The Orange Mane -  a Denver Broncos Fan Community  

Go Back   The Orange Mane - a Denver Broncos Fan Community > Orange Mane Discussion > Orange Mane Central Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Chat Room Mark Forums Read



View Poll Results: Do you want your son to play?
Yes, I want him/them to play 51 56.67%
No, I don't want him/them to play 39 43.33%
Voters: 90. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-03-2012, 02:18 PM   #1
Bronco_Beerslug
Angling in the Deep
 
Bronco_Beerslug's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Texas Riviera, Southern Mountains
Posts: 24,234
Default Do You Want Your Son(s) To Play Football?

My son played 3 years in HS and I never really though about him getting seriously hurt during those years although he did suffer a lower back injury that bothers him from time to time today.

In light of Kurt Warner's statement that he prefer his sons do not play the game, I was wondering what the sentiment here was.

There is no doubt that football players are getting so much bigger, stronger and faster at a younger and younger age that there is a real question about how dangerous the game is becoming/has become.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kurt Warner would prefer his sons not play football
Michael David Smith on May 3, 2012, 10:14 AM EDT

Yesterday’s two big stories in the NFL, the suspensions of four Saints for their roles in the team’s bounty program and the suicide of Junior Seau, have one future Hall of Famer wondering if playing football is worth it.



Kurt Warner said on the Dan Patrick Show that the idea of his sons playing football “scares me,” and he thinks the risk of injuries is serious enough that his preference would be that his boys not play.

“They both have the dream, like dad, to play in the NFL,” Warner said. “That’s their goal. And when you hear things like the bounties, when you know certain things having played the game, and then obviously when you understand the size, the speed, the violence of the game, and then you couple that with situations like Junior Seau — was that a ramification of all the years playing? And things that go with that. It scares me as a dad. I just wonder — I wonder what the league’s going to be like. I love that the commissioner is doing a lot of things to try to clean up the game from that standpoint and improve player safety, which helps, in my mind, a lot. But it’s a scary thing for me.”

Asked if he would prefer that his sons not play football, Warner answered, “Yes, I would. Can’t make that choice for them if they want to, but there’s no question in my mind.”

If a man who loves football as much as Warner does would prefer his sons not play, there are probably millions of Americans thinking the same thing. This is a serious problem facing the game of football.
Bronco_Beerslug is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 05-03-2012, 02:20 PM   #2
baja
Happy camper
 
baja's Avatar
 
Sweet

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 60,022

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Ware
Default

no, I wouldn't want him to be a gladiator either
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:25 PM   #3
jhat01
Ring of Famer
 
jhat01's Avatar
 
Knuckle Dragging Homer

Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: West River
Posts: 1,860

Adopt-a-Bronco:
ManRam
Default

I have a 3 year old boy, and up until now I was all for it (if we wants to). This stuff with the CTE and concussions does make me think though. I'll still probably let him play, but I might try to steer him towards baseball.
jhat01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:33 PM   #4
cmhargrove
Is this thing on???
 
cmhargrove's Avatar
 
Travis Henry's love child...

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 6,727

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Peyton Hillis
Default

Sure the rules change when you become the parent - you worry about your kids all the time. But, what you gonna do - teach them to be nancies that are afraid to get hurt?

You can get hurt doing anything these days. I know as many kids that tear their ACL playing soccer and basketball - its not just football. The equipment just gets better and better, and several brands of helmets are actually hooked into computers to measure concussive forces.

Bottom line is, if your son is an athlete, why would you want to hold him back from reaching his potential in any sport? I don't care if it is badminton, bowling, track, or wrestling. To teach any less is a poor example for a father to teach, IMO. Teach your kid to love what he is doing, try to be his absolute best, and do everything in his power to be the fastest, biggest, strongest, and most skilled. There is a life lesson there that lasts long after their playing career.

I'll take a bum knee at age 50 rather than being a fat ass diabetic anyday. As my great grandmother used to say (she lived to over 110 years old) - "It's better to wear out than to rust out."
cmhargrove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:35 PM   #5
snowspot66
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 4,814
Default

I don't see youth leagues as much of an issue. Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury. I got completely leveled by blind side cheap shots a couple of times and no headache, dizziness, or anything. Hell I was on my feet faster than the kid that hit me. It was like when Dumervil leveled Brady. He just popped right back up as if it didn't happen.

When you start getting into college that's when I might have problems. Not worth it unless you're getting a free ride in my opinion.
snowspot66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:41 PM   #6
manchambo
Ring of Famer
 
manchambo's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,392
Default

It's a tough question to answer. Certainly something I enjoyed thoroughly for several years. I tend to think the dangers of playing into high school are less than playing in the NFL, but it's hard to be sure. And what if they did turn out good enough to play in college or the NFL? I'm not sure the cost is worth it at this point, but I don't know how you could convince them not to do it (no one could have convinced me).
manchambo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:45 PM   #7
CPA
Rookie
 

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 98
Default

I had two sons play, both from the age 4 through 6th grade in a local youth league. I don't regret it.

I also served in various positions in that league including two years as the President. The league works closely with it's hired EMS squad and has worked in conjunction with USA Football (the NFL's youth arm), the league's insurance company and local doctors to put together procedures to help reduce injury, as well as dealing with inevitable injuries. The one thing the league can't do is insure that 100% of kids that sustain a concussion don't play, because, well, parents aren't always honest. For those that the league knows have had concussions, a release from the doctor is now required.

The league is doing something right because it's one of the largest non-affiliated, non-select team leagues in the state of Texas with over 1700 players.
CPA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:45 PM   #8
Bronco_Beerslug
Angling in the Deep
 
Bronco_Beerslug's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Texas Riviera, Southern Mountains
Posts: 24,234
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowspot66 View Post
I don't see youth leagues as much of an issue. Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury. I got completely leveled by blind side cheap shots a couple of times and no headache, dizziness, or anything. Hell I was on my feet faster than the kid that hit me. It was like when Dumervil leveled Brady. He just popped right back up as if it didn't happen.

When you start getting into college that's when I might have problems. Not worth it unless you're getting a free ride in my opinion.
I don't know about that after reading some of the stuff below..

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
'Catastrophic' Head Injuries to High School Football Players Rising
Annual report found fewer deaths but more cases of permanent brain damage
URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/n...ry_124327.html (*this news item will not be available after 07/19/2012)

Friday, April 20, 2012

FRIDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- High school and youth football players sustained 14 brain injuries with long-lasting damage in 2011 -- the highest number in more than 25 years -- and this is a "major problem," a new report claims.

The finding is based on an annual survey, conducted by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, which collects data on catastrophic football injuries.

Although deaths from brain injuries among high school players have decreased every decade, from 128 in the 1960s to 32 in the 2000s, brain injuries with incomplete recovery reached the double digits in three of the past four years.

CONT...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
High School, College Football Comes With Risk
By Jeffrey Perkel

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- With the school football season just around the corner, a new study is raising awareness of the risks associated with playing the game.

Researchers found that college football players get injured more often than their high school counterparts, but high school athletes are more likely to end up severely injured.

The new findings also point to "where the focus should be in terms of prevention," said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, medical director of the Institute for Sports Medicine at Children's Memorial Hospital, in Chicago. She was not involved in the study, which is published in the August issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

A second report on youth sports injuries was also released Thursday, this time by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That study, published in this week's issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that boys aged 10 to 14 were most likely to end up in the nation's emergency departments with a traumatic brain injury, and that activities such as bicycling, horseback riding, football, basketball and use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) were most often to blame.

The football study was led by R. Dawn Comstock, a primary investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Her team collected injury reports for the 2005-2006 football season from 100 high schools and 55 colleges across the country via two Internet-based systems -- the High School Reporting Information Online (RIO) and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System, respectively.

Based on almost 1,900 injury reports submitted to the RIO, the researchers estimate there were 517,726 football-related injuries during the 2005-2006 season at the high school level across the United States. The NCAA system logged more than 3,500 injuries in its database during the same period.

Not unexpectedly, college players were about twice as likely to injure themselves as high school students, Comstock said, suffering 8.6 injuries per 1,000 "athlete-exposures" (a practice or competition), compared with high school athletes' 4.36 injuries/1,000.

But the researcher said she was surprised to find that the distribution of injuries differed, with fractures, concussions, and season-ending injuries more common among high school athletes.

CONT...
Bronco_Beerslug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:46 PM   #9
Requiem
~~~
 
Requiem's Avatar
 
~ ~ ~

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Earth Division
Posts: 23,847

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Princes of Tara
Default

If I ever have a son, I will support him in whatever sporting endeavor he chooses. Even male cheerleading. WOO.
Requiem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:48 PM   #10
Dr. Broncenstein
Ring of Famer
 
Dr. Broncenstein's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Sterile Fields
Posts: 13,661

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Trey Gowdy
Default

I'd rather he want to play golf. But if he really wants to play football, his mother is going to be the hurdle.
Dr. Broncenstein is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:48 PM   #11
OBF1
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 15,655

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Marvin Austin
Default

Easy for the white guys to say yes... Like they will ever have a chance of going professional
OBF1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:50 PM   #12
oubronco
John Foneco !!
 
oubronco's Avatar
 
Mile High Magic

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Sooner Country
Posts: 20,344
Default

I'd really like for my son to get a scholarship for College Bass Fishing
oubronco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:50 PM   #13
TerrElway
Pro Bowler
 

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 592
Default

Interesting discussion in the 3 o'clock hour on KFAN in SLC- Vai Sikahema (former player now broadcaster in Philly) talking football.

Talk turned to the head injuries and the suicides and injuries etc. and the host made the comment that he never thought he would do this but he and his wife have actually talked about whether their kid should play FB.

I have to say, I have had some of the same thoughts lately.

I LOVE football. It's my favorite sport and to be honest, some of the appeal is the physicality and violence of the game. I love the strategy as well but I love the toughness and grit it takes to play the game. I played and played through injury (20 years ago it was "rub dirt on it and get back in there") and later was told by a Dr. that the stingers I kept getting were really close to screwing me up good for life. And that was just at the HS varsity level. I can barely imagine playing at the collegiate or pro level.

I coach youth ball now and have to the last 7 years (10 years total). This is my last year coaching as my son is going into the 9th grade and this is the last year he can play WFFL. I see so many cavemen coaching the kids and not caring about injury and celebrating injury etc. etc. that it has sullied the game for me some. I don't think there is any place for it with young kids. Not purposefully trying to hurt but it is rampant and it is done in the name of toughness and winning. That said, you have to play the game with an edge and we try to coach that and bring that out.

But with all the new info on the head injuries and everything else I found myself saying to my wife just last night,"If Nick said he didn't want to play HS ball I probably wouldn't try to change his mind." I never thought I would say that about my favorite sport but my kid's health is of more concern to me than trying to recapture old glory through his exploits on the field.

Do I need to get my testosterone level checked?
TerrElway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:52 PM   #14
Kaylore
Because I am better
 
Kaylore's Avatar
 
Taysom Hill for Heisman!

Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ceti Alpha V
Posts: 46,478

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Pat Bowlen
Default

If I had a son and they wanted to play football, then I would want them to. I don't "want" them to do anything just because.
Kaylore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:53 PM   #15
lolcopter
Guest
 

Posts: n/a
Default

If they want to...

Last edited by lolcopter; 05-03-2012 at 02:55 PM.. Reason: Dammit kaylore...
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 02:56 PM   #16
Bronco Boy
Avid Ambien Abuser
 
Bronco Boy's Avatar
 
Eric Fischer: Catholic Priest

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New York. **** you too.
Posts: 2,019

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Lamin Barrow
Default

If I had a son and he wanted to do activities that could cause him brain damage like football and drugs then I would let him.
Bronco Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:01 PM   #17
TheReverend
Permanent Facepalm
 
TheReverend's Avatar
 
Not. Too. Shabby.

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 37,368

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Mike Shanahan
Default

Shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit I even want my daughter to play.

She's super tiny and petite but I could teach her to play safe AND wreck mofos playing safety.
TheReverend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:03 PM   #18
Drunk Monkey
Mars b****es!!!
 
Drunk Monkey's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,153
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmhargrove View Post
Sure the rules change when you become the parent - you worry about your kids all the time. But, what you gonna do - teach them to be nancies that are afraid to get hurt?

You can get hurt doing anything these days. I know as many kids that tear their ACL playing soccer and basketball - its not just football. The equipment just gets better and better, and several brands of helmets are actually hooked into computers to measure concussive forces.

Bottom line is, if your son is an athlete, why would you want to hold him back from reaching his potential in any sport? I don't care if it is badminton, bowling, track, or wrestling. To teach any less is a poor example for a father to teach, IMO. Teach your kid to love what he is doing, try to be his absolute best, and do everything in his power to be the fastest, biggest, strongest, and most skilled. There is a life lesson there that lasts long after their playing career.

I'll take a bum knee at age 50 rather than being a fat ass diabetic anyday. As my great grandmother used to say (she lived to over 110 years old) - "It's better to wear out than to rust out."
I have a bum knee at 33 from Football. It sucks.
Drunk Monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:05 PM   #19
razorwire77
Tapenade Swagga
 
razorwire77's Avatar
 
"Not too shabby."

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 4,483

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Bradley Roby
Default

Honestly, it depends on what he wanted to do. If my hypothetical son had a passion for the game and wanted to play in high school I would allow him to do it, assuming his other priorities like school were in check. It would also depend on my son's size and strength. I played 4 years of high school football primary LB/DE at a 4A school and started for three of those years. The only injuries I incurred was one mild concussion, a slightly sprained ankle and a broken pinky. However, I was 6'2" 225 pounds. If my son turns out to be 5'6" and a buck 40, I would be much more hesitant to let him play than if he turns out to be my size.
razorwire77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:10 PM   #20
Ratboy
It's all over...
 
Ratboy's Avatar
 
ಠ_ಠ

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: England
Posts: 15,174
Default

I will push him into all sports early on and let him make his decision as he gets older.
Ratboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:17 PM   #21
Drunk Monkey
Mars b****es!!!
 
Drunk Monkey's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,153
Default

At this point I don't think I would influence him to play football but I would not stand in his way either if he wanted to. If he made that choice I would be as enthusiastic a parent / fan as I could be. Since I love the game I don't think I would have to try very hard.
Drunk Monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:20 PM   #22
manchambo
Ring of Famer
 
manchambo's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,392
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylore View Post
If I had a son and they wanted to play football, then I would want them to. I don't "want" them to do anything just because.
Do you "want" your son not to have head injuries? I think that was the point of the question. And not wanting your son to play football for that reason is not really "just because."
manchambo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:24 PM   #23
Blart
I'm gay for the Broncos!
 
Blart's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,910

Adopt-a-Bronco:
all @ same time
Default

This is how boxing faded away into niche status.

Parents didn't want their sons playing, highschool boxing classes were cancelled from low attendance, and a new generation was born that had no interest in the sport.

The concussion studies were the beginning of the end for football.
Blart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:25 PM   #24
Requiem
~~~
 
Requiem's Avatar
 
~ ~ ~

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Earth Division
Posts: 23,847

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Princes of Tara
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by manchambo View Post
Do you "want" your son not to have head injuries? I think that was the point of the question. And not wanting your son to play football for that reason is not really "just because."
A kid can sustain a serious head injury by pretending to play Ninja Turtles on the monkey bars and jungle gym's at school playgrounds. Lets get real naw.
Requiem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:26 PM   #25
DBroncos4life
Hey pic Mod!?!?! FU
 
DBroncos4life's Avatar
 
Bacon bits

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: The wrong side of right.
Posts: 28,794

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Julius "Fluff"
Default

The odds of my son making it to the NFL might be getting better.
DBroncos4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:45 PM.


Denver Broncos