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Old 02-25-2013, 09:47 AM   #1
NickStixx
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Default Any Electrical Engineers?

I am going to hopefully start taking classes this fall in Electronics Engineering Technology and I was just hoping that somebody on here that is maybe in that field or a similar field could give me some advice. I might be able to get a job while going to school at a company here in AZ called Freescale. It's a nationwide company I know, but they have a big manufacturing plant here in Chandler, AZ. I am hoping to get that job, start my studies at a community college, and hopefully move onto ASU for my bachelors.
I took a break from school after doing 1 year of general studies at a community college, and am currently 24 years old. So it has been some time since I've done any math or what not. So I feel like it could be a daunting task, but I am up to the challenge, and engineers that I have already spoken with have said that it is all just a matter of determination to get through the schooling.
So if anyone has anything that they would like to share, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks!
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Old 02-25-2013, 09:51 AM   #2
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:02 AM   #3
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Make sure you get a degree from an accredited program. Most of those CC "Engineering Technology" degrees are not real engineering degrees. You will need a degree from an accredited program if you want to go anywhere in the industry or get your PE license.

I saw you mention the BS from ASU - just make sure you follow it through to the end if you get started.
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:08 AM   #4
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Make sure you get a degree from an accredited program. Most of those CC "Engineering Technology" degrees are not real engineering degrees. You will need a degree from an accredited program if you want to go anywhere in the industry or get your PE license.

I saw you mention the BS from ASU - just make sure you follow it through to the end if you get started.
Yeah I plan to meet with the community college here to ask if it is an accredited program, so that I can be an engineering tech after I get my AAS. Then I will continue education as I work through ASU. I have a friend that works for Intel and one that works for Freescale and they are getting me information as well.

Are you an engineer yourself?
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:35 AM   #5
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I can not stress this enough... make sure your math and physics skills are polished for the EE study. Who knows, you might be the next Ohm, Faraday or Edison
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:36 AM   #6
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Make sure you get a degree from an accredited program. Most of those CC "Engineering Technology" degrees are not real engineering degrees. You will need a degree from an accredited program if you want to go anywhere in the industry or get your PE license.

I saw you mention the BS from ASU - just make sure you follow it through to the end if you get started.
The AA degrees aren't accredited. He'll need at least a 4-year BS, but most state community colleges fully transfer to state schools.

For example, here in Colorado, Arapahoe Community College and Red Rocks Community College actually have degree programs with the same common core curricula at CU-Boulder. So after you've gotten your AS from ACC, the next year you're at CU-Boulder and you wouldn't have skipped a step... it's like spend your freshman and sophomore years at community college, and your junior and senior years at a state university.
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:37 AM   #7
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So I would just say, make sure every class you're taking at CC is transferable to ASU.
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:40 AM   #8
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Make sure you talk to ASU to ensure that the credits you expect to transfer toward your BS actually will.

I'm a mechanical engineer at a company that does a lot of manufacturing, and they have quite a few engineering techs here.
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:44 AM   #9
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The AA degrees aren't accredited. He'll need at least a 4-year BS, but most state community colleges fully transfer to state schools.

For example, here in Colorado, Arapahoe Community College and Red Rocks Community College actually have degree programs with the same common core curricula at CU-Boulder. So after you've gotten your AS from ACC, the next year you're at CU-Boulder and you wouldn't have skipped a step... it's like spend your freshman and sophomore years at community college, and your junior and senior years at a state university.
Yeah I have looked into it and I believe that is how it is set up here with Mesa Community College and ASU. Thank you so much for the good input. Are you an engineer yourself? Did you go through that same process?

I am also hoping that I can do most of my general studies online. I know that even Math classes given online these days are almost more beneficial than in person. Would you have any input on that? If you did go through it, did they have you working on machines and components in the Community College program? I have tried watching some videos, but I'm not sure if different state/schools programs differ much in their teaching.
So is it hands on much in the first couple years or not?

Thanks!
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:46 AM   #10
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I can not stress this enough... make sure your math and physics skills are polished for the EE study. Who knows, you might be the next Ohm, Faraday or Edison
Haha will do! Thanks for the encouragement!
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:52 AM   #11
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Make sure you talk to ASU to ensure that the credits you expect to transfer toward your BS actually will.

I'm a mechanical engineer at a company that does a lot of manufacturing, and they have quite a few engineering techs here.
Very cool, I plan on moving up to a tech, then an engineer. I know that it will take a little longer to get there as I will be working while going to school, but I think it's advantageous to get my foot in the door with a company and move up through them.

My connection at Freescale said the initial position I could have is someone that runs tools or parts to engineers thorughout the plant. I don't know the exact details, but just getting that start would be wonderful either way.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:02 AM   #12
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Good for you! EE is a great degree to have. AZ schools are set up pretty well to transfer CC credits to ASU (different degree, but I did Glendale CC to ASU without losing any credits), so I can't see that being a problem for you with Mesa CC.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:22 AM   #13
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Good for you! EE is a great degree to have. AZ schools are set up pretty well to transfer CC credits to ASU (different degree, but I did Glendale CC to ASU without losing any credits), so I can't see that being a problem for you with Mesa CC.
Thanks! I'm excited to get this all started. I just hope that I have the intellect to make it. But I know if I just focus and work hard enough that I will get it.
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:18 PM   #14
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Thanks! I'm excited to get this all started. I just hope that I have the intellect to make it. But I know if I just focus and work hard enough that I will get it.
My dad's an engineer, and when I was considering it, his advice was, "make sure you have at least a year of advanced mathematics before you even start taking engineering courses."
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:33 PM   #15
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I went the juco route and was able to dual enroll at my state school and the juco school. All credits were seemless.
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:35 PM   #16
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My dad's an engineer, and when I was considering it, his advice was, "make sure you have at least a year of advanced mathematics before you even start taking engineering courses."
Yeah and I think that is what the CC program will help with. I think it's heavily math based at the beginning, and then you start taking more of the actual Engineering courses. I'm sure that is good advice though. So thanks!
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:51 PM   #17
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I started out as an aerospace engineering major and changed majors a couple of times before taking 2 years off. I finally went back and got my BS in mechanical engineering when I was 27. I had taken all of my math through calc 3 and differential equations before that 2 year break. The semester before I went back I took calc 2, 3 and DiffEq at a CC to make sure I wasn't going to be rusty. That was probably the smartest thing I did in preparing for a return. I doubt that helps you much other than showing that having your advanced math courses mastered before getting into your core coursework will certainly help. Good luck and know what you're getting in to. It'll be very difficult at times but if it's really what you want to do you'll find your way through it.
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:54 PM   #18
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:54 PM   #19
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Very cool, I plan on moving up to a tech, then an engineer. I know that it will take a little longer to get there as I will be working while going to school, but I think it's advantageous to get my foot in the door with a company and move up through them.

My connection at Freescale said the initial position I could have is someone that runs tools or parts to engineers thorughout the plant. I don't know the exact details, but just getting that start would be wonderful either way.
understand the difference between a full blown engineering degree and an engineering technology degree.

Tech degrees are more hands on stuff, which is great. Engineering degrees are more theoretical and hence you will need more calculus.

Regardless, a tech degree is a 4 year degree in it's own right. if you want to end up as an engineer, do that directly. unless, the tech degree you are talking about is the 2 year JuCo thing, which, as long as everything transfers over, should be just fine.

first two years of most engineering curriculum are are all math/pre-req's anyways. might as well blast them out at the local CC.
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:22 PM   #20
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I'm an EE. You can do whatever you put your mind to.
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:27 PM   #21
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I got my BS in Electrical Engineering two years ago. I was at a University the entire time, so I'm not sure how community college's curriculums differ.

It's not that bad. I'm assuming you were good at math, leading you in the engineering direction in the first place. If you have not yet taken Calculus, it is really not as difficult as most perceive. Calc II (integrals) is the most difficult, Calc I (derivatives) is second, and Calc III is the easiest (just applying what you learned in I and II to word problems). I would rank them that way in importance as well (integrals are by far used the most, with some derivatives sprinkled in). Differential equations (DiffEQ) was a waste of time for me, but was a prerequisite anyway.

Engineering isn't hard if you put the time into it. Being older, you have probably experienced what a 40 hour work week involves. Most of the kids entering the program are used to spending 2-3 hours/week on homework from high school, and are surprised/fail when they need to spend 15-20 hours/week on homework to get good grades.

I have no idea how an 'engineering technologist' has any idea of hands-on material if it only requires a 2-year degree. Most of the 'labs' (i.e., building circuits, using oscilloscopes and multimeters, etc.) don't start until junior year.
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:28 PM   #22
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I am encouraged to hear that kids these days are still interested in Engineering!

You should read Gene Kranz's book "Failure is not an Option" if it is not already required reading. It will teach you how to be a better Project Manager as well as a better Engineer!

Good luck and stick it out!
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:33 PM   #23
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Old 02-25-2013, 03:00 PM   #24
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Thank you all for the advice (besides Rother8 and Requiem) I really appreciate it!
I know it's going to be difficult at times, but I know that I want to do this. It has been quite sometime since I have been in a math class, so I am sure I will need to brush up and learn some new stuff before I get into the full swing of things. But after that I know I will enjoy it.
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Old 02-25-2013, 03:02 PM   #25
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Very cool, I plan on moving up to a tech, then an engineer. I know that it will take a little longer to get there as I will be working while going to school, but I think it's advantageous to get my foot in the door with a company and move up through them.

My connection at Freescale said the initial position I could have is someone that runs tools or parts to engineers thorughout the plant. I don't know the exact details, but just getting that start would be wonderful either way.
Moving up through a company sounds good, but know this: the best way to increase your salary/responsibilities/etc. as an engineer is to switch companies as often as possible.

Not joking.
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