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Old 05-15-2011, 08:37 PM   #1
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Default Classical Music Thread

Was wondering if there are any other classical music nerds in here like myself. What styles/preferences do you go and what composers specifically. If favorites and non-favorites in every genre of classical music… obviously Bach, Mozart and Beethoven’s were the harmonious stuff which led into other periods of tonality… I’m also a sucker for rapid, complex piano – especially Rachmaninov. But I’ve really been expanding my musical preference into some of the more atonal stuff, because it really is remarkable when you consider the possibility of chord progressions – why does it always have to be tonal – there are infinite combinations of semi-tonal and atonal composition structure…

It all started with Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring”


I thought I would share some of my other lesser-known favorites:

Arnold Schoenberg:


Sofija Asgatovna Gubajdulina:


Brian Ferneyhough:


Zoe Keating (composer and cellist):
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Old 05-15-2011, 08:39 PM   #2
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The more tonal Phillip Glass:

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Old 05-15-2011, 11:09 PM   #3
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Great thread idea! Can't say I'm a "nerd" per say, but I do love classical music. I've heard my dad talking about the atonal/tonal discussion before, but haven't ever delved into the subject. Thankfully, he always sent me cd's, lists, and recommendations to broaden my horizons, so while I might not KNOW exactly what I'm listening to, it moves me just the same.

Anywho, one of my favorites is Mahler




and of course his 10th was phenomenal, wish he could have finished



A big surprise to me was Beethoven. Don't get me wrong, he's incredible, and I love his music. However, after singing the 9th with the symphony (and in the process really going back and listening to a LOT of his pieces), I can tell you that the repetition in many of his works' gets a bit boring.

I'm a big fan of the russians as well...Bordin, Mussorgsky, Stravinsky, and Rachmaninoff are my favorites.



and I'll always love Copland. I swear, when I die, fanfare for the common man is going to be playing during my casket lowering, and Hoedown is gonna be blaring when everybody is walking out
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:36 AM   #4
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Will post some later. Big fan of more modern stuff like Holst, Gershwin, Copland, Glass and others.

Technically classical stops after 1800.
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightysmurf View Post
>> But I’ve really been expanding my musical preference into some of the more atonal stuff, because it really is remarkable when you consider the possibility of chord progressions – why does it always have to be tonal – there are infinite combinations of semi-tonal and atonal composition structure…
Coincidence - Schoenberg's "Suite for Piano," "Variations for Orchestra," and "Moses und Aaron" are in the CD player on the night stand as we speak.

I've been exploring serialism and 12 tone music to see what applications, if any, there may be for folks like myself who work primarily in the jazz idiom.

And speaking of Stravinsky, his "Firebird" is a great source from which to steal diminished and whole tone ideas.
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:54 AM   #6
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Another fave is violinist Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) - his phrasing is out of this world...

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Old 05-16-2011, 11:18 AM   #7
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Default French Baroque.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i23i0IS8m6U
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:57 AM   #8
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Don't know why, but I'm having trouble posting youtube videos these days....

Anyway, give this one a shot -- Paganini's the bomb!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaxHZxvmSwQ
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:58 AM   #9
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I started love of classical music as a young man with such popular warhorses as The Nutcraker and Swan Lake, and later when music snobs made fun of my limited choices, expanded to Beethoven, Mozart, Sebelius, Copland etc. In my new up snob status, I pretty much ignored my early favorites until last year when TV surfing and caught PBS showing the made for TV movie of the Swan Lake ballet. I had never before seriously watched ballet but I thought I'd watch for the music.

Well, instant love. My early appreciation for the Swan Lake score was renewed and I became mesmerized by the beauty and the athleticism of the dancers, especially the principal ballerina, Gillian Murphy. I have since bought many ballet DVDs including, of course, the Swan Lake presentation by PBS and have watched dozens of youtubes of Murphy.

For me, ballet is a whole new world to discover. I would seriously recommend you music lovers buy the American Ballet Theater made for TV DVD of Swan Lake.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom G View Post
I started love of classical music as a young man with such popular warhorses as The Nutcraker and Swan Lake, and later when music snobs made fun of my limited choices, expanded to Beethoven, Mozart, Sebelius, Copland etc. In my new up snob status, I pretty much ignored my early favorites until last year when TV surfing and caught PBS showing the made for TV movie of the Swan Lake ballet. I had never before seriously watched ballet but I thought I'd watch for the music.

Well, instant love. My early appreciation for the Swan Lake score was renewed and I became mesmerized by the beauty and the athleticism of the dancers, especially the principal ballerina, Gillian Murphy. I have since bought many ballet DVDs including, of course, the Swan Lake presentation by PBS and have watched dozens of youtubes of Murphy.

For me, ballet is a whole new world to discover. I would seriously recommend you music lovers buy the American Ballet Theater made for TV DVD of Swan Lake.
There are a number of really awesome ballets other than just the nutcracker. For example, Rite of Spring was initially a ballet. Another good one was one I saw when I was in St. Petersburg... I'll get the name because I don't have it now, but it was a Tchaikovsky ballet.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:15 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by L.A. BRONCOS FAN View Post
Coincidence - Schoenberg's "Suite for Piano," "Variations for Orchestra," and "Moses und Aaron" are in the CD player on the night stand as we speak.

I've been exploring serialism and 12 tone music to see what applications, if any, there may be for folks like myself who work primarily in the jazz idiom.

And speaking of Stravinsky, his "Firebird" is a great source from which to steal diminished and whole tone ideas.
Do they use 12-tone in jazz? I'm pretty amazed at how Schoenberg is able to take something like 12-tone serial composition and make it sound pleasant in an orchestra. Most people don't even realize that they're hearing chord combinations that they've never heard before - unlike most Baroque/Classical and most Romantic music that is purely tonal.

I actually studied some music theory at DU under Schoenberg's niece - he was a brilliant, brilliant composer.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:47 PM   #12
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I have to credit my interest to a very good primary school music teacher.

There is no more relaxing music for me.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:53 PM   #13
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I love Gabriel Faure's Pavanne and requiem paradiso. Beethoven (especially the 7th allegretto), Mozart, Barber's adagio, Handel's Sarabande, Bach, etc.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:14 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
I have to credit my interest to a very good primary school music teacher.

There is no more relaxing music for me.
Relaxing?


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Old 05-16-2011, 02:19 PM   #15
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Quote:
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I love Gabriel Faure's Pavanne and requiem paradiso. Beethoven (especially the 7th allegretto), Mozart, Barber's adagio, Handel's Sarabande, Bach, etc.
I hope to play Bach's Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring played at my wedding:




Along with Mendelssohn's Wedding March from A Midsummer Night
s Dream, as well as Pachelbells Canon in D ... I'm undecided about Wagner... I know Wagner's "Bridal Chorus" is played at just about every wedding, but I'm a little uneasy about playing Hitler's favorite composer.

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Old 05-16-2011, 02:31 PM   #16
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Who doesn't like Beeth-Oven?

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Old 05-16-2011, 02:39 PM   #17
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With classical music, the proper recording can make a world of difference. You mentioned the "Rite of Spring," and one of my favorite recordings is:
Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring / Alexander Scriabin: The Poem of Ecstasy - Valery Gergiev / Kirov Orchestra
There's nothing like an actual Russian doing Stravinsky.

Also, if you like Bach's Cello Suites, check out:
Bach: Cello Suites by Beschi and Paolo
It's one of the most passionate, in your face, classical recordings I own. It was actually recorded in a 17th century Italian Villa and when the work gets daunting, you can hear his breaths and his body working hard (through the beautiful music). I highly recommend.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:56 PM   #18
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Thanks for this thread. Great suggestions!
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Old 05-16-2011, 03:03 PM   #19
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some very conjuring imagery in this one
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Old 05-16-2011, 03:05 PM   #20
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And ps Tom G that piece is from a wonderful opera ballet called Mlada, check it out!
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Old 05-16-2011, 03:25 PM   #21
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Philip Glass is fantastic. Satyagraha is one of the few Operas I enjoy.
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Old 05-16-2011, 04:58 PM   #22
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Do they use 12-tone in jazz? I'm pretty amazed at how Schoenberg is able to take something like 12-tone serial composition and make it sound pleasant in an orchestra. Most people don't even realize that they're hearing chord combinations that they've never heard before - unlike most Baroque/Classical and most Romantic music that is purely tonal.

I actually studied some music theory at DU under Schoenberg's niece - he was a brilliant, brilliant composer.
A few jazz composers, viz., Bill Evans, Yusef Lateef, Eric Dolphy, et al, have experimented with 12 tone rows.

Some of Schoenberg's compositional devices can be applied to improvisation, e.g., taking an improvised motif or line, playing it in retrograde, then in inversion, followed by retrograde inversion, etc.

Serialism follows strict rules, whereas chromaticism (the basis for a lot of jazz harmony) is somewhat freer inasmuch as it's still tonal music - it's just that tonal centers can shift at any time.
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:54 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A. BRONCOS FAN View Post
A few jazz composers, viz., Bill Evans, Yusef Lateef, Eric Dolphy, et al, have experimented with 12 tone rows.

Some of Schoenberg's compositional devices can be applied to improvisation, e.g., taking an improvised motif or line, playing it in retrograde, then in inversion, followed by retrograde inversion, etc.

Serialism follows strict rules, whereas chromaticism (the basis for a lot of jazz harmony) is somewhat freer inasmuch as it's still tonal music - it's just that tonal centers can shift at any time.
I love Jazz. I think it is impossible to understand the more intricate interpretations of jazz without listening to classical. The overlap is not hard wired like blues to jazz but some pretty interesting musical discoveries can be found. I liked some of the popular musing uncovered by Chic Corea.

Bill Evans was amazing.
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:00 PM   #24
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Quote:
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I have to credit my interest to a very good primary school music teacher.

There is no more relaxing music for me.
I actually find some jazz quite a bit more relaxing and some Classical can be extremely stimulating.

I had to discover classical on my own so my lack of knowledge in this is staggering.
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Old 05-17-2011, 11:09 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A. BRONCOS FAN View Post
A few jazz composers, viz., Bill Evans, Yusef Lateef, Eric Dolphy, et al, have experimented with 12 tone rows.

Some of Schoenberg's compositional devices can be applied to improvisation, e.g., taking an improvised motif or line, playing it in retrograde, then in inversion, followed by retrograde inversion, etc.

Serialism follows strict rules, whereas chromaticism (the basis for a lot of jazz harmony) is somewhat freer inasmuch as it's still tonal music - it's just that tonal centers can shift at any time.
So I googled serial Jazz music... I have to say, I think I like it a little better than some of the classical music of the same structure. 12-tone serialism seems to sound better on guitar than piano...

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