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Old 07-17-2013, 04:55 PM   #1151
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I bought the hard copy a couple of years ago due to the awesome cover art, but I just started reading it after hearing about the TV series version airing on CBS. As usual with King, it could have used an editor, but it's an interesting read with well-rounded (if at times a bit hokey) characters. I'm looking forward to catching up on the series, which from what I've read is quite a bit different from the book. A major part of the plot deals with a meth-dealing town leader, which I've heard they've changed for the series due to similarities with Breaking Bad. Can anyone confirm this?
No, there still seems to be a meth-dealing town leader (they haven't come out and said it, yet - although I haven't seen the most recent episode).

The series is not great. But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:55 PM   #1152
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Not to be missed, MHG

The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism [Paperback]

Paul Craig Roberts (Author)

Book Description
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Former Wall Street Journal editor, and Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury Paul Craig Roberts book is a major challenge both to economic theory and to media explanations of the ongoing 21st century economic crisis. The one percent have pulled off an economic and political revolution. By offshoring manufacturing and professional service jobs, US corporations destroyed the growth of consumer income, the basis of the US economy, leaving the bulk of the population mired in debt. Deregulation was used to concentrate income and wealth in fewer hands and financial firms in corporations "too big to fail,” removing financial corporations from market discipline and forcing taxpayers in the US and Europe to cover bankster losses. Environmental destruction has accelerated as economists refuse to count the exhaustion of nature's resources as a cost and as corporations impose the cost of their activities on the environment and on third parties who do not share in the profits. This is the book to read for those who want to understand the mistakes that are bringing the West to its knees.

5.0 out of 5 stars A REVIEW

Collapse Overtakes The West July 1, 2013
By Johannes Maruschzik


The Failure Of Laissez Faire Capitalism And Economic Dissolution Of The West by Dr. Paul Craig Roberts - formerly Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury for Economic Policy - is a fundamentally important work about the dramatic changes that are taking place in the US and world economies. For this reason, I translated the book into German in the spring of 2012 for its publication under the title "Wirtschaft am Abgrund" by Weltbuch Verlag (Dresden) in July 2012. Economic and political developments during the past year have given the book even greater significance.

Roberts describes the social, political, and economic dispossession that is occurring throughout the West. The citizens in the Western democracies are being forced into acceptance of the agenda of a small oligarchy of powerful private interests. The "free" media, "democratic" governments, and most economists serve the ruling private interests. Let's face it: Private power can be just as abusive as public power. The worst-case scenario is when both are working hand in hand, what, in fact, is happening in the Western democracies today.

Economic theory based on "empty world" economics cannot deal with the problems of a "full world" economy. A mistaken understanding of free trade has blinded the West to its economic erosion by jobs offshoring--labor arbitrage that substitutes lower paid foreign labor for the higher wages in developed countries, with the result that Western economies are deprived of employment opportunities, tax base, and real GDP growth.

Contrary to government claims and media reports, the U.S. economy is still in a recession. A real recovery is not in sight. The recovery exists only in the official measure of real GDP, which is deflated by an understated measure of inflation, and in the U.3 measure of the unemployment rate, which is declining because it does not count discouraged job seekers who have given up looking for a job. No other data series indicates an economic recovery. Neither real retail sales nor housing starts, consumer confidence, payroll employment, or average weekly earnings indicate economic recovery. Consumer real income in the US is stagnant or falling, and consumers are too indebted to be able to take on yet more debt with which to finance their spending. In the absence of growing consumer demand, an economy dependent on consumer demand cannot advance.

The ongoing debt monetization in the amount of one trillion U.S. dollars annually by the Federal Reserve threatens the dollar's role as world reserve currency. The real estate and derivative bubbles that produced the financial crisis have been replaced by bond, stock, and currency bubbles.

In Europe the "sovereign debt crisis" is being used to subvert democracy and the independence of the individual member countries that constitute the European Union. The common currency is being used to centralize the budget policies of the separate countries, thus stripping them of their sovereignty. Governments of heavily indebted members of the EU, such as Greece, are being forced to extract resources from their hard-pressed populations in order to ensure that the private banks that over lent to governments suffer no losses.

Formerly, the policy was for banks to write down sovereign debt that cannot be paid; today the policy is to extract the resources from the population by cutting wages, pensions, social services, and selling the country's public assets to private interests. To stabilize the situation, German income will be tapped to provide transfer payments to alleviate the suffering of the Greek population that is being looted for the sake of the profits of private banks.

Roberts makes it clear that we are experiencing a turning point in history as Western peoples are being enserfed.

The economies of the US, UK, and EU are in a process of dissolution. For a decade, Roberts has been warning against the fatal consequences of the erosion of goods producing industries in the United States. Offshoring - the relocation of production of goods for domestic markets to low-wage countries in order to profit from labor arbitrage between different wage levels in different countries - has already destroyed millions of middle class jobs in the United States. The ladders of upward mobility in the American "Opportunity Society" have been dismantled by "globalization."

The centralization of power in the US in the hands of an increasingly unaccountable executive branch is matched in the EU by the increasingly dirigistic policies of EU politicians.

Roberts warns the Germans not to terminate their sovereignty by agreeing to turn their governance over to a central government in Brussels. Instead, Germany should resign from the EU, re-establish the D-Mark, and enter an economic alliance with resource-rich Russia. Such a cooperation, in which the states would keep their economic sovereignty and separate currencies, would create an economic bloc consisting of Germany, Russia, Eastern and Central Europe and would eventually draw in Western Europe. This development would break up NATO, an organization whose purpose ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today NATO functions as a military auxiliary to Washington's drive for hegemony, thus enabling the numerous wars and military operations that Washington has launched in the 21st century.

If you want to understand what really is happening, read this book. No clearer or more accurate account exists.
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Old 07-17-2013, 06:17 PM   #1153
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The World House by Guy Adams..."
In some rooms, forests grow. In others, animals and objects come to life. Elsewhere, secrets and treasures wait for the brave and foolhardy.
And at the very top of the house, a prisoner sits behind a locked door waiting for a key to turn. The day that happens, the world will end…"


I found it at a library book sale and I don't think I've read a book as original as this in ages.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:38 AM   #1154
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But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.
Even The Mist? Sure Darabont took a lot of liberties, but that ending was one of the most emotionally jarring things I've ever watched.
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Old 07-18-2013, 05:03 AM   #1155
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I stopped reading books when the internet was invented. Everything I want to know is on the internet. My god what is Miley Cyrus up to today I wonder?!?!?!?!?
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:58 AM   #1156
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No, there still seems to be a meth-dealing town leader (they haven't come out and said it, yet - although I haven't seen the most recent episode).
Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.

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The series is not great. But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.
Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:45 AM   #1157
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Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.



Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.
The plot for Dolores Claiborne was twisted around a bit in the movie, but I thought it captured the essence of his great book also. I wouldn't call it superior though I suppose.
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:11 AM   #1158
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Not to be missed, MHG

The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism [Paperback]

Paul Craig Roberts (Author)

Book Description
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Former Wall Street Journal editor, and Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury Paul Craig Roberts book is a major challenge both to economic theory and to media explanations of the ongoing 21st century economic crisis. The one percent have pulled off an economic and political revolution. By offshoring manufacturing and professional service jobs, US corporations destroyed the growth of consumer income, the basis of the US economy, leaving the bulk of the population mired in debt. Deregulation was used to concentrate income and wealth in fewer hands and financial firms in corporations "too big to fail,” removing financial corporations from market discipline and forcing taxpayers in the US and Europe to cover bankster losses. Environmental destruction has accelerated as economists refuse to count the exhaustion of nature's resources as a cost and as corporations impose the cost of their activities on the environment and on third parties who do not share in the profits. This is the book to read for those who want to understand the mistakes that are bringing the West to its knees.

5.0 out of 5 stars A REVIEW

Collapse Overtakes The West July 1, 2013
By Johannes Maruschzik


The Failure Of Laissez Faire Capitalism And Economic Dissolution Of The West by Dr. Paul Craig Roberts - formerly Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury for Economic Policy - is a fundamentally important work about the dramatic changes that are taking place in the US and world economies. For this reason, I translated the book into German in the spring of 2012 for its publication under the title "Wirtschaft am Abgrund" by Weltbuch Verlag (Dresden) in July 2012. Economic and political developments during the past year have given the book even greater significance.

Roberts describes the social, political, and economic dispossession that is occurring throughout the West. The citizens in the Western democracies are being forced into acceptance of the agenda of a small oligarchy of powerful private interests. The "free" media, "democratic" governments, and most economists serve the ruling private interests. Let's face it: Private power can be just as abusive as public power. The worst-case scenario is when both are working hand in hand, what, in fact, is happening in the Western democracies today.

Economic theory based on "empty world" economics cannot deal with the problems of a "full world" economy. A mistaken understanding of free trade has blinded the West to its economic erosion by jobs offshoring--labor arbitrage that substitutes lower paid foreign labor for the higher wages in developed countries, with the result that Western economies are deprived of employment opportunities, tax base, and real GDP growth.

Contrary to government claims and media reports, the U.S. economy is still in a recession. A real recovery is not in sight. The recovery exists only in the official measure of real GDP, which is deflated by an understated measure of inflation, and in the U.3 measure of the unemployment rate, which is declining because it does not count discouraged job seekers who have given up looking for a job. No other data series indicates an economic recovery. Neither real retail sales nor housing starts, consumer confidence, payroll employment, or average weekly earnings indicate economic recovery. Consumer real income in the US is stagnant or falling, and consumers are too indebted to be able to take on yet more debt with which to finance their spending. In the absence of growing consumer demand, an economy dependent on consumer demand cannot advance.

The ongoing debt monetization in the amount of one trillion U.S. dollars annually by the Federal Reserve threatens the dollar's role as world reserve currency. The real estate and derivative bubbles that produced the financial crisis have been replaced by bond, stock, and currency bubbles.

In Europe the "sovereign debt crisis" is being used to subvert democracy and the independence of the individual member countries that constitute the European Union. The common currency is being used to centralize the budget policies of the separate countries, thus stripping them of their sovereignty. Governments of heavily indebted members of the EU, such as Greece, are being forced to extract resources from their hard-pressed populations in order to ensure that the private banks that over lent to governments suffer no losses.

Formerly, the policy was for banks to write down sovereign debt that cannot be paid; today the policy is to extract the resources from the population by cutting wages, pensions, social services, and selling the country's public assets to private interests. To stabilize the situation, German income will be tapped to provide transfer payments to alleviate the suffering of the Greek population that is being looted for the sake of the profits of private banks.

Roberts makes it clear that we are experiencing a turning point in history as Western peoples are being enserfed.

The economies of the US, UK, and EU are in a process of dissolution. For a decade, Roberts has been warning against the fatal consequences of the erosion of goods producing industries in the United States. Offshoring - the relocation of production of goods for domestic markets to low-wage countries in order to profit from labor arbitrage between different wage levels in different countries - has already destroyed millions of middle class jobs in the United States. The ladders of upward mobility in the American "Opportunity Society" have been dismantled by "globalization."

The centralization of power in the US in the hands of an increasingly unaccountable executive branch is matched in the EU by the increasingly dirigistic policies of EU politicians.

Roberts warns the Germans not to terminate their sovereignty by agreeing to turn their governance over to a central government in Brussels. Instead, Germany should resign from the EU, re-establish the D-Mark, and enter an economic alliance with resource-rich Russia. Such a cooperation, in which the states would keep their economic sovereignty and separate currencies, would create an economic bloc consisting of Germany, Russia, Eastern and Central Europe and would eventually draw in Western Europe. This development would break up NATO, an organization whose purpose ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today NATO functions as a military auxiliary to Washington's drive for hegemony, thus enabling the numerous wars and military operations that Washington has launched in the 21st century.

If you want to understand what really is happening, read this book. No clearer or more accurate account exists.
I thought we were talking about reading Novels ?
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:14 AM   #1159
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Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.
Just wait to see if The Dark Tower ever gets made. His masterpiece could be destroyed on the big screen. But otherwise I agree with that list but I personally was a huge fan of the novel's ending of The Mist but Thomas Jane did do a heck of a job.
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:33 AM   #1160
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Does anyone listen to audio books? I never did until a couple of months ago. It's great! 30 min commute to work each way plus 1 hour in the gym plus time mowing the grass, jogging ect. It adds up pretty quick. Especially if you listen at 1.2 or 1.3 speed. I prefer to read when I can but reading plus audio book and I usually finish a book about 5 times as fast.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:51 AM   #1161
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I did for Harry potter 5,6 and 1 of the game of thrones books. Yep it's nice to listen to the books on the way to work and back. I also would listen while playing games.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:01 PM   #1162
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I do audiobooks for long trips. The last one I did was The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.

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Old 07-18-2013, 12:26 PM   #1163
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Does anyone listen to audio books? I never did until a couple of months ago. It's great! 30 min commute to work each way plus 1 hour in the gym plus time mowing the grass, jogging ect. It adds up pretty quick. Especially if you listen at 1.2 or 1.3 speed. I prefer to read when I can but reading plus audio book and I usually finish a book about 5 times as fast.
I love to listen to audiobooks. I like to have both, the book and audio book, to keep it going while driving and not driving.
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Old 07-18-2013, 03:42 PM   #1164
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Just wait to see if The Dark Tower ever gets made. His masterpiece could be destroyed on the big screen. But otherwise I agree with that list but I personally was a huge fan of the novel's ending of The Mist but Thomas Jane did do a heck of a job.
It will probably get made eventually. But there is no way to do it justice, unless they did it as multiple movies. Instead, they'll probably do it as a crappy miniseries.
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Old 07-18-2013, 03:59 PM   #1165
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I still love that movie, even if the end is lame. We had just moved to Florida when it came out and I was about 12 or 13 and since there were no kids in our neighborhood my mom would let me and my 10 year old sister ride our bikes a couple miles to a small mall that had a theater. My sister and I watched that movie a bunch of times.

I don't remember the book being as memorable as 2001, Blade Runner (though that is classic Sci-Fi at it's best), Alien, or even Outland, it is pretty thin. Maybe I will crack it open again and give it a read, soccer practice has started up and I have time to read.
2001 A Space Odyssey is based on a book by one of my all time favorite writers, Arthur C. Clarke, and the book is fantastic. I never really understood the movie until I read the book and then it all come together. Fantastic move by Stanely Kubrik based on a fantastic book by Arthur C. Clarke. Win win.

Blade Runner is on one of the rare exceptions where the movie is far, far superior to the book. The book is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?:



Don't bother reading it, it sucks.

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Old 07-18-2013, 04:31 PM   #1166
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Blade Runner is on one of the rare exceptions where the movie is far, far superior to the book. The book is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?:



Don't bother reading it, it sucks.
False. It's one of the best books ever. Better than the movie.

But it's a bit different, so if one reads the book on the basis of how well it translates the movie, then fail will happen.
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Old 07-18-2013, 04:33 PM   #1167
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Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.



Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.
The three that I thought were good were The Shining, Shawshank, and Stand By Me. The interesting thing about those three is that none of them are really typical King stories. (The Shining might be an exception. But I would argue that if it's more of a ghost story than it is a horror story.)

It's been a long time since I last saw The Mist. I'll have to reserve judgement on that one, until I can watch it again. The Green Mile was, I thought, a great movie. I just didn't think it was a great adaptation of the book (if you could even call The Green Mile a "book").

On the other hand, there have been some adaptations that were just embarrassing.

There are a few things that generally keep me from liking Stephen King movie adaptations. First, I don't particularly like horror films. There have been a few exceptions, over the years; but I generally avoid them. For whatever reason, for me personally, I can read about something implausible (and let's face it - most of what you read in a Stephen King novel is pretty much implausible), and avoid getting hung up on its implausibility. When I see the same scene acted out on the screen, I usually end up thinking, "Oh, that was really awful!"

But more than that, I think there is an element to most Stephen King stories that just can't be quantified in the two-hour time frame generally allotted in a movie. This is where I get some eye-rolling when I'm talking to people who don't, say, "appreciate" Stephen King as much as I. There is a depth and intelligence to his writing that I don't see in most contemporary writers. The directors of his film adaptations seem to go after the low-hanging fruit of the stories - that is, the gore and creepy aspects of them. To me, those aspects are generally unremarkable - so, the films are generally unremarkable (at best).
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Old 07-18-2013, 04:33 PM   #1168
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False. It's one of the best books ever. Better than the movie.

But it's a bit different, so if one reads the book on the basis of how well it translates the movie, then fail will happen.
I don't understand how they link the movie to the book as they are so different. As for the book, all I can say is "booooring."
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Old 07-18-2013, 04:55 PM   #1169
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I don't understand how they link the movie to the book as they are so different. As for the book, all I can say is "booooring."
Apparently, Hollywood sometimes takes liberties and changes things when they make a movie from a book.

It was not boring. Your face is boring.
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:34 PM   #1170
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Anybody know if The Name of the Wind or The Way of Kings are any good? I am trying decide which series to read.
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Old 07-31-2013, 06:32 AM   #1171
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Read "The Martian". It is amazing. It's basically Castaway meets Mars.
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:52 AM   #1172
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Apparently, Hollywood sometimes takes liberties and changes things when they make a movie from a book...
this is an understatment for said book/movie.
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Old 07-31-2013, 01:12 PM   #1173
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I just finished "The Eye of the god". It is about a plot to steal the Hope diamond from the Smithsonian. It also recounts the bad luck that befell anyone who possessed the Hope diamond, including Marie Antoinette. Anybody who loves a good piece of historical fiction or just a good heist plot should love this book...

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Old 07-31-2013, 02:58 PM   #1174
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I finally finished rereading Hemingways "For Whom the Bell Tolls", gets better every time.

Going to try either "Master and Commander" or "The Things they Carried" by Tim Obrien next.
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Old 08-01-2013, 12:37 PM   #1175
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Don't miss this one -- released last January. It will force you to rethink everything you thought you knew about the Islamic Republic of Iran. (Almost everything you've been told is wrong.) MHG

Going to Tehran: Why the United States Must Come to Terms with the Islamic Republic of Iran [Hardcover]
Flynt Leverett (Author), Hillary Mann Leverett (Author)

Reviews:


"The most important thing I can say is very brief, just three words: Read this book. You’ll find a lot of information that’s not generally available or not available at all and valuable insights that are sharply at odds with conventional views in the United States, views so unchallenged they can fairly be called a ‘party line.’ This book may help, if it’s widely enough understood, to halt a very clear drift towards what could be a terrible war."
—Noam Chomsky

"There is a whole slew of highly dubious assumptions and narratives about Iran and the US's relationship to it that are rarely challenged in any meaningful way in standard media circles. The Leveretts and Going to Tehran are vital to thinking critically about these claims…. Both because of their expertise and their long immersion in these issues, they (and their data-filled book) deserve a prominent voice in all serious debates about Iran."
—Glenn Greenwald, The Guardian

"A reasoned, methodical critique of the ideological folklore that prevents Washington from setting up normal diplomatic relations with Tehran. The Leveretts make an ironclad case that President Barack Obama not only can, but must, "go to Iran" to establish normal diplomatic relations…<>Going to Tehran is likely the most important book on U.S. foreign policy in 2013."
—The Washington Spectator

"This book sheds dramatic light on the central foreign policy of the Iranian government. The Leveretts superbly outline the true intentions of Iran and the way they are using international alliances and soft power to get there."
—The Huffington Post

"The most important work on the subject of U.S.-Iran relations thus far…Thanks to the Leveretts, opponents of U.S. policies of domination and intervention in the Middle East have a new and rich source of analysis to argue against those policies more effectively."
—AntiWar.com

"Going to Tehran arguably represents the most important work on the subject of U.S.-Iran relations to be published thus far…. Thanks to the Leveretts, opponents of U.S. policies of domination and intervention in the Middle East have a new and rich source of analysis to argue against those policies more effectively."
—Consortiumnews.com

"An unorthodox analysis of Iran and a scathing criticism of the US’s foreign policy….US policy-makers need to hear criticisms like these."
—Veterans Today

"The Leveretts present a long and unrelenting history of incompetence and irrationality . . . from the U.S. side"
—Let’s Try Democracy (blog)

"A sharply different deconstruction of the prevailing orthodoxy, worthy of attention."
—Kirkus Reviews

"One needn’t agree with every word in Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett’s new book, Going to Tehran, to grasp its basic truth: U.S. Iran policy is delusional. To shatter this ‘sorry Scheme of Things,’ as the Persian poet describes it, will require a U.S. President with courage, audacity and political skill. It will also require a plan not too different from what the Leveretts lay out."
—<>Lawrence . Wilkerson, former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell

"This brilliant book eviscerates the American case for continued belligerence toward Iran. The evidence of an Iranian bomb is just not there, the Leveretts write, and American diplomacy should be focused on resolving the conflict, and not expanding it. There is a precedent—Nixon and Kissinger's stunning reversal of policy toward China in 1971 that produced the Shanghai Communique, with its public call for mutual respect and a reduction of tensions. It is time, the book concludes, for an American president to reach for peace and go to Tehran."
—<>Seymour Hersh, staff writer, The New Yorker

"This courageous and important book contains the three elements that are necessary for a rethinking of US policy towards Iran: a rigorous critique of the intellectual foundations of present strategy; a devastating expose of misreporting of Iran in the Western media; and a set of bold ideas for how the present dangerous impasse in relations can be broken. It should be essential reading for policymakers and journalists alike."
—<>Anatol Lieven, professor of War Studies, King's College London; senior fellow of the New America Foundation

"Armchair warriors howling to have a go at Iran will denounce this book: you can count on it. Those who have had a bellyful of needless wars will have a different view. Going to Tehran is balanced, sober, impressively documented, and rich in insight. As an antidote to the warmongering that passes for analysis of Iran and US-Iranian relations, its appearance could hardly be more welcome or more timely."
—<>Andrew J. Bacevich, author of Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War
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