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Old 08-23-2013, 12:42 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Requiem View Post
I have had six or seven interviews since I moved up, no offers. Most said I was overqualified. It is getting frustrating
So, what does "you're overqualified" really mean?

Have you ever had an employer or recruiter say you're "overqualified" for a job? Honestly, how can you really be "overqualified" for a job? You can either do the job, or you can't. How can having more experience than required be a negative, right?

First, it's important to know that it's a catch-all excuse that hiring managers, recruiters and HR use to politely eliminate you from the candidate pool. Why do they use it? If they said what they were really passing on you for, it would seem silly, petty, or down-right discriminatory. In fact, here are nine most common reasons they are saying it.

1. Your personality isn't a match for the office/department culture.
2. You don't look like you would fit in.
3. You seem like a slow worker.
4. You have too many degrees and/or were paid too much previously.
5. You didn't seem reliable.
6. You acted like a know-it-all in the interview.
7. You didn't seem like you really knew what you were talking about.
8. I don't like you, can't see working with you every day, and I just don't want to be rude.
9. I already have the candidate I want and interviewing you is just a formality.

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/08...-overqualifie/
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Old 08-23-2013, 12:49 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by Pony Boy View Post
So, what does "you're overqualified" really mean?

Have you ever had an employer or recruiter say you're "overqualified" for a job? Honestly, how can you really be "overqualified" for a job? You can either do the job, or you can't. How can having more experience than required be a negative, right?

First, it's important to know that it's a catch-all excuse that hiring managers, recruiters and HR use to politely eliminate you from the candidate pool. Why do they use it? If they said what they were really passing on you for, it would seem silly, petty, or down-right discriminatory. In fact, here are nine most common reasons they are saying it.

1. Your personality isn't a match for the office/department culture.
2. You don't look like you would fit in.
3. You seem like a slow worker.
4. You have too many degrees and/or were paid too much previously.
5. You didn't seem reliable.
6. You acted like a know-it-all in the interview.
7. You didn't seem like you really knew what you were talking about.
8. I don't like you, can't see working with you every day, and I just don't want to be rude.
9. I already have the candidate I want and interviewing you is just a formality.

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/08...-overqualifie/
Actually, as someone who handled HR for several companies over the past 15 years, dealing with interviews, hiring and firing on a daily basis, "overqualified" means exactly what it says.

If someone is overqualified for a job, it means that they are more likely to leave that job for another, and are therefore more of a liability to hire than someone who is adequately qualified for a job.

To put it in simple terms, if you have an 18 year old with no work experience and a 30 year old with 10 years management experience both applying for a minimum wage job at McDonald's, I'm going to hire the 18 year old, because it is more likely that the 30 year old is going to keep searching for (and find) other employment, causing me to have to replace him or her much more quickly than I would the 18 year old.

I would think if you ran a successful business, something as simple as this would come second nature to you and not cause you to go search for an AOL jobs article to poorly support whatever point it is you're trying to make.

I'm waiting for the inevitable influx of guffaws telling me I'm saying that Req applied for a job at McDonald's and about how I popped popcorn at a movie theater instead of, you know, addressing the point.
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Old 08-23-2013, 01:39 PM   #53
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Old 08-23-2013, 01:42 PM   #54
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More recent study:

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Old 08-23-2013, 02:33 PM   #55
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Actually, as someone who handled HR for several companies over the past 15 years, dealing with interviews, hiring and firing on a daily basis, "overqualified" means exactly what it says.
I think you're missing the point the post was more "tongue & cheek" ........ Requiem is not overqualified to be the greeter at Wal-Mart.

I have hired more people than most over the past 40 years and not for other companies but for my own companies. In all those years I never used the term "overqualified" there are more effective and less offensive ways to tell a person they are not what we are looking for to fill the available position.
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Old 08-23-2013, 02:39 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Pony Boy View Post
I think you're missing the point the post was more "tongue & cheek" ........ Requiem is not overqualified to be the greeter at Wal-Mart.

I have hired more people than most over the past 40 years and not for other companies but for my own companies. In all those years I never used the term "overqualified" there are more effective and less offensive ways to tell a person they are not what we are looking for to fill the available position.
Congratulations. I'm glad you clarified such and important and relevant aspect of the discussion. We're truly blessed.
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Old 08-23-2013, 02:41 PM   #57
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I'm waiting for the inevitable influx of guffaws telling me I'm saying that Req applied for a job at McDonald's and about how I popped popcorn at a movie theater instead of, you know, addressing the point.
Nothing wrong with popping popcorn. There's a guy at Century Aurora that does it that's pretty cute.

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Old 08-23-2013, 03:40 PM   #58
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Nothing wrong with popping popcorn. There's a guy at Century Aurora that does it that's pretty cute.

He's probably 16...are you a member of NAMBLA?
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:41 PM   #59
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He's probably 16...are you a member of NAMBLA?
Well older. One of their ushers is an elderly man.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:32 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houghtam View Post
Actually, as someone who handled HR for several companies over the past 15 years, dealing with interviews, hiring and firing on a daily basis, "overqualified" means exactly what it says.

If someone is overqualified for a job, it means that they are more likely to leave that job for another, and are therefore more of a liability to hire than someone who is adequately qualified for a job.

To put it in simple terms, if you have an 18 year old with no work experience and a 30 year old with 10 years management experience both applying for a minimum wage job at McDonald's, I'm going to hire the 18 year old, because it is more likely that the 30 year old is going to keep searching for (and find) other employment, causing me to have to replace him or her much more quickly than I would the 18 year old.

I would think if you ran a successful business, something as simple as this would come second nature to you and not cause you to go search for an AOL jobs article to poorly support whatever point it is you're trying to make.

I'm waiting for the inevitable influx of guffaws telling me I'm saying that Req applied for a job at McDonald's and about how I popped popcorn at a movie theater instead of, you know, addressing the point.
It was Pony's way of trying to piss on me. On my government contract I was told by my supervisor that I was overqualified and deserved more pay than what was being offered. I gladly accepted anyways. It is understandable for a company to pass someone up who is likely to move on anyways. I am honest and upfront with my aims and goals. I would rather places hire a kid to start out and let them make $10 an hour instead of settle and likely move on shortly down the road.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:44 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by Pony Boy View Post
So, what does "you're overqualified" really mean?

Have you ever had an employer or recruiter say you're "overqualified" for a job? Honestly, how can you really be "overqualified" for a job? You can either do the job, or you can't. How can having more experience than required be a negative, right?

First, it's important to know that it's a catch-all excuse that hiring managers, recruiters and HR use to politely eliminate you from the candidate pool. Why do they use it? If they said what they were really passing on you for, it would seem silly, petty, or down-right discriminatory. In fact, here are nine most common reasons they are saying it.

1. Your personality isn't a match for the office/department culture.
2. You don't look like you would fit in.
3. You seem like a slow worker.
4. You have too many degrees and/or were paid too much previously.
5. You didn't seem reliable.
6. You acted like a know-it-all in the interview.
7. You didn't seem like you really knew what you were talking about.
8. I don't like you, can't see working with you every day, and I just don't want to be rude.
9. I already have the candidate I want and interviewing you is just a formality.

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/08...-overqualifie/

As someone who regularly does hiring, the biggest reason I've ever had to say someone is "overqualified" is because... they are overqualified. It doesn't do me any good to hire a senior level developer into a junior level position, because the liklyhood of that senior level person hanging around in a Jr. position any longer than it takes them to find a senior level position is nill.

I have, on occasion, converted a position to a higher level to take on someone I feel would be really good, but only when I could afford to do so.

Last edited by Fedaykin; 08-23-2013 at 04:48 PM..
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:45 PM   #62
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I would rather places hire a kid to start out and let them make $10 an hour instead of settle and likely move on shortly down the road.
So would I, and raising the minimum wage would cut down on that considerably. If someone is making a living wage, regardless their age, they're far less likely to move to another job. It is not as if, just because the minimum wage jumps up, everyone else's wages jump up too

I know it's an age-old widely held belief that raising the minimum wage means everyone's wage needs to go up or else the old employees revolt because they were making X percent above minimum and now they're making X minus...but it's all bunk.

I've been involved in 4 separate minimum wage hikes with three different companies, and in no instance did upper management adjust the wages of those already making minimum or above. None.

Considering it costs far less to retain an old employee than it does to hire a new one, raising the minimum wage in this instance actually helps employee retention, regardless of what people want to do with those facts.
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:51 AM   #63
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Liberalism is pragmatic and adapts to the future. Conservatism is ideological and lives in the past. A successful society is one in which burdens and benefits are shared. You can't have a viable society based on the dogma of every man for himself. A kindergartner could tell you that.

Oh, and greed is not good, for those who can't seem to figure that out.
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