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Old 06-22-2013, 07:29 PM   #26
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Major props to AZ and the others for their hard-earned insight.

In November of 2011, I got slammed with a sudden onset of the most horrendous, continuous wave of anxiety attacks. Spent the worst 6 weeks of my life pretty much in bed or around the house, constantly battling strong symptoms. Even woke up in the middle of the night in mid attack a few times, oh man that was the absolutely scariest.

It has been a struggle but I've gotten through the worst of it and am doing better these days.

Wish I had time to write out a longer post, wrong time but alas.

I echo the comments about exercise and living well. An improved diet and new found love of hiking with my dog (btw getting a dog was huge for me personally, totally got me up and going and the loving mutual care part of it was helpful too) has eased the panic attacks greatly. Of course, kicking my cig and pot habit didn't hurt either haha. Still have work left to do but I'll say this: maybe it's not true for all, but for me at least, I think the panic attacks were my subconscious screaming at me and punishing me for not living WELL.
Just goes to show how powerful the subconscious is. When it can tell your body to just crank up the adrenaline while you're sleeping, wow, that's really something isn't it. But I always like to tell people, it can work just as powerfully in the opposite direction. If it's powerful enough to do these bad things, even while you're sleeping, it's certainly powerful enough to do good things also. It's a great idea to read inspirational material. Things that deliver positive message. It's like that saying, you are what you eat, or even you are who you associate with. We seem to take on the characteristics of the things we fill our life with. If you have a stressful job, or relationship, sometimes we tend to try and ignore them, hoping they will fix themselves. As we do so, the seeds of anxiety embed themselves down deep in the subconscious, to awaken some time down the road. Many specialists think that anxiety is caused by the thought process some of us seem to develop. In the way that we think about things. These form a neural network in our brain and when we get in the same situation, the path of these neurons is already set in our brains, and we have the same symptoms. The brain has tremendous plasticity so we can change these neural pathways. But it's important to give yourself positive thoughts throughout the entire day, every day. Write it down, read it, listen to it, feel it, smell it. The more senses you use to feed these positive messages into your subconscious the more effective it is. This is why it's important to read positive things, to smell wonderful things, to write write positive things down, to listen to therapeutic sounds or music, to get a massage. I try to deliver positive energy into my subconscious with all of my senses (sight, sound, touch, smell) as often as I can.

And just a quick mention for those who smoke or (like myself) use chew tobacco. Nicotine is bad stuff, especially for those with anxiety and sleep disorders. I've grabbed a few technical phrases below but essentially what it does is causes the body to produce adrenaline which causes increases heart rate and speeds up respiration, as well it raises blood pressure. These are all things your body tries to do the opposite of when it wants to relax and/or go to sleep. The body wants to slow heart rate, slow respiration and lower blood pressure. So if you smoke or chew and you have a hard time sleeping or relaxing, give up the tobacco. I used to chew a can a week. I'm down to 1 dip per day now and I hope to be off completely in another month or so. Having anxiety, they say it's not good to go cold turkey, which I agree. You don't need another thing to stress about. But make a plan and get off it. Not only will this help your anxiety as you start to reduce the amount of nicotine you pump into your body, but psychologically it will help also because you know you are doing something positive.


In the sympathetic nervous system Nicotine also activates the sympathetic nervous system, acting via splanchnic nerves to the adrenal medulla, stimulates the release of epinephrine. Acetylcholine released by preganglionic sympathetic fibers of these nerves acts on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, causing the release of epinephrine (and noradrenaline) into the bloodstream. Nicotine also has an affinity for melanin-containing tissues due to its precursor function in melanin synthesis or due to the irreversible binding of melanin and nicotine. This has been suggested to underlie the increased nicotine dependence and lower smoking cessation rates in darker pigmented individuals. However, further research is warranted before a definite conclusive link can be inferred.
In adrenal medulla.


Effect of nicotine on chromaffin cells. By binding to ganglion type nicotinic receptors in the adrenal medulla nicotine increases flow of adrenaline (epinephrine), a stimulating hormone and neurotransmitter. By binding to the receptors, it causes cell depolarization and an influx of calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels. Calcium triggers the exocytosis of chromaffin granules and thus the release of epinephrine (and norepinephrine) into the bloodstream. The release of epinephrine (adrenaline) causes an increase in heart rate, blood pressure and respiration, as well as higher blood glucose levels.
Nicotine is the natural product of tobacco, having a half-life of 1 to 2 hours. Cotinine is an active metabolite of nicotine that remains in the blood for 18 to 20 hours, making it easier to analyze due to its longer half-life.
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Old 06-22-2013, 07:48 PM   #27
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For about 3 months last year I lived in a constant state of dread due to the tragic loss of a close friend, stress from work, resulting health issues and panic attacks. I'm fairly active but upped my exercise schedule to daily and completely changed my diet. Nothing worked until I totally cut out caffeine. Once I did that, everything returned to normal within a very short timeframe.
It's amazing how some things such as caffeine or nicotine do things to one person and not another person. Some people can handle all the stimulants while others are super sensitive to them. I cut out caffeine also. Well I drink decaf coffee, and that does have a little bit of caffeine but nothing close to what regular coffee has. I thought cutting caffeine was going to be a b**** but it turns out it wasn't hard at all. And now I find that I don't even drink soda that often. I think I've had a caffeine free diet coke like 5 times this year and that's it.
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:16 PM   #28
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Realizing its all anxiety and knowing yourself is an important first step. A procedure to remind yourself of that when you feel stressed is important. You are freaking out over bills? then sit down and say ok this is just me being unreasonabley anxious and not a real problem. Then write down (important to write) all the important things you know you need to get done. Write down even things like Bills need to be paid, plenty of money to do so and it isn't a problem.

Or write down other things you know are important and need to be done. Like wife is awesome. Make sure you take her to dinner and tell her how lucky you are to have her.

I know it sounds silly but my doctor taught me when you write things down it puts them into a different part of your brain as far as memory goes. Its like it puts them in the I am handling these things, or I have great knowledge of these things category.

Then last how do you sleep? hours without waking up, or does anxiety effect that?
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:21 PM   #29
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It's amazing how some things such as caffeine or nicotine do things to one person and not another person. Some people can handle all the stimulants while others are super sensitive to them. I cut out caffeine also. Well I drink decaf coffee, and that does have a little bit of caffeine but nothing close to what regular coffee has. I thought cutting caffeine was going to be a b**** but it turns out it wasn't hard at all. And now I find that I don't even drink soda that often. I think I've had a caffeine free diet coke like 5 times this year and that's it.
I'm not in good shape yet but i cut out all soda about 3 months ago. I feel a lot better already that stuff is straight poison I think. I always drank diet coke but i believe it when people says its str8 addicting. Things that taste like sugar but aren't not only fool your taste buds, they can fool your body also not knowing what the **** it is or how to process it.

What we eat is going to be the next big evolution of our market IMO.
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:29 PM   #30
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Anyone else on here have anxiety issues? Apparently it runs in the family as both my mom and younger brother are on medicine already. I currently get crazy anxious over tiny things, like when I have bills coming up and have enough to pay them but I am anxious about it anyway. Feels like I cheated on my wife and she is about to find out. I used to drink a lot but realized I was turning into an Alcoholic so I have given that up as well. Now I just work more, when I am working I feel OK- But who wants to work and sleep only.

Deleted Earlier-A little Known Tebow effect.
What you're describing sounds much more like situational anxiety than an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders (which is somewhat of a misnomer) develops during long periods of stress, trauma, post-trauma... when your body/brain are oversensitized for long periods of time, and thinking patterns and body cycles become cyclical. Most people think of "anxiety' as just worrying about something like a test... bills or a wedding. But sustained stress and worry can lead to states where you feel sick and worried, and you can't figure out why. Then, guess what... you worry about being sick! Ugly cycle if you don't recognize it early.

It's perfectly human, perfectly normal and there is nothing "wrong" with you.
Every person on this forum has the capacity to end up with anxiety/panic attacks if the right (wrong) situations arise. But, some people manage stress more efficiently... perhaps don't face the right kind of stressors.. or perhaps are at stages in their lives where their body can cope.

I've been through this, big-time... due to life stress, overwork and other issues.
I know how bad it can be, but I also know there are major misconceptions about it and your family doctor (and probably psychiatrist/psychologist) are ****ing clueless.

I throw out my 2 cents... and you can take it or leave it...

1. Anxiety/Panic are NOT chemical imbalances any more than being hungry when you haven't eaten or being tired when you haven't slept. Are your chemicals imbalanced? Sure... because your body/mind have been in a cycle of symptoms/worry/stress/symptoms/worry/stress. Why should it surprise us that our chemistry changes? No different than any other function of the body.
Which leads to my next point...

2. Avoid medications at ALL COSTS. This should actually be #1. DO NOT listen to your idiot GP who will slap antidepressants on the table and send you on your way. Luckily, I didn't go that route... though I did have a short run taking relaxants which were prescribed at the peak of my stress. They made me worse... immediately and made everything take longer to shake.
I repeat, while meds may help some people... they are not a fix. They are a short-term bandage that wind up being much worse than the original problem for most people.

3. Simple cognitive behavioral work can fix all of this, along with learning to relax... take time for yourself, realizing you're not superman, etc. There are tons of great sources on the web to deal with this organically. It's a simple, natural, human condition. At first you won't believe that you stress and thought patterns can have the symptoms it does... but the mind/nervous system can be absolutely torturous when pushed beyond its normal limits.

I'm not at all surprised to see the big response to this thread. Estimates put it around 30% of the population that deals with anxiety/panic... but I think that's a low estimate and that many polled just haven't hit that patch of time in life yet. I'd estimate more like 50% deal with some form of anxiety/panic/stress-disorder in their lifetimes.

Again, it's normal... human... no different than getting an ulcer or high blood pressure due to stress. We all react differently. Start working with some CBT and get that stress down, learn to meditate, exercise right, eat clean and you'll be back in business.

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Old 06-22-2013, 09:40 PM   #31
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Struggled with anxiety my entire adult life. Not going to pretend to have all of the solutions, but here's my two cents on what has worked for me over the past couple of years.

1.) Cutting/eliminating alcohol consumption is really important. I spent most of my 20's binge drinking and at times being a borderline functioning alcoholic. It wasn't until my 30's that I realized alcohol was sort of a crutch to feel comfortable in social situations and as a way to suppress anxiety about bills/relationships etc.

2.) Exercise strenuously a minimum of 4 days a week. No exceptions.

3.) Make sure to balance your life with task completion activities. Hobbies/activities that have a finite beginning and completion.

4.) Maintain a regular sleep schedule as much as possible. When the thoughts are racing in your head, get up and do stuff (even if it means being tired the next day.) When the next day comes, don't take a nap, and return to normal bedtime.

5.) Eat as cleanly as possible. Avoid refined sugar, high fructose corn-syrup, and processed foods in general. Eat as raw as you can (lean cuts of meat, fruits/veggies etc.)

6.) Keep a daily journal. Do not self-censor your thoughts in your journal.
This is simple very solid advice for living life no matter your disease.

I would add meditation though that is really just a variant of #6.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:47 PM   #32
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What you're describing sounds much more like situational anxiety than an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders (which is somewhat of a misnomer) develops during long periods of stress, trauma, post-trauma... when your body/brain are oversensitized for long periods of time, and thinking patterns and body cycles become cyclical. Most people think of "anxiety' as just worrying about something like a test... bills or a wedding. But sustained stress and worry can lead to states where you feel sick and worried, and you can't figure out why. Then, guess what... you worry about being sick! Ugly cycle if you don't recognize it early.

It's perfectly human, perfectly normal and there is nothing "wrong" with you.
Every person on this forum has the capacity to end up with anxiety/panic attacks if the right (wrong) situations arise. But, some people manage stress more efficiently... perhaps don't face the right kind of stressors.. or perhaps are at stages in their lives where their body can cope.

I've been through this, big-time... due to life stress, overwork and other issues.
I know how bad it can be, but I also know there are major misconceptions about it and your family doctor (and probably psychiatrist/psychologist) are ****ing clueless.

I throw out my 2 cents... and you can take it or leave it...

1. Anxiety/Panic are NOT chemical imbalances any more than being hungry when you haven't eaten or being tired when you haven't slept. Are your chemicals imbalanced? Sure... because your body/mind have been in a cycle of symptoms/worry/stress/symptoms/worry/stress. Why should it surprise us that our chemistry changes? No different than any other function of the body.
Which leads to my next point...

2. Avoid medications at ALL COSTS. This should actually be #1. DO NOT listen to your idiot GP who will slap antidepressants on the table and send you on your way. Luckily, I didn't go that route... though I did have a short run taking relaxants which were prescribed at the peak of my stress. They made me worse... immediately and made everything take longer to shake.
I repeat, while meds may help some people... they are not a fix. They are a short-term bandage that wind up being much worse than the original problem for most people.

3. Simple cognitive behavioral work can fix all of this, along with learning to relax... take time for yourself, realizing you're not superman, etc. There are tons of great sources on the web to deal with this organically. It's a simple, natural, human condition. At first you won't believe that you stress and thought patterns can have the symptoms it does... but the mind/nervous system can be absolutely torturous when pushed beyond its normal limits.

I'm not at all surprised to see the big response to this thread. Estimates put it around 30% of the population that deals with anxiety/panic... but I think that's a low estimate and that many polled just haven't hit that patch of time in life yet. I'd estimate more like 50% deal with some form of anxiety/panic/stress-disorder in their lifetimes.

Again, it's normal... human... no different than getting an ulcer or high blood pressure due to stress. We all react differently. Start working with some CBT and get that stress down, learn to meditate, exercise right, eat clean and you'll be back in business.
I think the % is actually much higher as well. I remember my first panic attack when I was 20 and especially as a man, you think you will be perceived as weak for having had one. So you don't tell anybody about it. I played it off as if I had stayed up all night and didn't have any breakfast and that's what was causing my hands to shake. I am certain I wasn't the only young male to have gone through this and did not want anybody to know.

But you hit on a very important topic that hasn't been brought up yet. One of the reasons it takes quite awhile to get over severe anxiety is that it doesn't come on quickly either. A person might think so but that's just episodes of being anxious. The actual anxiety disorder is indeed going through long periods of high stress. And that goes right along with what I posted about developing neural pathways. Those don't just change over night, those take months and years to develop. That is why when somebody has made the decision to try and beat their anxiety disorder naturally, it's important to not give up after a month or 2 or 3 and then say F this I can't do it I need to go on drugs. It takes time. It will happen. If you take all the positive things people have said in this thread and start doing them (the exercise, the eating right, the writing stuff down, goal setting, taking breaks from work, getting in the sun, stop with the stimulants) you will see things go back to normal. Remember though, as I said before, it normally doesn't just click. You will notice good days. You'll have some bad days. Then more good days, and then you'll get into having good weeks, some bad weeks, and so on. But it just keeps getting better if you stick with it.


I've personally not used CBT but I'm always interested in hearing what types of CBT others have done. It's a pretty wide open subject with some scrutiny. Would you share some specifics of your CBT Popps?

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Old 06-22-2013, 09:56 PM   #33
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I'm not in good shape yet but i cut out all soda about 3 months ago. I feel a lot better already that stuff is straight poison I think. I always drank diet coke but i believe it when people says its str8 addicting. Things that taste like sugar but aren't not only fool your taste buds, they can fool your body also not knowing what the **** it is or how to process it.

What we eat is going to be the next big evolution of our market IMO.
Well you don't have to be in great shape for the exercise thing to work for you. All that is required is that you work out until you feel exhausted. So for the person who is out of shape, that might be 15 minutes. But as you continue to get in better shape, you have to increase the amount of time you exercise. It can happen pretty quick. While you still might have a lot of fat, your cardiovascular system and your muscular system will get in shape within a few weeks. So be sure to increase the amount of exercise based on that, and not how you look. Having a gut has nothing to do with it. When I hike or mountain bike, I see guys with some decent sized beer guts still cruising up the hills on their bikes and they can go for an hour.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:26 PM   #34
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I've personally not used CBT but I'm always interested in hearing what types of CBT others have done. It's a pretty wide open subject with some scrutiny. Would you share some specifics of your CBT Popps?
Most of mine dealt with learning to cope with extreme, severe physical pain and distress... and to not cycle the worry over what was happening. So, for instance... my first trigger (unknown to me) that stress in my life was piling up was migraines. Of course, most people think migraines are a physical issue... and they may be to some extent. But, they are also highly tied to stress and for me, they came and went with that period.

My work was to learn to not react when the debilitating headaches would come on. (Mine would last 12-48 hours, and no medicine could make a dent in them.)
So, I had to learn to work my gig, run my side business and care for my child in physical distress... without creating stories or worries in my mind about where things were going. Because the truth is... things weren't going anywhere unless I took them there. Stress begets stress and worry begets stress and worry.

Reframing thoughts about physical symptoms is a starting place for most people. If I was at work and had a panic attack, I learned to laugh it off. No one would have any idea. I'd keep smiling, keep working and knew that I could only make it worse by having concern about it. If I let it come, and let it pass... things would get back to normal. But, if I fretted as I did early on, that creates more tension, more attacks and the cycle goes the wrong way.

So the work starts with that for most... because until you can smile, relax and work though symptoms... you're going to keep chasing your tail. Early in my process of getting over it, I had days where I worked when I guarantee you anyone else would been in the ER, fearing for their life. But, they're just feelings. Fleeting warnings that your nervous system has had enough, and you need to stop feeding it stress and fear.

Beyond that, step 2 for most is dealing with life factors more effectively.
I had to be taught that I had limits. I was in demand in my field, and continued to take on more and more... and humans aren't built to run in 5th gear all the time. You simply can't sustain it. Beyond that, you may work on interpersonal relationship type stuff. Not letting coworkers affect you, creating good boundaries with family, are a couple of common examples of day to day things you THINK you may be handling well, but in fact may be creating unseen stress. A lot of us create scenarios for ourselves we feel we have to live up to... and in turn nonstop stress.

It's deep ****, and at the same time all simple and all very human.
CBT just helps you get at it, because for most who suffer... the causes are usually unknown to them.

Also keep in mind, growing bodies of evidence now show that everything from GERD to back pain may have its genesis in stress and mental processes. That doesn't mean back pain is "all in your head"..... it means that it started with stress. Stress can manifest in ways you absolutely wouldn't believe. You can research the work of Dr. John Sarno to learn more about that. But, mind-body science is rapidly beginning to understand that so many of the chronic health issues we face are not organic physical issues, rather expressions of emotional pain, stress, etc. It's fascinating. In other words, someone may be reading this thread thinking... "I don't have anxiety, I'm fine." Meanwhile, they deal with high blood pressure, acid reflux and headaches that they think are just genetic.... and that's probably not the case.

The biggest issue for most... is facing the fact that their physical pain may be caused by emotional issues or stress. Especially men. Most men would rather die in pain than admit that their back pain may be the result of emotional stress. After all, we're dudes... having emotions is for pussies.
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Old 06-23-2013, 10:41 AM   #35
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When I was in kindergarten, I was told I would have to get up in front of the class the next day for a presentation or something. I was always a shy kid and this terrified me. I got so worked up over it that I broke out with hives. After getting up and doing whatever I was supposed to do, I realized it wasn't worth all the stress and emotional discourse. I haven't stressed out like that since.

A lot of anxiety is a matter of how you deal with a given situation. A few posters have given excellent advice on ways of reducing internal stimuli. The best thing to know about it is, you can control it. Don't let the snowball effect turn you into a complete embarrassing mess.

Hands/feet and lips turn all numb and tingly? It's part of what are called carpal-pedal spasms and it's because you've been breathing too fast for too long. You've taken in much more oxygen than your body can displace so it builds up in your extremities. It will get more and more painful (causing people to freak out even more) until your body steps in and says, "That's it!", and you pass out. You may not even breathe for several minutes because of how much oxygen you have built up. The passing out part is your body hitting a reset button.

I have encountered a LOT of people having panic attacks, or states of hyper anxiety, and a number of them end up having full cardiac work ups done in an ER. I think the modern lifestyle and people's efforts to keep up play a tremendous role in these attacks. There are a lot of people out there who are dependent on Xanax other medicines just to get through a typical day. I applaud those who are making committed efforts to change their habits and avoid the downward spiral of prescription drugs. Have you ever seen someone in a panic because they forgot or ran out of their anti-anxiety meds?
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Old 06-23-2013, 11:10 AM   #36
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Have your stool checked for parasites. Very often the cause of anxiety also very often over looked.
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Old 06-23-2013, 11:32 AM   #37
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Anxiety runs in my family too, I had it pretty bad during university. Luckily as a student I had free access to the school's psychiatrists. I was put on a light dose of Effexor, and with that I was able to start doing the stuff I had such severe anxiety over, to the point where my brain stopped thinking of it as being a big deal (cognitive behavioural therapy), at which point I was able to wean off the meds. I was off them for five years but recently have gone back on them after I started having some issues again after undergoing several major life changes in a short time span.

Long story short, it's an illness, and it's ok to take medication for it. Don't let it be stigmatized.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:03 PM   #38
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I never had a panic attack until after my 2nd accident.

The 1st one hosed up a nerve in my neck. The 2nd one hosed up my Lumbar.

The 1st Panic attack I had was while getting my hair cut and the stylist turned my head funny. I felt like I blacked out for a second and my whole body started pounding and I thought I was having a heart attack.

My wife took me to the Dr and he gave me a Zanax in the room and it calmed down.

After that all it would take was to be in the car and have someone slam on their brakes or if I turned funny enough to have the nerve freak out my chest muscles.

It was really bad for about 2-4 months then it slowly has calmed down, I would not want to have to deal with that all the time. The chronic pain is enough. Breathing and going to happy place seemed to help me. Plus once I knew it wasn't a heart attack and just the muscle pain from the nerve in my neck I was able to relax more. Plus I try not to drive in rush hour any more.

I was driving Friday when a guy locked his tires up behind me and I didn't freak out with a full blown attack so there is that progress.

Good luck to those of you with it. It is no fun and totally hard to explain to people until you go through it. I had friends who had them real bad and I though I knew but I had no idea.
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Old 06-23-2013, 01:34 PM   #39
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I have encountered a LOT of people having panic attacks, or states of hyper anxiety, and a number of them end up having full cardiac work ups done in an ER. I think the modern lifestyle and people's efforts to keep up play a tremendous role in these attacks. There are a lot of people out there who are dependent on Xanax other medicines just to get through a typical day. I applaud those who are making committed efforts to change their habits and avoid the downward spiral of prescription drugs. Have you ever seen someone in a panic because they forgot or ran out of their anti-anxiety meds?
Excellent observation, and explanations.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:23 AM   #40
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I appreciate all the feedback. I am implementing a lot of the recommendations.

1- more exercise
2- goal writing
3- achievable projects on weekends.
4- Dr appointment on Monday. Hesitant on medicine.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:40 AM   #41
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I'm a big fan of 5-HTP and Tyrosine.

But you have to be living clean and exercising regularly to really get the benefit.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:56 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by baja View Post
Have your stool checked for parasites. Very often the cause of anxiety also very often over looked.
We don't all live in Mexico.

No but seriously, I'll bet most of us on this forum suffer from anxiety of some form or another. Internet forums are full of people just like us. You're not alone and thinking you are only makes the situation worse. If I could give only one piece of advice, it would be to get exercise regularly, a healthy body goes a long way in fostering a healthy mind.

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Old 06-24-2013, 12:32 PM   #43
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Great advice on this thread, again. I would only give slight caution to remember that a perfectly healthy (physically) person can wind up with a stress disorder. I was in the gym 5 day a week, eating clean and in peak physical condition when things hit me. In fact, that drive to be in top physical shape can over-stress the body in some cases if coupled with major life stressors. My guess is that 8 out of 10 times when someone starts having physical manifestations of stress like panic, migraines or other seemingly out of the blue health issues... it's because of emotional/mental stress more often than something physically organic. But, we're brought up in this country with the auto-mechanic model for health-care, so we're all inclined to think that way. It's a tough habit to break.

That said, exercising regularly is paramount... there just may be times you have to curtail it so your body can recover.
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:33 PM   #44
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Agree with Zona ... meds are not the answer. SSRIs are worth a shot - low-risk, high-ceiling, but please don't let some lazy therapist get you started on benzodiazepines (though Dr. Broncenstein probably has a more learned take on those). B vitamins, minerals, exercise ... meditation worked for Howard Stern.


Sounds like you have a good plan, but "huh??" hit on something from my experience. I urge you and anyone else to focus on possible psychosomatic causes or contributions. The mind is so powerful ... I was once gifted a pointed lesson on that power: I was in a stressful work situation in the 80s, and as the stress built I started having heart problems ... real live symptoms: actual chest pains, left arm and shoulder pain, palpitations. I know panic attack and heart attack symptoms overlap, but this was different, there were no dramatic episodes, just recurrent, persistent symptoms. About two months into this I woke up one night with my chest burning, so I drove to the ER and waited on a doctor. Literally as he pulled back the curtain, all symptoms stopped. Permanently, on a dime. Wanted to leave, but he checked me out, said I was fine. He was right, about my heart at least, nothing was wrong with it.

Also recall in the 90s men who were at-risk for HIV or thought they were, but were too afraid to get tested, many experienced full-bore symptoms of infection ... drenching night sweats, actual throat fungal infections - diagnosable thrush. When they finally tested they were ok, and symptoms ended.

My guess is these kinds of psychosomatic causes, usually far more subtle than my examples, occur all the time and to everyone. Try to keep an open mind regarding such things is all.


Popps, previous post, yes definitely.

Last edited by BroncoBuff; 06-24-2013 at 12:39 PM..
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Old 06-24-2013, 04:23 PM   #45
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1. Exercise a ****load (cardio) as it helps with brain functioning
2. Get sun
3. Confide in others
4. Understand where your brain stops and you start. Think outside your own emotions.
5. Take fish oils
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Old 06-24-2013, 10:22 PM   #46
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Interesting thread. Good advice - except for the medication angle, I wouldn't go that way. Never tried it but I think that opens up a whole new can of worms.

Exercise, easily achievable goals like simply cleaning the garage, weeding the lawn, changing the oil on your vehicles, detailing your vehicles, anything that results in a sense of accomplishment, simple physical labor that takes your mind off of your worries.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:29 PM   #47
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Quote:
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I'm a big fan of 5-HTP and Tyrosine.

But you have to be living clean and exercising regularly to really get the benefit.
Tyrosine is more for depression. As with many medications, one of it's side affects is that it can cause anxiety. I always like how those drug companies advertise how their drug helps anxiety but then you look at the side affects and one of them is always, can cause anxiety. I mean, how stupid is that? I've tried 5HTP but didn't really notice much.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:05 AM   #48
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Thought this was a really revealing article and just how important sun light is mental health.



The association between darkness and depression is well known. Now a new study reveals the profound changes that light deprivation causes in your brain.

Neuroscientists kept rats in the dark for six weeks. The animals not only exhibited depressive behavior but also suffered damage in brain regions known to be underactive in humans during depression.

Further, neurons that produce norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin, which are common neurotransmitters involved in emotion, pleasure and cognition, were observed in the process of dying. This neuronal death may be the mechanism underlying the darkness-related blues of seasonal affective disorder.

The dark-induced effects may stem from a disruption of the body’s clock. When an organism’s circadian system is not receiving normal light, that in turn might lead to changes in brain systems that regulate mood, the lead researcher said.


more.............


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...al-health.aspx
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Old 06-25-2013, 07:13 AM   #49
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A lot of sound advice in this thread. Thanks everyone.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:33 PM   #50
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It's ok to take medicine. I've been taking anti depressants since 1992. It works and if I don't take them I get very very depressed. My grandma took Xanax and other stuff for many years and lived to be 90.
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