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Old 05-15-2018, 12:28 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by DomCasual View Post
I don't see any problem, as long as you prepare each stud with a fetzer valve, some 3-in-1 oil, and a few gauze pads.
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Old 05-15-2018, 04:13 PM   #27
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ah ****, I took some pictures but they exceed the Mane file limit, and I am not sure how to rectify that. Thanks for all the responses, I will try to get these uploaded later with my wife's help.
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Old 05-15-2018, 04:16 PM   #28
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trusses, your builder should look into them to save some time and money.
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Old 05-15-2018, 08:13 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DomCasual View Post
I don't see any problem, as long as you prepare each stud with a fetzer valve, some 3-in-1 oil, and a few gauze pads.
Make sure to get the Steinway check valve adapter for that Fetzer valve using the universal constant to set the right setting setting for for the gravity load of the structure. It costs more but it will save you money in the long run. I think the Hammond check valve adapter is used for single family homes not garages, maybe it is the other way around, I can never remember.

Anywho if you get the gravity check valve adapter set right you don't need the gauze pads but I would still oil everything down, including the garage and it's contents once a quarter, but only when the moon is full other wise it will throw a wrench into your universal constant math and settings.

Also don't forget to file down the lips where the Fetzer and Steinway meet or you will waste a weekend trying to get them to go together. I learned that the hard way.

Edit: Take a file and mark the initial Steinway setting into the check valve so you have a reference point for the initial setting should you put an addition on the garage. I used a sharpie but after oiling the garage and it's contents down the 1st 12 times the mark disappeared, it is best to make sure the mark is permanent. You WILL thank me for that tip!

Last edited by broncosteven; 05-15-2018 at 08:19 PM..
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Old 05-16-2018, 05:58 PM   #30
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spoke to the contractor, he said they come back at the end and place some metal strapping to make it very strong, so you can make it storage very easily.

Another question: Does anybody have an expertise/ opinion on Radiant Barrier in the attic? Here's my thought, the summer can get really long and hot here, so a radiant barrier for slowing down heat transfer into the attic makes a lot of sense... but will it be detrimental in the winter when the sun typically warms up structures? The Sun is very low in the sky to the South in winter, so maybe the decreased heat in the summer outweighs solar gain in the winter? anybody used it, its like a foil sheet product, and had any success?
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:37 PM   #31
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I'm in Texas (DFW area) and we have radiant barrier (sheets applied to the plywood, not the paint type) and my attic in the middle of the summer heat is usually no hotter than 118 degrees when I've checked. Does your building also have roof vents and air entry ducts along the soffits so it can suck air in and circulate out the top?


Here's a good page with pics of what happens if you do not block the intake air vents and blow insulation over them.


https://inspectapedia.com/ventilatio...ts_Blocked.php
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:42 AM   #32
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I'm in Texas (DFW area) and we have radiant barrier (sheets applied to the plywood, not the paint type) and my attic in the middle of the summer heat is usually no hotter than 118 degrees when I've checked. Does your building also have roof vents and air entry ducts along the soffits so it can suck air in and circulate out the top?


Here's a good page with pics of what happens if you do not block the intake air vents and blow insulation over them.


https://inspectapedia.com/ventilatio...ts_Blocked.php
I would apply the rolls to staple them it to the roof rafters. I'm bot exactly sure about venting, they are putting the roof on today so I assume there will be roof vents placed, since I have not seen soffit vents.
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:54 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Large View Post
spoke to the contractor, he said they come back at the end and place some metal strapping to make it very strong, so you can make it storage very easily.

Another question: Does anybody have an expertise/ opinion on Radiant Barrier in the attic? Here's my thought, the summer can get really long and hot here, so a radiant barrier for slowing down heat transfer into the attic makes a lot of sense... but will it be detrimental in the winter when the sun typically warms up structures? The Sun is very low in the sky to the South in winter, so maybe the decreased heat in the summer outweighs solar gain in the winter? anybody used it, its like a foil sheet product, and had any success?
I am in Texas (DFW), and I can tell you it makes about a 33% savings on energy. Of course there are many factors, but my sisters house who doesn't have radiant barrier in the hottest months electricity bill runs about $650. My old house about the same size is about $425. Now my new house that is bigger, radiant barrier, double pane windows, 16 seer AC is about $180. I expect the number to go up since I got a pool now. But it is still cheaper than my old house and my sisters house.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:01 AM   #34
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I am in Texas (DFW), and I can tell you it makes about a 33% savings on energy. Of course there are many factors, but my sisters house who doesn't have radiant barrier in the hottest months electricity bill runs about $650. My old house about the same size is about $425. Now my new house that is bigger, radiant barrier, double pane windows, 16 seer AC is about $180. I expect the number to go up since I got a pool now. But it is still cheaper than my old house and my sisters house.
Do you have it on the rafters and floor/on top of the batt insulation?

My old neighbor just had it laying on top of his batt insulation in his attic, and he said it made a huge difference.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:22 AM   #35
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its on the roof.

I have never heard anyone here lay their radiant barrier on the insulation or floor of attic. I didn't know it was possible.

When radiant barrier first came out, people were installing it after the home was built. There was some serious issues as many contractors weren't doing it correctly leaving gaps or not adhering it to the rafter correctly. I was lucky enough as both houses I own was a new construction and the radiant barrier was preinstalled into the plywood used for the roof.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:27 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Large View Post
spoke to the contractor, he said they come back at the end and place some metal strapping to make it very strong, so you can make it storage very easily.

Another question: Does anybody have an expertise/ opinion on Radiant Barrier in the attic? Here's my thought, the summer can get really long and hot here, so a radiant barrier for slowing down heat transfer into the attic makes a lot of sense... but will it be detrimental in the winter when the sun typically warms up structures? The Sun is very low in the sky to the South in winter, so maybe the decreased heat in the summer outweighs solar gain in the winter? anybody used it, its like a foil sheet product, and had any success?
oh yes, the idea of the radiant barrier in the winter is to keep the heat inside the house by reflecting it so as it doesn't escape through the roof.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:05 AM   #37
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its on the roof.

I have never heard anyone here lay their radiant barrier on the insulation or floor of attic. I didn't know it was possible.

When radiant barrier first came out, people were installing it after the home was built. There was some serious issues as many contractors weren't doing it correctly leaving gaps or not adhering it to the rafter correctly. I was lucky enough as both houses I own was a new construction and the radiant barrier was preinstalled into the plywood used for the roof.
Nice. Radiant panels under the sheathing would be much easier than cutting from rolls and stapling.

I wish I had a picture of his attic. I don't know the new neighbors that well. It is just rolled out over top his batt insulation and taped together.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:16 AM   #38
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Nice. Radiant panels under the sheathing would be much easier than cutting from rolls and stapling.

I wish I had a picture of his attic. I don't know the new neighbors that well. It is just rolled out over top his batt insulation and taped together.
, i am horrible talking construction as I don't know the correct terminology. I never heard anyone lay it on the insulation before. I guess its works the same. Another thing I notice builders using are tankless water heaters. My new house has two tankless water heaters and they are great. Never have to worry about the headaches of water heaters again.

One thing I regret with my house is not using foam insulation in the walls. I heard so many great things about it. Lowering energy cost by as much as 70%.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:42 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by SleepingTiger View Post
, i am horrible talking construction as I don't know the correct terminology. I never heard anyone lay it on the insulation before. I guess its works the same. Another thing I notice builders using are tankless water heaters. My new house has two tankless water heaters and they are great. Never have to worry about the headaches of water heaters again.

One thing I regret with my house is not using foam insulation in the walls. I heard so many great things about it. Lowering energy cost by as much as 70%.
Oh, his installation technique definitely could have been better, but he's just a bored retired guy. Lol

Foam insulation in the walls would be great. I would definitely go for that in a new house. Within the last 10 years around here in new construction, exterior walls have to be 2x6 for insulation purposes, but I'm not sure how many people are going with the spray foam.

For existing builds, I've recently seen this super liquidy low expansion spray foam than can be sprayed into wall spaces that have existing batt insulation via a small hole. Otherwise, you'd have to cut slots along the bottom of your drywall, pull the old crap out, patch the slots, drill application holes for the foam, and then patch the holes. ($$$!!!)

When I get my siding redone within the next couple years, I'm going to look into the spray foam and/or Rmax insulating panels which would be installed between the sheathing and siding. I have an older house, and although the windows/doors are pretty decent, I'm losing a ton of heating/AC money through the walls.

I had to replace my water heater just last winter, but it was old when we bought the house, and we knew it needed to be replaced. I got lucky it crapped out on a Friday night, and the company I used had the new one in by noon on Saturday. I thought about going tankless, but I didn't pull the trigger since it would have been a few days before they could have gotten it in, and the old lady was not having that especially with two young sons. Lol Maybe in the future if I can plan for it.

Last edited by WolfpackGuy; 05-17-2018 at 07:55 AM..
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