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Old 07-11-2011, 03:51 PM   #1
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3D Printer

3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing technology where a three dimensional object is created by laying down successive layers of material. 3D printers are generally faster, more affordable and easier to use than other additive manufacturing technologies. 3D printers offer product developers the ability to print parts and assemblies made of several materials with different mechanical and physical properties in a single build process. Advanced 3D printing technologies yield models that can serve as product prototypes.


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Old 07-11-2011, 03:58 PM   #2
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:59 PM   #3
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These have been around for years. They are now more affordable!
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:05 PM   #4
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I thought WTF at first but wikipedia says it's the real deal.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_printing
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:10 PM   #5
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These have been around for years. They are now more affordable!
I guess someday our great grandkids will find anything they want on the internet and be able to print it at home then drive it away.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:12 PM   #6
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Only thing I dont understand is how the copy of the tool is moveable? Wouldnt you need to disassemble it and have those parts inside the wrench be copied separately so it has the ability to help have the wrench as a moving part (the head to size it up)? I thought it would be more as a prop but it showed it actually worked and was adjusted to the size of the bolt. Pretty cool.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:13 PM   #7
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I guess someday our great grandkids will find anything they want on the internet and be able to print it at home then drive it away.
And then companies will be pissed that someone is digitally downloading their product and making knockoffs of it.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:18 PM   #8
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And then companies will be pissed that someone is digitally downloading their product and making knockoffs of it.
The porn industry will never be the same......
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:28 PM   #9
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This has been around for years but the tech keeps getting better and better. You can print a simple cell phone (according to a friend who worked in the industry for a while).

Future shopping!
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Old 07-11-2011, 05:39 PM   #10
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WOW. that is absolutely amazing! So...if you wanted to do something like an engine, with moving parts, would you have to break it down to scan it?
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:08 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broncocalijohn View Post
Only thing I dont understand is how the copy of the tool is moveable? Wouldnt you need to disassemble it and have those parts inside the wrench be copied separately so it has the ability to help have the wrench as a moving part (the head to size it up)? I thought it would be more as a prop but it showed it actually worked and was adjusted to the size of the bolt. Pretty cool.
It's the beauty of this type of printing. A single layer is printed at a time allowing for those internal moving parts to be made at the same time (while "floating" if you will) as the outer, static part. This **** is sooo cool. It is only restricted by the original piece. Basically whatever you can physically make with other tools, you can make with this
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:09 PM   #12
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I seen this in person, some how my high school had this but of course a lot smaller.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:42 PM   #13
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I read somewhere where a dude was printing out simple organs for transplant use, they are hoping to beable to printout bio based things in the next couple years.

I thought it was BS at 1st also until I googled around and read some Ray Kurzweil books.

We are at an important crossroads that could take off and be ubiquitous in the next couple years.
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Old 07-11-2011, 08:05 PM   #14
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I read somewhere where a dude was printing out simple organs for transplant use, they are hoping to beable to printout bio based things in the next couple years.

I thought it was BS at 1st also until I googled around and read some Ray Kurzweil books.

We are at an important crossroads that could take off and be ubiquitous in the next couple years.
You are right, the future of this in the medical and dental industry is unlimited.
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Old 07-12-2011, 06:39 AM   #15
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There's a bit of info on this in the "odditorium" (located in the WRP forum) -

I am fascinated by this application. I have many "hopes" for it. it will also force IP law to either become better, or worse.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:06 AM   #16
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The dolls from the movie "coraline" were printed.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:53 AM   #17
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Can this thing print that guy's sweater?
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:08 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broncocalijohn View Post
Only thing I dont understand is how the copy of the tool is moveable? Wouldnt you need to disassemble it and have those parts inside the wrench be copied separately so it has the ability to help have the wrench as a moving part (the head to size it up)? I thought it would be more as a prop but it showed it actually worked and was adjusted to the size of the bolt. Pretty cool.
yes. You cannot do a simple scan and get the internal details. There's a bit of "hand-waving" going on here that they don't show.

also, that material is starch based; it's not very strong at all.
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:15 AM   #19
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I don't think that 3D printing will ever be a viable solution for engineering-grade applications. There are some pretty severe material limitations - in terms of making homogeneous materials (i.e. same strengths in different orientations). There is a laser-sintered process that uses metal that is pretty good, but I can see how it would be pretty easy to have voids, inclusions, or other discontinuities.

I certainly wouldn't want to drive around in a car that I made, knowing that there was zero quality control involved in it's manufacture.
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Old 07-12-2011, 01:00 PM   #20
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I don't think that 3D printing will ever be a viable solution for engineering-grade applications. There are some pretty severe material limitations - in terms of making homogeneous materials (i.e. same strengths in different orientations). There is a laser-sintered process that uses metal that is pretty good, but I can see how it would be pretty easy to have voids, inclusions, or other discontinuities.

I certainly wouldn't want to drive around in a car that I made, knowing that there was zero quality control involved in it's manufacture.
You sound like my Manufacturing Processes professor. It's both depressing and reassuring that I understood everything you said on a scientific level.
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Old 07-12-2011, 05:01 PM   #21
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Quote:
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WOW. that is absolutely amazing! So...if you wanted to do something like an engine, with moving parts, would you have to break it down to scan it?
No, you just need a 3d model of it which are readily available online.
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Old 08-27-2013, 12:51 PM   #22
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Check this out! NASA is using 3D printing for componets on the new SLS Platform they are building, they had a successful test of it!


The largest 3-D printed rocket engine component NASA ever has tested blazed to life Thursday, Aug. 22 during an engine firing that generated a record 20,000 pounds of thrust.
This test is a milestone for one of many important advances the agency is making to reduce the cost of space hardware. Innovations like additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, foster new and more cost-effective capabilities in the U.S. space industry.
The component tested during the engine firing, an injector, delivers propellants to power an engine and provides the thrust necessary to send rockets to space. During the injector test, liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen passed through the component into a combustion chamber and produced 10 times more thrust than any injector previously fabricated using 3-D printing.
"This successful test of a 3-D printed rocket injector brings NASA significantly closer to proving this innovative technology can be used to reduce the cost of flight hardware," said Chris Singer, the director of the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville Ala.
The component was manufactured using selective laser melting. This method built up layers of nickel-chromium alloy powder to make the complex, subscale injector with its 28 elements for channeling and mixing propellants. The part was similar in size to injectors that power small rocket engines. It was similar in design to injectors for large engines, such as the RS-25 engine that will power NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket for deep space human missions to an asteroid and Mars.
"This entire effort helped us learn what it takes to build larger 3-D parts -- from design, to manufacturing, to testing," said Greg Barnett, the lead engineer for the project. "This technology can be applied to any of SLS's engines, or to rocket components being built by private industry."
One of the keys to reducing the cost of rocket parts is minimizing the number of components. This injector had only two parts, whereas a similar injector tested earlier had 115 parts. Fewer parts require less assembly effort, which means complex parts made with 3-D printing have the potential for significant cost savings.
"We took the design of an existing injector that we already tested and modified the design so the injector could be made with a 3-D printer," explained Brad Bullard, the propulsion engineer responsible for the design of the injector. "We will be able to directly compare test data for both the traditionally assembled injector and the 3-D printed injector to see if there's any difference in performance."
Early data from the test, conducted at pressures up to 1,400 pounds per square inch absolute and at almost 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit, indicate the injector worked flawlessly. In the days to come, engineers will perform computer scans and other inspections to scrutinize the component more closely.

More here:
http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/syst...l#.Uhz0TBvbN8M

Mods, I know it is On season but this was an exisiting thread, I understand if you have to move it.
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Old 08-27-2013, 01:02 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwill07 View Post
yes. You cannot do a simple scan and get the internal details. There's a bit of "hand-waving" going on here that they don't show.

also, that material is starch based; it's not very strong at all.
You can do both plastic based and metallic 3D manufacturing. We have a printer that does Aluminum and another that can do Titanium that we use for manufacturing of custom medical devices.

It is true that anisotropy is an issue, because the manufacturing happens in layers, there are a lot of build in weaknesses that would not exist if things were machined from a solid piece or cast.
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Old 08-27-2013, 02:59 PM   #24
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You can do both plastic based and metallic 3D manufacturing. We have a printer that does Aluminum and another that can do Titanium that we use for manufacturing of custom medical devices.

It is true that anisotropy is an issue, because the manufacturing happens in layers, there are a lot of build in weaknesses that would not exist if things were machined from a solid piece or cast.
anisotropy is a good word, I'm going to have to remember that one.
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Old 08-27-2013, 05:11 PM   #25
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Quote:
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You can do both plastic based and metallic 3D manufacturing. We have a printer that does Aluminum and another that can do Titanium that we use for manufacturing of custom medical devices.

It is true that anisotropy is an issue, because the manufacturing happens in layers, there are a lot of build in weaknesses that would not exist if things were machined from a solid piece or cast.
Why would I have an issue with a trophy in your anus?

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