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Old 05-28-2013, 01:06 PM   #1
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I was surprised at this kids story, what he endured and still ended up being drafted high.


Most disconcerting, Allen acknowledged we "can't rule that out" if there is a correlation between the abdominal injury and last year's heart surgery to repair a torn inferior vena cava. At this point, the Raiders "don't anticipate it being an issue."

Allen's concession about the possibility of post-surgery issues comes as a surprise after Hayden reportedly checked out medically in most NFL draft rooms. "Most of the teams have come to the conclusion that it was a once-in-a-gazillion situation," NFL Network draft analyst Mayock noted last month. "That has no more chance of happening than it did in the first place."

Hayden's history demands extra precaution for internal injuries. The hope is that the injury is not serious and the Raiders are simply preparing for all possibilities.
More here:
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap100...l-raiders-camp
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Old 05-28-2013, 02:20 PM   #2
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I knew it!
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Old 05-28-2013, 02:22 PM   #3
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You knew what


"The procedure was more precautionary, and the Raiders do not believe this will be a big concern going forward, according to NFL.com's Ian Rapoport.

Preach on chicken little.
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Old 05-28-2013, 02:59 PM   #4
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sounds like a minor issue.
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Old 05-28-2013, 03:35 PM   #5
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I knew it!
As knowledgeable as you are MUG, I should have just taken him!
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Old 05-28-2013, 06:30 PM   #6
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Best wishes for DJ, seems like a solid young man and a hell of a corner prospect. Alas, even for the Fade. But really would be a nice story if he can make a full rebound and realize his full potential as a player.

Afterall even though he's sliver and black (for now), they will need far more help then just he to turn it around .. if he helps them be a little more competitive fair enough. Will just make our victories over them that much sweeter.
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:08 PM   #7
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FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:39 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Dr. Broncenstein View Post
FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
I think you made all that up, it certainly sounds like uneducated drivel to me.
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:47 PM   #9
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FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.

The important question is, would you have drafted him?
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:52 PM   #10
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The important question is, would you have drafted him?
Don't know. Would have to have access to a physical exam and medical imaging.
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Old 05-29-2013, 02:10 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dr. Broncenstein View Post
FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
****ing show off
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Old 05-29-2013, 02:50 PM   #12
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Hello Doctor

Doctor

Doctor

Doctor, Docter

Yes Doctor, shall we begin?
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:52 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Dr. Broncenstein View Post
FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
So basically its really bad!
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Old 05-29-2013, 04:02 PM   #14
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FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
This post, in combination with the wiki pages on exsanguination and vena cava, made me a touch nauseous.
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Old 05-29-2013, 04:09 PM   #15
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So basically its really bad!
Not necessarily. If he required surgery for a bowel obstruction (which is what has been suggested) it is not a minor issue. Surgery is typically the cause for adhesions that cause bowel obstructions, so surgery tends to be the least desirable intervention and is reseved for patients with no other options. Sometimes a single adheshion can be taken down laparoscopically.. but sometimes it requires a bowel resection and possibly a large open incision.. or it can get much worse. This is what I do, and again its a spectrum from "no joke but uncomplicated" to "hostile abdomen and constant threat to life."
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Old 05-30-2013, 06:01 AM   #16
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So what Doc is saying is that the Raiders **** the bed with this pick. Kinda like with Ronaldo McClain.
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Old 05-30-2013, 12:11 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Broncenstein View Post
FWIW: If you are hospitalized for "scar tissue in the abdomen" related to a previous surgery, you have at the very least some type of bowel obstruction which is not an insignifficant problem.. and could lead to something much worse like a bowel perforation or infarction. This can be from adhesions, incisional hernias, internal hernias, or a combination thereof. Most commonly it affects the small bowel. Surgery for adhesions leads to more adhesions, especially if it requires an open approach. Most small bowel obstructions related to adhesions will resolve on their own with bowel decompression (nasogastric tube), IV fluids, and time. Surgical intervention is reserved for complete obstructions that will not resolve with conservative management, hernias, closed loop obstructions, perforation, or suspected bowel infarction.

From what I've read, Hayden required a combined laparotomy and sternotomy (completely open from top of the sternum to below his umbilicus) to repair a freak injury to his vena cava. It is truly amazing that he actually survived long enough to reach the hospital, let alone a surgical repair. That is possibly the worst vessel to injure. It carries the same amount of blood as the aorta, but handles like wet paper when trying to control it. A vena cava laceration typically exanguinates in a few minutes.
I used to be able to name the flight crews of all Apollo and Mercury flights as well as the name of the space crafts and some of the Gemini crews.

I have also forgotten the Opus numbers and some of the keys for all of Beethoven's symphonies.

Sadly I think I have forgotten more than Dr Bronc knows, not in a good way for me...

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Old 05-31-2013, 06:09 AM   #18
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Great ESPN video on Hayden's injury and getting back to football. Being drafted by the Raiders doesn't help, but it's hard not to root for the kid.

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn%3A9223992
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