown to nearly 1.5 inches. 3 days of no water and nearly my entire garden died.

Okra, thai peppers, spice plants was producing everyday.

Bitter melons would wilt before they are big enough to harvest. Now that the weather is cooler, i am finally seeing some results

stawberries just didn't produce anything.

my other pepper plants are just now blooming because the temperature is finally dropping. can't wait to try out the worlds 2 hottest peppers!
Sounds like a nice garden. Yeah, going three days without water can be a killer in the Southwest.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:32 AM   #285
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http://www.disinfo.com/2011/11/fda-a...nuclear-waste/

FDA Allows Meat and Produce To Be Blasted with Radioactive Nuclear Waste

Ethan A. Huff writes on Natural News:

The use of pesticides and the presence of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are not the only major differentiating factors between conventional food and organic food. According to GreenMedInfo.com, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows the conventional food supply to be irradiated with nuclear waste at extremely high levels, and also treated with deadly bacteriophage virus “cocktails” in order to make it “safe” for consumers.

It is a dirty little secret of the factory food industry, and one that has remained largely veiled thanks to a lack of effective regulation concerning proper labeling. But everything from herbs and spices to vegetables and fruit is effectively murdered with Cobalt-60 gamma radiation derived from the waste of nuclear reactors before being sold to customers.

According to data listed on the FDA’s own website, fresh conventional foods are typically blasted with 1 kilogray (kGy) of gamma radiation, which is the equivalent of 16,700,000 chest X-rays, or 333 times the human lethal dose. Fresh poultry and red meat are subjected to 3 kGys and 4.5 kGys, respectively, with frozen red meat subjected to radiation blasts as high as 7 kGys.

The FDA has approved gamma radiation doses of 10 kGys for enzyme preparations, which include various food additives, solvents, preservatives, and antioxidants. And spices, herbs, and seasonings are permitted to be blasted with an astounding 30 kGys of gamma radiation, which is the equivalent of 500,000,000 chest X-rays, or 10,000 times the human lethal dose.

Read More: Natural News
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:54 AM   #286
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http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/g...ain+%28Main%29



General Store: A Gem of a Greenhouse
that is damn cool....
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:04 AM   #287
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that is damn cool....
Yep, up/re cycle and you can at least get "started on the cheap".
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:27 AM   #288
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Yep, up/re cycle and you can at least get "started on the cheap".
I plan to do something small when we redo our backyard next spring. I know good spot right next to the compost tumbler.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:14 AM   #289
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I plan to do something small when we redo our backyard next spring. I know good spot right next to the compost tumbler.
Very cool! Do you make your own "teas", what sort of methods do you use for feed?
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:19 AM   #290
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Very cool! Do you make your own "teas", what sort of methods do you use for feed?
I use the ones from Nature Technologies....
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:01 PM   #291
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I use the ones from Nature Technologies....
You ever think of making your own?
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:32 PM   #292
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You ever think of making your own?
no, is it hard? Do you make yours?
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:46 PM   #293
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no, is it hard? Do you make yours?
it's not as hard as what you'd think!

Google/Search "how to make compost teas" - there are some basics -

Really - some panty hose, guano - a bucket, water, & airstone (you need the water to be active so bad bacteria don't breed - this is critical!)

We do it @ the gardenshop for all our own plants.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:49 PM   #294
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it's not as hard as what you'd think!

Google/Search "how to make compost teas" - there are some basics -

Really - some panty hose, guano - a bucket, water, & airstone (you need the water to be active so bad bacteria don't breed - this is critical!)

We do it @ the gardenshop for all our own plants.
I'll have to try it. Thanks!
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:58 PM   #295
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I heard vinegar works with keeping dogs off grass?

is this true, any other tips? Im trying keep my sod from being destroyed before it takes
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Old 11-22-2011, 02:02 PM   #296
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I heard vinegar works with keeping dogs off grass?

is this true, any other tips? Im trying keep my sod from being destroyed before it takes
your dogs or someone else's? If they're your dogs, you can buy Dog Rocks to put in their water....no more spots.
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Old 12-02-2011, 08:30 AM   #297
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http://www.disinfo.com/2011/12/the-j...ain-of-plants/

The Joy And Pain Of Plants

Posted by JacobSloan on December 1, 2011

plants The Smart Set looks at the fascinating work of Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose, a pioneering scientist who believed that plants can feel excitement and pain, tremor in fear, react to soothing and harsh treatment, and communicate, just as we do:

In a room near Maida Vale, a journalist for The Nation wrote around 1914, an unfortunate creature is strapped to the table of an unlicensed vivisector. When the subject is pinched with a pair of forceps, it winces. It is so strapped that its electric shudder of pain pulls the long arm of a very delicate lever that actuates a tiny mirror. This casts a beam of light on the frieze at the other end of the room, and thus enormously exaggerates the tremor of the creature. “Thus,” the journalist concluded, “can science reveal the feelings of even so stolid a vegetable as the carrot.”

Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose, the aforementioned carrot vivisector, was a serious man of science. Born in what is today Bangladesh in 1858, Bose was a quintessential polymath: physicist, biologist, botanist, archaeologist. He was the first person from the Indian subcontinent to receive a U.S. patent, and is considered one of the fathers of radio science, alongside such notables as Tesla, Marconi, and Popov. And, like many scientists of weight, he has become popularly known for his more controversial pursuits — in Bose’s case, his experiments in plant physiology.

Perhaps it was his work in radio waves and electricity that inspired Bose’s investigations into what we might call the invisible world. Bose strongly felt that physics could go far beyond what was apparent to the naked eye. Around 1900, Bose began his investigations into the secret world of plants. He found that all plants, and all parts of plants, have a sensitive nervous system not unlike that of animals, and that their responses to external stimuli could be measured and recorded. Some plant reactions can be seen easily in sensitive plants like the Mimosa, which, when irritated, will react with the sudden shedding or shrinking of its leaves. But when Bose attached his magnifying device to plants from which it was more difficult to witness a response, such as vegetables, he was astounded to discover that they, too, became excited when vexed. All around us, Bose realized, the plants are communicating. We just don’t notice it.

The more responses Bose got from his plants, the more encouraged he became, and the more detailed his efforts became. Bose discovered that an electric death spasm occurs in plants when they die, and that the actual moment of death in a plant could be accurately recorded. As Sir Patrick Geddes described in his 1920 biography of Bose, the electromotive force generated during the death spasm is sometimes considerable. Bose calculated that a half-pea, for instance, could discharge up to half a volt. Thus, if 500 pairs of boiling half-peas were arranged in series, the electric pressure would be 500 volts, enough to electrocute unsuspecting victims. The average cook does not know the danger she runs in preparing peas, Bose wrote. “It is fortunate for her that the peas are not arranged in series!”

Bose was determined to show other serious scientists not only the wonders of plant perception but “the marvelous resemblance there is between the reactions of plants and animals.” His 1902 paper “Responses in the Living and Non-Living” contains a whole chapter comparing the electrical impulse response of frog, lizard, and tortoise skins to the skins of tomatoes and grapes. He found little difference. Bose would write that plants grew more quickly when exposed to nice music and gentle whispers, and poorly when exposed to harsh music and loud speech. Over years of research, Bose found that plants were visibly reactive to all manner of stimuli: flashes of light, changes in temperature, plucking, pricking, screaming. Plants became numbed by drugs and drunk from alcohol.

Bose is long dead, but plant physiology has become a well-respected scientific pursuit. There are now plenty of scientists who, over the decades, have given further weight to Bose’s theories that plants may not be as different from animals as previously thought. Elizabeth Haswell, assistant professor of biology at Washington University in Saint Louis, along with colleagues at the California Institute of Technology, recently wrote a review article about mechanosensitive channels in plants for the journal Structure. The article was called “Mechanosensitive Channels: What Can They Do and How Do They Do It?” In it, Haswell writes about how she has been experimenting on Arabidopsis plants to understand plants’ responses to gravity, and touch, and us. This fact alone is, admittedly, of little interest to the average person. But one wonders why Haswell’s rather scholarly article got picked up by press around the world. Why, in March of this year, The New York Times published a piece called “No Face, but Plants Like Life Too?” Why a big science news story last year was a BBC News report titled “Plants can think and remember.” Why, nearly 100 years since the publication of Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose’s “Researches on irritability of plants,” plant physiology is news.

Plants respond to environmental factors. We’ve known this for a very long time. They will turn toward or away from the sun; they will sway with a passing breeze. But more and more, science has been telling us that the awareness goes much deeper, that plants have a kind of sentience. Does that mean they have consciousness? If they have consciousness, can they suffer? And if they suffer, and we are sometimes causing their suffering, do we want to stop? Can we? “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” — it’s our Golden Rule. As Bose showed, plantss reactions to unpleasant stimuli is very similar to our own. If we can call this pain, as Bose does, how can we accept the harm we cause when snipping a flower off a bush simply for decoration, or rolling around in the grass to play? Should we start eating only food that we can pluck from a tree without damaging the tree itself, or better still, that falls off the tree of its own accord? Food that is already dead?

Plants respond to environmental factors. We’ve known this for a very long time. They will turn toward or away from the sun; they will sway with a passing breeze. But more and more, science has been telling us that the awareness goes much deeper, that plants have a kind of sentience. Does that mean they have consciousness? If they have consciousness, can they suffer? And if they suffer, and we are sometimes causing their suffering, do we want to stop? Can we? “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” — it’s our Golden Rule. As Bose showed, plantss reactions to unpleasant stimuli is very similar to our own. If we can call this pain, as Bose does, how can we accept the harm we cause when snipping a flower off a bush simply for decoration, or rolling around in the grass to play? Should we start eating only food that we can pluck from a tree without damaging the tree itself, or better still, that falls off the tree of its own accord? Food that is already dead?

It’s easy to accept that an animal is happy when we are nice to it. It’s less easy, though not impossible, to accept that a plant grows measurably better when we are nice to it. Harder to take seriously is the idea that grass feels pained by our walking feet. Harder still, the idea of a sad rock. The further things get away from their likeness to humanity, the more difficult it is to empathize with them, and therefore to feel that we should care.

But before we dismiss Bose as completely crackers, it’s important to understand the true implication of his work and that of Haswell, et al. Bose’s message isn’t that our care for the world must be based on the assumption that all things have a fundamental humanness. It is that existence and awareness are deeply connected, and that dismissing the fundamental unity of matter is dismissing a fundamental truth about life. Most of us will still keep eating our veggies in good faith. But will we ever approach our salad in exactly the same way again? Or, for that matter, our fork?
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:39 AM   #298
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http://www.realitysandwich.com/urban...n_growing_food

Converting Urban and Suburban Lands for Growing Food
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:30 PM   #299
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http://webecoist.momtastic.com/2011/...t-city-living/

Honey I’m Home! Urban Beehives For Sweet City Living
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:31 PM   #300
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Elway and Fox are sabotaging my garden
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