The Orange Mane -  a Denver Broncos Fan Community  

Go Back   The Orange Mane - a Denver Broncos Fan Community > Jibba Jabba > War, Religion and Politics Thread
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Chat Room Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-10-2013, 05:55 PM   #26
Fedaykin
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,123

Adopt-a-Bronco:
None
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by baja View Post
Fine you eat it.
Nice non reply. I just find it fascinating that you're complaining about organic farming methods.

Feces (everything from bacterial waste and worm poop to human poop) is used all the time in the production of food. It's pretty much 100% impossible to buy farmed food, of any kind, that was not produced, at some point, with the use of feces.

Sounds like you're angling for 100% artificial fertilizers in engineered soil. The only way to get something grown that is definitely not poop based...

Fedaykin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2013, 05:59 PM   #27
Fedaykin
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,123

Adopt-a-Bronco:
None
Default


All those things would be found in pretty much any food product. (obv not certain things that are meat product specific)
Fedaykin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2013, 06:04 PM   #28
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fedaykin View Post
Nice non reply. I just find it fascinating that you're complaining about organic farming methods.

Feces (everything from bacterial waste and worm poop to human poop) is used all the time in the production of food. It's pretty much 100% impossible to buy farmed food, of any kind, that was not produced, at some point, with the use of feces.

Sounds like you're angling for 100% artificial fertilizers in engineered soil. The only way to get something grown that is definitely not poop based...

It's my standard non reply to pompous jack asses such as yourself. It is all you deserve.

Go have a heaping helping of organic heavy metals and other toxic waste.

I'll have my organic certified thank you;

http://www.ccof.org/certification
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2013, 06:12 PM   #29
W*GS
Ring of Famer
 
W*GS's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Earth
Posts: 21,328
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by baja View Post
I'll have my organic certified thank you
Does "organic" mean "poop-free"? It cannot. Ergo, you eat stuff that has had poop on it.

W*GS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 12:27 AM   #30
Fedaykin
Ring of Famer
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,123

Adopt-a-Bronco:
None
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by baja View Post
It's my standard non reply to pompous jack asses such as yourself. It is all you deserve.
Ahh poor baby. I'm sorry that pointing out your inability to engage in critical thinking of any sort hurts your feelings so much.


Quote:
Go have a heaping helping of organic heavy metals and other toxic waste.

I'll have my organic certified thank you;

http://www.ccof.org/certification

Poop is not toxic waste. It's the basis of all agriculture.
Fedaykin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 06:38 AM   #31
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fedaykin View Post
Ahh poor baby. I'm sorry that pointing out your inability to engage in critical thinking of any sort hurts your feelings so much.

You love the term critical thinking but that is not what you are doing. You point out that feces is natures fertilizer but fail to mention in a man made concentrated growing area manure from vegetation eating animals is what is used not people poop. You also fail to acknowledge the lack of regulations in the Chinese agribusiness. If you want to eat food grown in China fine but don't try an convince me it's fine by making the broad statement poop is an organic fertilizer and ignore all the other likely contaminants in their unregulated systems. Critical Thinking you claim



Poop is not toxic waste. It's the basis of all agriculture.

Nobody said manure wasn't an acceptable fertilizer
Bold


If only you were half as smart you you think you are.
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 10:27 AM   #32
Meck77
.
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 16,833
Default

Nestle's CEO pissing and moaning about organic food. He even goes on to say that access to water should not be a public right. Keep in mind Nestle is one of the biggest if not the biggest bottled water companies in the world.

http://www.realfarmacy.com/nestle-ceo-water-right/

So next time you are cruising the isles at the store thinking about stuffing your child with a Nestle's product think of this ahole.

Last edited by Meck77; 08-11-2013 at 10:30 AM..
Meck77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 10:39 AM   #33
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Rural Communities Exploited by Nestle for Your Bottled Water
Across the U.S., rural communities are footing the bill for the booming bottled water industry.
May 29, 2007 |
Across the country, multinational corporations are targeting hundreds of rural communities to gain control of their most precious resource. By strong-arming small towns with limited economic means, these corporations are part of a growing trend to privatize public water supplies for economic gain in the ballooning bottled water industry.

With sales of over $35 billion worldwide in the bottled water market, corporations are doing whatever it takes to buy up pristine springs in some of our country's most beautiful places. While the companies reap the profits, the local communities and the environment are paying the price.

One of the biggest and most voracious of the water gobblers is Nestle, which controls one-third of the U.S. market and sells 70 different brand names -- such as Arrowhead, Calistoga, Deer Park, Perrier, Poland Spring and Ice Mountain -- which it draws from 75 springs located all over the country.

Nestle's latest target is McCloud, located in the shadow of Northern California's snow-capped Mt. Shasta. The town of McCloud has worked hard to try to reinvent itself in recent years. McCloud is a former timber town that is learning how to stand on its own feet again after the lumber companies bottomed out and took off.

http://www.alternet.org/story/52526/..._bottled_water
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 10:42 AM   #34
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Nestlé Sued AGAIN For Falsely Representing Bottled Tap Water As Naturally Spring-Sourced
Comment Now Follow Comments

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Chicago-based business has sued Nestlé over claims that the five gallon jugs of Ice Mountain Water it purchased for its office dispensers were falsely advertised as containing natural spring water when in reality they were simply filled with regular tap water.

It’s not that The Chicago Faucet Shoppe is unaware that many brands of bottled water on the market today tout the same stuff that flows into every kitchen sink. In fact, bottled water increasingly comes from the tap. A 2009 report found that nearly half of the bottled water in PET plastic bottles came from municipal sources.The company simply contends that Nestlé is misrepresenting its product by blatantly claiming that it’s something other than it is.

The Chicago Faucet Shoppe had been buying Ice Mountain Water since 2008 believing it to be true spring water containing naturally occurring minerals. It wasn’t until July 2012 that an executive at the company was tipped off to the water’s true origins by an employee.

Labels on bottles of Ice Mountain Water, print ads and advertising on the side of delivery trucks scream “100% Natural Spring Water” beneath picturesque images of ice-capped mountains. Marketing blurb on the Ice Mountain Water website asserts that the water has been filtered through mineral-rich aquifers and can be traced back thousands of years to the last ice age when melting glaciers fed rivers and springs. The website even boasts environmental stewardship and a commitment to preserve and protect Ice Mountain Water’s natural springs:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/nadiaaru...pring-sourced/
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:10 AM   #35
B-Large
Guest
 

Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fedaykin View Post
I'm surprised to see an organic food honk being squeamish about time honored, 100% all natural organic farming methods.

What do you think organic (and non organic) fertilizer is? Pixie dust?
Dehydrated poultry waste, that IS fertilizer... Unless you use alfalfa pellets...
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:17 AM   #36
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

The Dangers of Farmed Fish
by Dr. Josh Axe on March 3, 2010
You may have heard that eating fish is a healthy option. That’s a true statement, but in most cases today, it’s only a partially true statement. The reality of where our fish comes from is of paramount importance for our health! There is a vast different between wild caught fish and farmed fish.

Fish farms produce supermarket protein with high concentrations of antibiotics, pesticides and lower levels of healthy nutrients. Research has found that farmed fish has less usable omega-3 fatty acids than wild-caught fish and a 20% lower protein content. A USDA review confirmed the findings. Farmed fish are fattier and have a high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids. Imbalances in the levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids create inflammation in the body.

Farm-raised fish are given antibiotics to stave off disease that results from crowded conditions and are also treated with pesticides to combat sea lice. Sea lice from fish farms kill up to 95% of migrating juvenile wild salmon.

The pesticides used to treat sea lice in fish farms circulate throughout the ocean. Pesticides that have been banned for decades have concentrated in the fat of much marine life.

This fat is used in the feed that fish farms use, and studies by the Environmental Working Group, along with those done in Canada, Ireland and the UK, have found that cancer-causing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exist in farm-raised salmon at 16 times the rate of wild salmon.

Dibutyltin is a chemical used in PVC plastics. Dibutyltin can interfere with normal immune responses and inflammation control in both animals and humans. A 2008 study found that dibutyltin may be contributing to the rise of allergies, asthma, obesity and other metabolic and immune disorders in humans. Scientists have found that dibutyltin in farm-raised mussels is more than 6 times higher than that of wild mussels.

Researchers have also found levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), a chemical used as a flame retardant, in high levels in farm-raised fish. PBDEs are endocrine disruptors that are thought to contribute to cancer. Scientists believe that both fish feed and increasing concentrations in the open oceans are contributing to high PBDE levels in fish and humans.

Another study, conducted at the University of New York at Albany found that dioxin levels in farm-raised salmon are 11 times higher than those in wild salmon.



http://www.draxe.com/the-dangers-of-farmed-fish/
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:24 AM   #37
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Fish Farming's Growing Dangers

By Ken Stier Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2007

inShare
8 Send to Kindle

RON WURZER / GETTY
A man holds a farmed salmon.

Email Print Share Reprints
Follow @TIME
In her book Diet for a Small Planet, Frances Moore Lappe argued more than 35 years ago that grain-fed cattle were essentially "reverse protein factories" because they required many more pounds of plant protein to produce a pound of flesh. Now there's a similar dynamic in the global fish farming, or aquaculture, industry — especially as it strains to satisfy consumers' voracious appetite for top-of-the-food chain, carnivorous fish, such as salmon, tuna and shrimp.

Close to 40% of the seafood we eat nowadays comes from aquaculture; the $78 billion industry has grown 9% a year since 1975, making it the fastest-growing food group, and global demand has doubled since that time. Here's the catch: It takes a lot of input, in the form of other, lesser fish — also known as "reduction" or "trash" fish — to produce the kind of fish we prefer to eat directly. To create 1 kg (2.2 lbs.) of high-protein fishmeal, which is fed to farmed fish (along with fish oil, which also comes from other fish), it takes 4.5 kg (10 lbs.) of smaller pelagic, or open-ocean, fish. "Aquaculture's current heavy reliance on wild fish for feed carries substantial ecological risks," says Roz Naylor, a leading scholar on the subject at Stanford University's Center for Environmental Science and Policy. Unless the industry finds alternatives to using pelagic fish to sustain fish farms, says Naylor, the aquaculture industry could end up depleting an essential food source for many other species in the marine food chain.

Industry and publicly funded research have significantly mitigated this inefficiency and reduced the percentage of fish and oil content in aqua-feed, replacing it with vegetable proteins and oils. "I would say cost, the sustainability of resources — pelagic fisheries — and human health concerns have been driving researchers to find replacements for fishmeal and fish oil — and we are doing this to the greatest extent possible," says Dr. David Higgs, a fish nutritionist for the Canadian government who works closely with British Columbia's $450 million salmon industry. (Reducing the fish content in feed also reduces the accumulation of PCBs in farmed fish, though Higgs insists that PCB levels in fish from British Columbia are some 50 to 70 times below FDA standards.) But such improvements have been offset by the industry's explosive growth. In the salmon industry, the largest aquaculture sector, the amount of wild fish required to produce one unit of salmon was reduced 25% between 1997 and 2001, but total industry production grew by 60% during the same time.

There are other worrisome trends, such as the rapid expansion of other species now being farmed, which have much higher feed requirements. Ranched tuna, for instance, dine on live pelagic fish, such as anchovies, sardines and mackerel, but it takes about 20 kg (44 lbs.) of such feed to get 1 kg of tuna ready for a sushi bar near you. (Tuna are ranched — that is, corralled from the wild and then fed in anchored pens — because despite prodigious efforts, especially by the Japanese, no one has been able to raise tuna from eggs.)

"The problem is we've gone straight to the top. We are essentially, as some argue, farming tigers when we raise tuna or striped bass or cod," says Brian Halweil, a senior researcher with WorldWatch, a Washington-based environmental NGO. By contrast, the fish species at the core of the millennia-long tradition of fish-farming in Asia and parts of Africa — catfish, carp and milkfish — actually require less fish input than is ultimately harvested, because they are herbivorous or omnivorous. In Asia, the idea of feeding several times more fishmeal to get one pound back would seem sheer folly. "Ultimately that is really where the solution is — to cut back on these carnivorous species and turn our attention to these plant-eating ones," says U. Rashid Sumaila, a bioeconomist at the University of British Columbia (UBC). "Whether we are willing to do that is another thing, but that's the fundamental solution."

Environmentalists and industry dispute whether current wild-fish harvesting is done at sustainable levels, but there's no dispute that it's a finite resource — and demand keeps growing. A staggering 37% of all global seafood is now ground into feed, up from 7.7% in 1948, according to recent research from the UBC Fisheries Centre. One third of that feed goes to China, where 70% of the world's fish farming takes place; China now devotes nearly 1 million hectares (close to 4,000 sq. mi.) of land to shrimp farms. And about 45% of the global production of fishmeal and fish oil goes to the world's livestock industry, mostly pigs and poultry, up from 10% in 1988. If current trends continue, demand for fish oil will outstrip supply within a decade and the same could happen for fishmeal by 2050, says Stanford's Naylor. Already, the global supply of fishmeal has dropped from 7.7 million metric tons to 5.8 million metric tons between 1994 and 2005, according to the International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organization.




Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/arti...#ixzz2bgMyfTHb

Last edited by baja; 08-11-2013 at 11:59 AM..
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:42 AM   #38
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

FUQING, China — Here in southern China, beneath the looming mountains of Fujian Province, lie dozens of enormous ponds filled with murky brown water and teeming with eels, shrimp and tilapia, much of it destined for markets in Japan and the West.


Fuqing is No. 1 on a list for refused seafood shipments from China.
Fuqing is one of the centers of a booming industry that over two decades has transformed this country into the biggest producer and exporter of seafood in the world, and the fastest-growing supplier to the United States.

But that growth is threatened by the two most glaring environmental weaknesses in China: acute water shortages and water supplies contaminated by sewage, industrial waste and agricultural runoff that includes pesticides. The fish farms, in turn, are discharging wastewater that further pollutes the water supply.

“Our waters here are filthy,” said Ye Chao, an eel and shrimp farmer who has 20 giant ponds in western Fuqing. “There are simply too many aquaculture farms in this area. They’re all discharging water here, fouling up other farms.”

Farmers have coped with the toxic waters by mixing illegal veterinary drugs and pesticides into fish feed, which helps keep their stocks alive yet leaves poisonous and carcinogenic residues in seafood, posing health threats to consumers.

Environmental degradation, in other words, has become a food safety problem, and scientists say the long-term risks of consuming contaminated seafood could lead to higher rates of cancer and liver disease and other afflictions.

No one is more vulnerable to these health risks than the Chinese, because most of the seafood in China stays at home. But foreign importers are also worried. In recent years, the European Union and Japan have imposed temporary bans on Chinese seafood because of illegal drug residues. The United States blocked imports of several types of fish this year after inspectors detected traces of illegal drugs linked to cancer.



http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/15/wo...anted=all&_r=0
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:47 AM   #39
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

So Fedaykin - eat up it's just fertilizer





Chinese Fish Farms Full of Toxic Chemicals
Wednesday, July 09, 2008 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
Tags: farmed fish, health news, Natural News


(NaturalNews) Contamination of water supplies and illegal use of veterinary drugs has led to the severe contamination of Chinese fish farms, with potentially serious health consequences for those who eat the fish.

China produces 70 percent of the world's farmed fish, and since the 1980s has become the biggest seafood exporter in the world. Yet this growth has only exacerbated the pollution problems already facing China's water sources. The high density of fish farms in regions like the Fuqing Province in the south has led to the discharge of huge quantities of wastewater into already compromised rivers.

"Our waters here are filthy," said Ye Chao, an eel and shrimp farmer from Fuqing. "There are simply too many aquaculture farms in this area. They're all discharging water here, fouling up other farms."

The Chinese government has declared more than half of the rivers in the country too polluted to drink from. Many sections of Fuqing's major waterway, the Long River, have been declared too toxic for any use.

Pollution of river and coastal waters comes from rapidly growing industries that are discharging pesticides, oil, mercury, lead, copper and agricultural runoff. This pollution has caused massive die-offs at fish farms, leading farmers to illegally mix veterinary drugs into their ponds to try and keep their fish alive. According to farmers who eventually abandoned such practices, not using drugs led to an immediate 30 percent increase in fish mortality.

Beyond the health risks to the fish themselves, pollution causes the accumulation of toxic substances in the bodies of the fish, which poses a health risk to people who eat them.

"There are heavy metals, mercury and flame retardants in fish samples we've tested," said Ming Hung Wong, a biology at Hong Kong Baptist University.

Wang Wu, a professor from the Shanghai Fisheries University, attributes the problem to unbridled growth. "For 50 years, we've blindly emphasized economic growth," he said. "The only pursuit has been GDP, and now we can see that the water turns dirty and the seafood gets dangerous."


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/023593_fi...#ixzz2bgRZArze

But it looks all pretty and such in them there nice plastic wrapped packages in Wall Mart and the price, well oh my it's cheap.

Last edited by baja; 08-11-2013 at 12:00 PM..
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 11:51 AM   #40
Rohirrim
Partisan
 
Rohirrim's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Twixt Hell & Highwater
Posts: 55,935

Adopt-a-Bronco:
Malik Jackson
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meck77 View Post
Nestle's CEO pissing and moaning about organic food. He even goes on to say that access to water should not be a public right. Keep in mind Nestle is one of the biggest if not the biggest bottled water companies in the world.

http://www.realfarmacy.com/nestle-ceo-water-right/

So next time you are cruising the isles at the store thinking about stuffing your child with a Nestle's product think of this ahole.
Reminds me of the cold logic of the Nazis.
Rohirrim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 12:08 PM   #41
Meck77
.
 

Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 16,833
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rohirrim View Post
Reminds me of the cold logic of the Nazis.
It's unbelievable how candid he was. I did cross check to make sure that the man speaking was the CEO of Nestle and it was. A quick google imagine search verified. You see I believe it's important to at least try and verify the information we post in this forum and not use "Don't shoot the messenger" as a excuse for just posting random garbage not based on any fact at all.

If we demand responsibility from farmers to grow healthy food as members of this community I feel we are responsible to try and post FACTUAL information the best we can to help one another.

Last edited by Meck77; 08-11-2013 at 12:47 PM..
Meck77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2013, 12:32 PM   #42
baja
Headmaster
 
baja's Avatar
 
The Fixer

Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: in the present moment
Posts: 61,391

Adopt-a-Bronco:
C J Anderson
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meck77 View Post
It's unbelievable how candid he was. I did cross check to make sure that the man speaking was the CEO of Nestle and it was. A quick google imagine search verified. You see I believe it's important to at least try and verify the information we post in this forum and not use "Don't shoot the messenger" as a excuse for just posting random garbage not based on any fact at all.

If we demand responsibility from farmers to grow healthy food as members of this community I feel we are responsible to try and post FACTUAL information the best we can to help one another.

Plenty of material floats through here with no research at all by the poster and sadly admittedly.

Translation; The stuff I don't believe
baja is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:31 AM.


Denver Broncos