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Old 05-12-2013, 08:33 PM   #101
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How many times have you made this claim and for how many countries??

You're a war monger who salivates at the prospect of being right.....just once.
Gaff isn't always wrong, he's just never right, yet.
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:47 AM   #102
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WTF are you reading?
One would almost assume he can't read! Clearly he can, but I'm not sure he can really understand much that he reads above the grammar school level. If nothing else he's good for some laughs.
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:05 AM   #103
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Do we REALLY want to get involved in backing this kind of group? Stay the f-out of it:


GRAPHIC: Syrian Rebel Filmed Eating Heart of Enemy Soldier
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:02 AM   #104
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We do need to be involved though. To make sure these militants don't win. I actually believe that israel is helping assad. The probably did bomb that convoy because it was going to the rebels. The rebels in all cases so far have been worst and more unfriendly then the govts they replaced. If Obama has not figured that out by now then cmon.

Obama did a good job by staying out of this one.
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Old 05-17-2013, 05:30 PM   #105
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A new poll shows that public opinion in Syria has shifted back in favor of President Assad's government.

Why?

Well, probably because the Syrian people now understand that a proxy war is raging in their country -- and that outside forces (the US, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Europe and others) are trying to cause mayhem in Syria, that is, are trying to create another failed state, like Libya.

Assad is winning the war - which probably explains the recent Israeli attack. Probably it was intended to create a pretext for western intervention -- IF Syria responded to the attack.

MHG

WEEKEND EDITION MAY 17-19, 2013


UN General Assembly Vote Reflects Shift in Syrian Public Opinion

by FRANKLIN LAMB


http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/05/...ublic-opinion/

It’s not hard to find critics of the Assad government in the Governorate (Muhafazat) of Homs or for that matter, to varying degrees in Syria’s other thirteen Governorates according to Syrian analysts interviewed by this observer and reports from human rights groups including lawyers representing dissidents in Syria. However, after nearly 27 months of turmoil, the public opinion pendulum is markedly shifting back in support of the current regime.

One international political result was registered at the United Nations this past week when a US-Qatari-Saudi drafted General Assembly Resolution that was designed to increase pressure on the Assad government stumbled badly and fell far short of what the Saudi Ambassador to the UN and other US allies predicted would be an overwhelming vote in favor.

Effect of shift in popular opinion in Syria

Over the past four or five months it has become increasingly clear that public opinion in Syria is shifting for reasons that include, but are not limited to the following:

While inflation at the grocery stores in probably the most common complaint heard from a cross-section of society here, the population is adapting somewhat to higher prices and it appears to credit the government for efforts, some successful, to soften the impact of the illegal US-led sanctions that target this same Syrian population for purely political reasons to achieve regime change.

While Syrians demand dignity and freedom from oppressive security forces and an end to corruption, as all people do in this region and beyond, they are witnessing a return to near normalcy with respect to supplies of electricity, benzene, mazout fuel oil, bus schedules, schools, and a host of public services such as garbage collection, street sweeping, park maintenance, and sympathetic traffic cops who are rather understanding of short-cuts taken by drivers and pedestrians due to “the situation”.

In addition, public service announcement and even text messages demonstrate that the government is aware of the degree of suffering among the population, accept partial blame, and are focusing on remedial measure and crucially, ending the crisis with its horrific bloodshed. One observes here a definite trend of the pulling together of a high percentage of Syrians who share a very unique history and culture and who are deeply connected to their country and who are increasingly repelled by the continuing killing from all sides including the recent barbarisms of body mutilations and summary executions videotaped and broadcast on utube by jihadist elements. The latter who these days come from nearly three dozen countries, paid for and indoctrinated by enemies of Syria’s Arab nationalism and deep rooted pillar of resistance to the occupation of Palestine.

In addition, many among Syria’s 23 million citizens, who initially supported the uprising following government reaction to event in Deraa in March 2011, now have serious second thoughts about who exactly would replace the current government. Events in Syria are also making plain that the army is still loyal to the Assad government, and according to Jane’s Defense Weekly, is actually gaining experience and strength as well as the well-known fact that as western diplomats are admitting, the “opposition militias” are hopelessly fractured, turning one another, many essential mafia outfits, and beginning to resemble their fellow jihadists from Libya, Chechnya and in between.

Opinion in Damascus and surrounding areas visited this past week, confirms this observers experience the past five months of a sharp and fairly rapid shift in opinion that now strongly favors letting the Syrian people themselves decide, without outside interference, whether the Assad regime will stay, and indeed, whether, the Baathist party will continue to represent majority opinion, not through wanton violence but rather via next June’s election. Many express confidence in the run up to this critical vote, noting that the election will be closely monitored by the international community to assure fairness.

Perhaps aided by the current glorious May weather, a certain optimism, that was more scarce in the past, pervades many neighborhoods.

For different reasons, foreign powers, including the USA, Turkey, European Union, the UK Jordan and even the majority population of the six Gulf Cooperation Council family run countries, according to Pew Research, are shifting their earlier positions which were based in part of the US administration, NATO, and Israeli assurances that the Assad government would surely fall quickly, “A matter of days, not weeks” US President Obama promised. That was two years ago.

As noted above, this trend has accelerated since the UN General Assembly vote with last weeks which did not go as planned on the biased and politicized non-binding draft resolution on Syria.

The public reaction in Syria and across the Middle East is substantially that the “Friends of Syria” non-binding GA resolution contradicts the reality on the ground, backs terrorism in Syria and hinders the international efforts to help achieve a political solution to the crisis in this country. Only 107 states voted in favor of the resolution, 12 against while 59 countries, mostly from Africa and Latin America, abstained from voting.

One reason the vote fell short of the 130 favorable votes that the basically same resolution garnered the past two times is that it is widely viewed as ignoring the crimes and atrocities committed by the armed jihadist groups in Syria and the flow of thousands of international terrorists backed by the West, the Gulf states and Turkey who provide them with weapons and money. According to the Russian delegate, backed by several other speakers, “the resolutions ignores all the terrorists’ heinous crimes and denounces what it called the escalation of the attacks by the Syrian government”. Afterward one Latin American Permanent Representative told Inner City Press that the count would have been below 100 if not for some “last minute arm-twisting.” As it turned out, 15 countries didn’t vote at all, opting to “get coffee,” as one African Permanent Representative put it before the vote.

Syria’s Ambassador al-Jaafari exposes a hoax in the Gulf

Syria’s permanent Envoy to the UN Bashar al-Jaafari said his country regretted the adoption of a biased and unbalanced UN resolution, thanking the countries that rejected the resolution “for their responsible positions which support the UN principles and the international law articles”. He noted that the decrease in the number of countries that voted in favor and the increase of numbers of those who abstained from voting indicates the growing international understanding of the reality of what is happening in Syria due to the foreign interference, support of terrorism, the spread of extremism and incitement besides the refusal of dialogue.

“We rely on the UN and its member states to support Syria and its people against the culture of extremism and terrorism, and to encourage the comprehensive national dialogue to peacefully resolve the Syrian crisis.” he said. In a statement released after the vote on the UN draft resolution on Syria, al-Jaafari He said that the French delegation had foiled the issuance of a number of UN press releases to condemn the terrorist acts committed by al-Qaeda-linked armed groups in Syria which claimed the lives of thousands of Syrians as it foiled a UN release to condemn the attempt of assassination of the Syrian Premier.

After Qatar’s ambassador spoke in favor of the resolution his country drafted (and re-drafted several time), Ja’afari revealed that there existed an e-mail, from the representative of the Syrian opposition given to Syria’s embassy in Qatar, showing Qatar’s involvement in the kidnapping of UN peacekeepers by the Yarmouk Martyrs Brigade. He read out a phone number from the e-mail as several Gulf diplomats grimaced or scowled, and three left the Chamber.

Visibly stunned, the UK Permanent Representative Lyall Grant called the whole matter “deeply confusing”. Another Permanent Representative, from a militia contributing country, said that if true, it’s “very problematic.” The reasons include the fact that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon had just thanked Qatar for its roles in the release of the UN Peacekeepers the earlier kidnapping of whom the Qatari government may have planned, paid for and executed.

Meanwhile, Ban Ki-moon’s spokesperson Martin Nesirky said he would not disclose any more about the “negotiations to free the peacekeepers or who was behind the crime.”

Score a major diplomatic victory for Syria’s UN Ambassador as public opinion shifts in favor of the Assad government and pressure as well as certain optimism builds in the run-up to the Geneva II conference being organized by the White House and the Kremlin.

Franklin Lamb is doing research in Syria and Lebanon and can be reached c/o fplamb@gmail.com
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Old 05-18-2013, 04:57 PM   #106
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When was America at its apex, gaffe?
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:02 PM   #107
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1952
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:20 PM   #108
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1952
, probably one of the ugliest times,from segragation-the lynchings which part made it our apex?
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:00 PM   #109
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More Americans had a higher quality of life. Jobs, good pay, security, retirement to look forward to, family. But mostly FREEDOM TO BE WHO YOU ARE.

How old are you anyway. I bet too young to remember America in the 50's. That would be the only explanation.
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:16 PM   #110
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More Americans had a higher quality of life. Jobs, good pay, security, retirement to look forward to, family. But mostly FREEDOM TO BE WHO YOU ARE.
Except for women. And blacks. And Asians. And Latinos. And homosexuals. And Jews. And Catholics.

1952 was the apex for straight WASP men. Not for anyone else.

Try again, ****wad.
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:22 PM   #111
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Except for women. And blacks. And Asians. And Latinos. And homosexuals. And Jews. And Catholics.

1952 was the apex for straight WASP men. Not for anyone else.

Try again, ****wad.

You should ask women and blacks and Latinos and Asians of the early 50's if they were better off then or now.

What is Freedom worth
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:07 PM   #112
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More Americans had a higher quality of life. Jobs, good pay, security, retirement to look forward to, family. But mostly FREEDOM TO BE WHO YOU ARE.

How old are you anyway. I bet too young to remember America in the 50's. That would be the only explanation.
I suppose if you were white, it was a great time. You could eat with your own kind,you could kill a black man & be found not guilty,but what do I know. I'm not white.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:11 PM   #113
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I suppose if you were white, it was a great time. You could eat with your own kind,you could kill a black man & be found not guilty,but what do I know. I'm not white.
Never said it was without problems. I said it was the best of times for the greater number of people.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:12 PM   #114
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You think the black man is thrilled with his quality of life today.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:19 PM   #115
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Young Blacks without jobs - 40%

There are almost 1 million blacks in jail today.

Yup things are really looking up for the black man....
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:20 PM   #116
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You should ask women and blacks and Latinos and Asians of the early 50's if they were better off then or now.
I have a pretty good idea that they'd say they're better off now.

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What is Freedom worth
Freedom for whom and for what?
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:21 PM   #117
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1. While people of color make up about 30 percent of the United States’ population, they account for 60 percent of those imprisoned. The prison population grew by 700 percent from 1970 to 2005, a rate that is outpacing crime and population rates. The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.

2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately three times more likely to be searchedduring a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.

3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than 70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics one-fifth of confined youth today.

4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that 96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than 70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.

5. African American youth have higher rates of juvenile incarceration and are more likely to be sentenced to adult prison. According to the Sentencing Project, even though African American juvenile youth are about 16 percent of the youth population, 37 percent of their cases are moved to criminal court and 58 percent of African American youth are sent to adult prisons.

6. As the number of women incarcerated has increased by 800 percentover the last three decades, women of color have been disproportionately represented. While the number of women incarcerated is relatively low, the racial and ethnic disparities are startling. African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated, while Hispanic women are 69 percent more likely than white women to be incarcerated.

7. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses.According to the Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise 14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:24 PM   #118
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Yup life for the Black man is so much better now right Wags.


How about you answer your own question Wags. When was the zenith of America.

Please tell me we have not reached it yet so I can rest my case that you are a government shill.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:29 PM   #119
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1. While people of color make up about 30 percent of the United States’ population, they account for 60 percent of those imprisoned. The prison population grew by 700 percent from 1970 to 2005, a rate that is outpacing crime and population rates. The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.

2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately three times more likely to be searchedduring a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.

3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than 70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics one-fifth of confined youth today.

4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that 96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than 70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.

5. African American youth have higher rates of juvenile incarceration and are more likely to be sentenced to adult prison. According to the Sentencing Project, even though African American juvenile youth are about 16 percent of the youth population, 37 percent of their cases are moved to criminal court and 58 percent of African American youth are sent to adult prisons.

6. As the number of women incarcerated has increased by 800 percentover the last three decades, women of color have been disproportionately represented. While the number of women incarcerated is relatively low, the racial and ethnic disparities are startling. African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated, while Hispanic women are 69 percent more likely than white women to be incarcerated.

7. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses.According to the Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise 14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.
All this proves is that we got more to go when it comes to racism in this country,damn,you're ignorant.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:30 PM   #120
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Never said it was without problems. I said it was the best of times for the greater number of people.
Yeah,whites.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:33 PM   #121
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Things are swell and the future is rosy.


he Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) announced this morning that based on its monthly survey of establishments, in March 2013 on a seasonally adjusted basis:
U.S. employers added 88,000 non-farm jobs versus the 200,000 that were expected per the monthly WSJ survey of economists; this figure compares to February’s upward adjusted increase of 268,000 non-farm jobs (previously 236,000) and to January’s upward adjusted increase of 148,000 (previously 119,000).
The BLS unemployment rate declined to 7.6% from February’s rate of 7.7%.
There are now 11.7 million unemployed workers, based on BLS’s separate monthly survey of businesses.
However, as we note each month, BLS’s figures do not reflect Real Unemployment, since:
BLS counts only those workers who are actively looking for employment, which can vary fairly widely month-to-month due to workers voluntarily removing themselves from the labor force.
BLS does not include in the civilian labor force “marginally attached workers” (currently 2.3 mm workers) who, while wanting and available for jobs, have not searched for work in the past four weeks but have searched for work in the past 12 months. Included among marginally attached workers are 0.8 million “discouraged workers” who did not look for work specifically because “they believe there are no jobs available or none for which they would qualify.”
BLS does not include among unemployed workers the 10.0 million workers in total who are marginally attached or “part-time-of-necessity” (i.e., the so-called “underemployed” who are unable to find full-time jobs or who’ve had their hours cut back; now 7.6 mm workers).
In contrast, the Summary of Real Unemployment Numbers makes these adjustments to the civilian labor force and BLS’s determination of unemployed workers, and calculates the number of Real Unemployed Workers. In March 2013:
The number of Real Unemployed Workers decreased by 902,000 to 21.7 million (i.e., the 11.7 mm BLS Unemployed Workers plus the 10.0 mm workers who are marginally attached or part-time-of-necessity.
The Real Unemployment Rate declined by 0.5% to 13.8%.
Note #1: Since February 2010, when the number of Real Unemployed Workers was at its highest at 26.5 million, the number of Real Unemployed Workers has declined by 4.8 million workers despite the adjusted civilian labor force now being 1.1 million workers larger.
Note #2: In addition to the current 21.7 million Real Unemployed Workers, there are another 4.1 million workers who, while also saying they want jobs, have not looked for one in the past 12 months – if they are included, March’s Real Unemployment Rate of 13.8% increases to 16.0%.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:34 PM   #122
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Yup life for the Black man is so much better now right Wags.
Ask blacks if they'd prefer a return to segregation, which was rampant in 1952.

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How about you answer your own question Wags. When was the zenith of America.
"Was"? Nope. Today.

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Please tell me we have not reached it yet so I can rest my case that you are a government shill.
You're an insane paranoid racist putrid ****.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:35 PM   #123
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baja is just mad that he and his kind don't run the entire show - as his God intended.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:37 PM   #124
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All this proves is that we got more to go when it comes to racism in this country,damn,you're ignorant.

You think things are better for other groups.


There is one group doing well in todays America and they make up less that 1 % of the population. You think the problem is racism and you call me ignorant. Dude I hardly even know what to say to you.
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Old 05-18-2013, 07:39 PM   #125
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baja is just mad that he and his kind don't run the entire show - as his God intended.

So I'm white now, I better go tell my mother about this she will be very surprised to learn this.
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