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Old 06-26-2013, 03:41 PM   #51
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1. Exercise a ****load (cardio) as it helps with brain functioning
2. Get sun
3. Confide in others
4. Understand where your brain stops and you start. Think outside your own emotions.
5. Take fish oils
6. Take a job with the US Postal Service
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Old 06-26-2013, 04:33 PM   #52
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It's ok to take medicine. I've been taking anti depressants since 1992. It works and if I don't take them I get very very depressed. My grandma took Xanax and other stuff for many years and lived to be 90.
I think in some cases it could be the last resort for some and that's all well and fine. I think most of us that are against the drugs say so with the emphasis being that try something natural at first and give it some time. There are indeed probably a ton of cases in which the drugs help people but I'll also tell you that there are probably millions who probably could be doing just as well without them if they tried some other things. I'll bet you there are hundreds of thousands upon thousands of people who felt this way and went to the doctor and got put on a drug, without even trying to fix other things in their life first. They just do what doc says. Doc wants to get paid. Here you go sir, good day to you, best of luck.


I don't understand how some people make that decision to go on SSRI. They have to know the sexual side affects. Many of these were used to treat pre-mature ejaculation and I've read forums all over the web where people say they just can't reach a climax (both men and women) while on these. The weight gain is another. Even read where some people who took them for a short period of time (6 months) then got off them and a year later they still have these sex side affects. Can anybody comment on those (please keep it clean). I got prescribed citalopram a few years ago and I took 1 pill and I'll tell you I had sex that night with GF and it was almost 2 hours before I could pop. Never took one again.

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Old 06-26-2013, 04:37 PM   #53
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Anyone else on here have anxiety issues?

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Old 06-26-2013, 04:38 PM   #54
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Have you heard of drinking?
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:24 PM   #55
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Have you heard of drinking?
I have copped for years using Alcohol. But I am going to turn into a Full Blown drunk at the rate I am heading so I have stopped completely.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:28 PM   #56
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Severe anxiety and depression in my early twenties. I did two things: started exercising, hard. Many have already mentioned this, but I don't think it can be overstated. Work out. Or run. Or walk. Whatever works for you, but BE ACTIVE.

I also began studying Buddhism, and began meditating. There's something profoundly defusing about inquiry, in the moment. What is the sensation of anxiety, right now, in your body? What is the sensation of anxious thinking? It's all just sensation. Observe it, moment to moment.

Your mileage may vary, but it's worked for me. Good luck, dude.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:36 PM   #57
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Severe anxiety and depression in my early twenties. I did two things: started exercising, hard. Many have already mentioned this, but I don't think it can be overstated. Work out. Or run. Or walk. Whatever works for you, but BE ACTIVE.

I also began studying Buddhism, and began meditating. There's something profoundly defusing about inquiry, in the moment. What is the sensation of anxiety, right now, in your body? What is the sensation of anxious thinking? It's all just sensation. Observe it, moment to moment.

Your mileage may vary, but it's worked for me. Good luck, dude.
Hmmm, interesting. I've heard the stuff about "being in the moment" and the meditating but never thought anything about studying Buddhism. Can you give some additional insight into that and why it's going to help some body be more "in the moment"?
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:20 PM   #58
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There's Buddhist theory, and there's Buddhist meditation. Like any religion, there are countless interpretations of Buddhism, but most put the practice of meditation before theory. (Buddhism is sort of like an anti-religion that way. Instead of faith, Buddhism at its core is based on the experiential.) Really, most of the theory is a way of talking about what you come to understand if you meditate a lot, so it's pointless really to talk about it without meditating. To answer your question, being in the moment takes practice, and that practice is meditation. Through a friend, I was lucky to find Vipassana meditation. Vipassana focuses very specifically on body sensation, and the meditation begins with paying attention to the breath. As you do it, you begin to experience your own thoughts (for example) as just another sensation. Thoughts happen. We usually identify ourselves with our thoughts, but they happen with or without us. They have a sensation you can observe. They are part of the moment, but not its totality. Same with anxiety, since we're on the topic. Anxiety is just a word. What's the sensation? My chest feels hot, my lungs feel tight, my heart is racing...it's just part of the moment. So, rather than BEING anxious, it's more like, 'Anxiety is happening. Observe the sensation.'

Long post, sorry. That answer your question?
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:48 PM   #59
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There's Buddhist theory, and there's Buddhist meditation. Like any religion, there are countless interpretations of Buddhism, but most put the practice of meditation before theory. (Buddhism is sort of like an anti-religion that way. Instead of faith, Buddhism at its core is based on the experiential.) Really, most of the theory is a way of talking about what you come to understand if you meditate a lot, so it's pointless really to talk about it without meditating. To answer your question, being in the moment takes practice, and that practice is meditation. Through a friend, I was lucky to find Vipassana meditation. Vipassana focuses very specifically on body sensation, and the meditation begins with paying attention to the breath. As you do it, you begin to experience your own thoughts (for example) as just another sensation. Thoughts happen. We usually identify ourselves with our thoughts, but they happen with or without us. They have a sensation you can observe. They are part of the moment, but not its totality. Same with anxiety, since we're on the topic. Anxiety is just a word. What's the sensation? My chest feels hot, my lungs feel tight, my heart is racing...it's just part of the moment. So, rather than BEING anxious, it's more like, 'Anxiety is happening. Observe the sensation.'

Long post, sorry. That answer your question?
No that wasn't long. No problem. When I was really digging in and trying to learn as much about "anxiety" as I could, of course I came across all different methods of dealing with it. Some of them share many principals but some have some different aspects altogether. For example, the Lindon Method is all about understanding ALL of the different ways anxiety manifests itself and so you learn to identity all the various ways. But he also is heavy on diversion. He explains all the sensations but then when you feel them, he's heavy on diverting attention to something else. Where I've seen others say embrace that feeling and listen to it and, as best you can, accept it and try to feel what's going on. That's a far stretch from just trying to divert your attention. It seems there are really 2 basic forms of dealing with it. One is the diversion where you don't want to acknowledge it and just try to move on while the other is to dig deeper trying to get a better understanding as to why it's happening.

But I really dig that part where you mention that thoughts themselves can be a sensation. Do you recommend any material on this Vipassana meditation?
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:38 PM   #60
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No that wasn't long. No problem. When I was really digging in and trying to learn as much about "anxiety" as I could, of course I came across all different methods of dealing with it. Some of them share many principals but some have some different aspects altogether. For example, the Lindon Method is all about understanding ALL of the different ways anxiety manifests itself and so you learn to identity all the various ways. But he also is heavy on diversion. He explains all the sensations but then when you feel them, he's heavy on diverting attention to something else. Where I've seen others say embrace that feeling and listen to it and, as best you can, accept it and try to feel what's going on. That's a far stretch from just trying to divert your attention. It seems there are really 2 basic forms of dealing with it. One is the diversion where you don't want to acknowledge it and just try to move on while the other is to dig deeper trying to get a better understanding as to why it's happening.

But I really dig that part where you mention that thoughts themselves can be a sensation. Do you recommend any material on this Vipassana meditation?
I'm thinking the Buddhist approach would align with embracing, but without necessarily digging in. It's more passive, acknowledging that what is, is. The why isn't necessarily important, unless it presents itself. Which, if you hang out long enough, it does. What did you find worked best for you? Never heard of the Lindon Method, but I like the idea of diversion: Runaway!

Here is a good point of departure for researching Vipassana: http://www.dhamma.org/

Research and practice are two different things. Really, the only way to understand it is to do it. I'd suggest doing one of the retreats (you can find a list of them at the site). The ten day retreats are intense, at least for the first few days, but you come out CLEAR. There are some shorter ones, too.
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:49 PM   #61
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No that wasn't long. No problem. When I was really digging in and trying to learn as much about "anxiety" as I could, of course I came across all different methods of dealing with it. Some of them share many principals but some have some different aspects altogether. For example, the Lindon Method is all about understanding ALL of the different ways anxiety manifests itself and so you learn to identity all the various ways. But he also is heavy on diversion. He explains all the sensations but then when you feel them, he's heavy on diverting attention to something else. Where I've seen others say embrace that feeling and listen to it and, as best you can, accept it and try to feel what's going on. That's a far stretch from just trying to divert your attention. It seems there are really 2 basic forms of dealing with it. One is the diversion where you don't want to acknowledge it and just try to move on while the other is to dig deeper trying to get a better understanding as to why it's happening.

But I really dig that part where you mention that thoughts themselves can be a sensation. Do you recommend any material on this Vipassana meditation?

It's actually very simple... diversion is effective, once you've learned to accept.
When your level of acceptance is such that you can sit with the symptoms and not add additional mental commentary (my head is killing me, when will this end, etc.)... that's when diversion is a great tactic.

The problem with diversion without acceptance is that you're going to end up fighting. When your symptoms come on, you'll start hustling to divert attention... scrambling to do something else... and distract yourself. This in itself can create more stress, tension and worry. It's the old concept of trying not to think of something.... good luck.

So, practice total acceptance first, then use distraction once you are at ease with the symptoms.

Claire Weekes (google her) was the pioneer of almost all modern anxiety/stress disorder recovery methods. She was curing people without meds long before we understood what stress disorders even were. Check her out.
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Old 06-27-2013, 01:03 AM   #62
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It's actually very simple... diversion is effective, once you've learned to accept.
When your level of acceptance is such that you can sit with the symptoms and not add additional mental commentary (my head is killing me, when will this end, etc.)... that's when diversion is a great tactic.

The problem with diversion without acceptance is that you're going to end up fighting. When your symptoms come on, you'll start hustling to divert attention... scrambling to do something else... and distract yourself. This in itself can create more stress, tension and worry. It's the old concept of trying not to think of something.... good luck.

So, practice total acceptance first, then use distraction once you are at ease with the symptoms.

Claire Weekes (google her) was the pioneer of almost all modern anxiety/stress disorder recovery methods. She was curing people without meds long before we understood what stress disorders even were. Check her out.

I've heard great things about her. I've had some people tell me that her book "Hope-Help-Your-Nerves" was awesome. I'll probably order it and see just what it is that makes her so good.
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Old 06-27-2013, 01:17 AM   #63
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I'm thinking the Buddhist approach would align with embracing, but without necessarily digging in. It's more passive, acknowledging that what is, is. The why isn't necessarily important, unless it presents itself. Which, if you hang out long enough, it does. What did you find worked best for you? Never heard of the Lindon Method, but I like the idea of diversion: Runaway!

Here is a good point of departure for researching Vipassana: http://www.dhamma.org/

Research and practice are two different things. Really, the only way to understand it is to do it. I'd suggest doing one of the retreats (you can find a list of them at the site). The ten day retreats are intense, at least for the first few days, but you come out CLEAR. There are some shorter ones, too.
Well it's hard to say what helped me really. I still have my moments. I don't ever get the extreme symptoms I used to. No panic attacks, no tingling fingers or hot skin. Very very rarely do I even get minor palpitations anymore either. For me, it's getting much better. I still get some minor lightheadedness here and there and I know I still have obsessive thoughts and dwell on minor things too much so still working away.

I did get out of very stressful job several years ago and now I am self employed and financially I'm doing better then ever. So that I'm sure has helped. I have been working out often this past year and getting in the sun much more often and for longer periods. So those are life changes I made. As for what am I doing mentally, well I did do all that research and realized nothing was going to kill me, lol. I just got so tired of wondering what was happening that I just F it, if I die I die, I don't give a **** anymore. I'm not going to keep feeding this thing more negative energy. And I am sleeping much better now days. Normally 5 or 6 hours. Before it was dreadful. Trying to get off that Ambien and Lunesta a year ago was a b****. But I did it and I'm glad I did. I just adopted the same thought. I said if I don't sleep, who cares, so the next day I'm a zombie, so be it. It took a month or so to start getting to the point where I could sleep 3 or 4 hours. Then another month before I started getting 5 and 6.

But I don't want to rest on what I've done. I want to go even further and do things like increase positive mood and energy. So I'm always open to discussing this type of stuff with people and if I can help somebody along the way that's cool too.
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Old 06-27-2013, 01:42 AM   #64
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Alot of good advice. I really struggle with anxiety, especially in crowded or tight spaces. Just thinking about it induces panic.

Alot of this goes back a few years with the army. I worked in Casualty operations at the height of the Iraq war. We were shorthanded, I worked nights, 24 hrs straight by myself, then mornings, my sleep was always off, my diet suffered and I stopped working out. This lasted for three years. I have actually never been the same person. Wound up with a host of medical problems and developed an inner ear problem. As a result, I have had a slew of medications thrown at me at one time or another.

A few casued sexual problems. Immediately stopped taking. A few led to suicidal ideations. I was actually going through the steps to plan how I would do it so my family wouldnt find me, and doing everything step 1, 2, 3 etc. Only the realization that I had NO EMOTION while planning this caused me to evaluate what was wrong with my thought process.

Now I dont take anything. Never had great results with them anyway. I have had embarrasing full blown attacks, but have found that exercise helps.

One other thing that I havent found mentioned. Take up a hobby. I find it diverting. I like collecting and resumed a childhood collection. Now when I start getting into areas that normally my brain would start moving into panic mode, I have something else to think about. Has actually helped me alot.
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