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Old 05-20-2012, 08:25 AM   #26
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Ryan Clady, blew his knee out...rehabbed...came back...and still has not missed 1 NFL Game. The guy is a warrior. He said that he was playing on 1-leg in 2010 and still played every game. Last year, he improved his run blocking...which is a very good thing for this team. Tebow is going to be the QB who is sacked the most, until he learns just to wait until the next play. Clady will be top-5 LT again this year...with Manning.

Get him locked up long-term!
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:26 AM   #27
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Yep I've never been a huge fan of his..

came out of college that played ZBS and although he had great feet, he also had a very mobile QB to help him out..

Then he was injured and frankly I think those great feet are not so great anymore..

I also think that DE's and DC have a book on him and might not be as good as some think..

They have had a TE next to him since year one helping out.. IMO it is time to draft his replacement..

If they do sign him I hope they place some major incentives in it and have an escape clause.

I'm not convinced he will ever be the OLT that he was in his rookie year..
Wow, one of the most ignorant posts I've read in a long time.
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:28 AM   #28
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Big co-sign on this. Clady hasn't been an "elite" left tackle since the injury. Part of it isn't his fault, in that he was blocking for fetal position Kyle and a very raw Tim Tebow who at times held the ball way too long.

He's very good, but I'd wait to see what happens this year before you give him elite top 3 paid at his position type coin, which I'm assuming he'll want.
Clady is going to dominate this year...with Manning. The Broncos know it. That's why it's the smart thing to do...sign him up now and a bargain price...before you are forced to pay him top-3 money!!!
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:30 AM   #29
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It's like the "lets draft a QB in round 4" because we need to find PFM replacement. Let's move on from Clady and draft his replacement

We need to upgrade Beadles so let's draft a Oline in round 2 because he will be better when Beadles was drafted in round two. Odd thinking if you ask me.

When you want to build a team all things equal you get the QB then LT.
LTs don't grow on trees. I'm sure they will come to an agreement that both sides can find beneficial


You have to be careful judging Clady on '11 when they were ask to switch up mid stream and none of the Olinemen knew where Tebow was and he held onto the ball way too long.

A 3 step drop has to be a 3 step drop in the NFL and then the QB needs to get the ball out to the right WR.

Ask Kupes dad if Olinemen are asked to block all day on any play. No they are asked to do their job and the QB is asked to do his.
Agreed. I think the standard rule is the line needs to give the QB about 4 seconds to get rid of the ball. And with guys like Orton and Tim taking all day to get rid of the ball tonly makes the line look bad. With Peyton getting rid of the ball on average in about 3 or 4 seconds it will greatly help the line. Plus knowing wherr your QB is and.what he is doing will decrease the number of holding penalties
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:35 AM   #30
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Clady will be the best LT that Peyton has ever had!
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:26 AM   #31
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Agreed. I think the standard rule is the line needs to give the QB about 4 seconds to get rid of the ball. And with guys like Orton and Tim taking all day to get rid of the ball tonly makes the line look bad. With Peyton getting rid of the ball on average in about 3 or 4 seconds it will greatly help the line. Plus knowing wherr your QB is and.what he is doing will decrease the number of holding penalties
that's about right. you give the QB enough time for a 3 step drop, go through his progressions and then deliver. obviously some drops require 5 or 7 steps but for the most part if you give the QB 4 secs and he can't get rid of the ball then something is wrong.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:31 AM   #32
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That's my entire point. Extend him now if the contract terms are reasonable. However, if he's demanding top 5 LT in the league type money as part of his extension, he hasn't proven he's worthy of that type of coin. If this year under Manning he has a similar season to his rookie year, than you break the bank.
I guess you missed post 11.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:37 AM   #33
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I wouldn't be opposed to Clady making top-five money with incentives, but he'd have to play a season and show he's completely over his injury and back to form in order to receive that straight up.

Really though, his floor is probably above average. The more I think about it, the less I'd care if they paid him more than he's worth right now. The way contracts are constantly growing each season almost forces teams to estimate market value down the road when paying players now, and if they overpay him now on a six or seven-year deal it will probably end up being a fair price in two or three years.

This is all assuming he stays healthy and doesn't forget how to play the position.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:50 AM   #34
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Clady will be the best LT that Peyton has ever had!
That's not saying to much because Manning always had a crappy line. He just gets the ball out so fast that defenses can't really get to him.
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:15 AM   #35
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That's not saying to much because Manning always had a crappy line. He just gets the ball out so fast that defenses can't really get to him.
yeah but Tarrik Glenn wasn't a scrub at LT though. and Clady is better than him. so that says a lot. LT with Glenn and C with Saturday were pretty good players on the OL for the Colts. their overall line has never been great but those two were standout players.

heck you could argue that if Blake pans out and ends up replacing either Walton or Beadles that this will be the best OL Manning has ever played behind.
that's a very good thing considering the things he was able to do behind a crappy OL.
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Old 05-20-2012, 12:57 PM   #36
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He had Meadows & Glenn two nice bookends at the beginning of his career.
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Old 05-20-2012, 01:22 PM   #37
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either pay him big now,or somebodyelse will be next yr. Clady isn't going to sign a low-ball contract,and if he plays great this coming season he'll get paid even more.
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Old 05-20-2012, 01:48 PM   #38
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why is everyone hating on clady... the guys a 91 over all in madden we need to lock him up long term
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Old 05-20-2012, 02:19 PM   #39
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why is everyone hating on clady... the guys a 91 over all in madden we need to lock him up long term
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Old 05-20-2012, 03:02 PM   #40
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http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/rapid-r.../post/19096277
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Old 05-20-2012, 03:09 PM   #41
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He's also deadly on the tackle bubble screen.
He took a shot to the knee also on that ridiculous play. Maybe the alltime dumbest play in Bronco history.
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Old 05-21-2012, 09:00 AM   #42
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Last year was probably pretty hard on him, cause the QB would get happy feet before the play developed. He has been a solid LT for us and I bet he will get even better. Don't think he wants Manning chewing his ass out.
I agree.. I think alot of the negative numbers Clady received last year were because of TT. Yes, TT was trying to make things happen.. but that style of play tends to hurt the offense as a whole.. sandlot football is what I call it. Can't expect your linemen to stay on their blocks for more than 5 or 6 Mississippi (seconds).
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Old 05-22-2012, 06:46 AM   #43
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Statistics Don’t Tell Story for Ryan Clady



By ANDY BENOIT May 22, 2012, 6:00 am



Reports about a possible contract extension for Broncos left tackle Ryan Clady recently led to a wave of arguments that his performance had been declining. Those arguments aren’t flawed, but their main points of evidence are.

In truth, Clady’s performance has declined. As a first-round rookie in 2008, he instantly proved to be football’s most athletic left tackle, if not football’s best left tackle. His 2009 season was equally impressive. In the spring of 2010, however, Clady tore his patellar tendon in a pickup basketball game. He didn’t miss any regular-season action, but he clearly didn’t have the same explosiveness. Last season, he regained much of his original form, but he was also mistake-prone.

This is where the flawed evidence comes in. ESPN.com recently got statistical to highlight Clady’s 2011 woes. In 16 starts, according to Stats L.L.C., Clady allowed a career-high nine sacks and was penalized 12 times. Since allowing just a half-sack as a rookie, Clady has given up 24.5 sacks over the past three years.

Here’s the problem: “sacks allowed” is a respectable statistic, but only if taken with a grain of salt. The people at Stats who track and grade game action are required to record the result of a play, not what actually happened on a play. In Clady’s case, many of his allowed sacks were a consequence of Tim Tebow’s running around to buy time. Sure, the man Clady blocked may have gotten the sack, but Clady successfully blocked for an entire seven-step drop; Tebow just turned it into a 13-step drop.

Another caveat: a “sacks allowed” stat can show that a talented left tackle was beaten by a talented edge rusher one or two times, but it can’t show that that talented left tackle singlehandedly kept the talented edge rusher at bay on the other 30-something dropbacks. Sometimes what’s more important than what a player did on a play was what a player was asked to do. Last seaon, the Broncos were often able to ask their left tackle to face the opposing team’s top pass rusher with no tight end help or even a chip block.

This is not meant to be a defense of Ryan Clady. Although Clady did improve as a run blocker in 2011, his overall play has indeed dipped a bit from his first two years. Twelve penalties are far too many, and so are nine sacks when considering that Denver ranked 32nd in pass attempts. But there needs to be more emphasis on the grain of salt. Watch the film and you’ll see, quite clearly, that Clady is a good football player. He just is. The numbers suggest he’s a bottom-feeder; the film shows he’s a top-feeder.

To judge Clady, or any offensive lineman, solely on his “sacks allowed” is akin to judging quarterbacks on interceptions. Fewer negative plays does not equal better performance. Alex Smith threw five interceptions last season; Tom Brady threw 12. But because quarterbacks can be portrayed through multiple statistical categories, no one in their right mind would argue that Smith was a better quarterback than Brady. Smith threw for 3,144 yards; Brady threw for 5,235. Smith had 17 touchdowns; Brady had 39.

Unfortunately, offensive linemen have no other statistics. Sure, there are the little-known rushing stats by field lane (the Broncos when running left last season had 67 power runs, 22 runs of 10-plus yards and 19 negative plays, which are solid all-around numbers), but those are vague and often misleading. For example, a lot of runs to the left are set up by a right guard’s pull block. How is that depicted in the stats?

Many football statistics are circumstantial and/or influenced by a multitude of factors. What’s important is to trust how a player – especially an offensive lineman – looks on film and make that the backbone of evaluation. Because this is what quality front offices do, don’t be surprised if Denver’s “mistake-prone” left tackle soon becomes one of the highest-paid players at his position



http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2...or-ryan-clady/
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:11 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Bronco Rob View Post
Statistics Don’t Tell Story for Ryan Clady



By ANDY BENOIT May 22, 2012, 6:00 am



Reports about a possible contract extension for Broncos left tackle Ryan Clady recently led to a wave of arguments that his performance had been declining. Those arguments aren’t flawed, but their main points of evidence are.

In truth, Clady’s performance has declined. As a first-round rookie in 2008, he instantly proved to be football’s most athletic left tackle, if not football’s best left tackle. His 2009 season was equally impressive. In the spring of 2010, however, Clady tore his patellar tendon in a pickup basketball game. He didn’t miss any regular-season action, but he clearly didn’t have the same explosiveness. Last season, he regained much of his original form, but he was also mistake-prone.

This is where the flawed evidence comes in. ESPN.com recently got statistical to highlight Clady’s 2011 woes. In 16 starts, according to Stats L.L.C., Clady allowed a career-high nine sacks and was penalized 12 times. Since allowing just a half-sack as a rookie, Clady has given up 24.5 sacks over the past three years.

Here’s the problem: “sacks allowed” is a respectable statistic, but only if taken with a grain of salt. The people at Stats who track and grade game action are required to record the result of a play, not what actually happened on a play. In Clady’s case, many of his allowed sacks were a consequence of Tim Tebow’s running around to buy time. Sure, the man Clady blocked may have gotten the sack, but Clady successfully blocked for an entire seven-step drop; Tebow just turned it into a 13-step drop.

Another caveat: a “sacks allowed” stat can show that a talented left tackle was beaten by a talented edge rusher one or two times, but it can’t show that that talented left tackle singlehandedly kept the talented edge rusher at bay on the other 30-something dropbacks. Sometimes what’s more important than what a player did on a play was what a player was asked to do. Last seaon, the Broncos were often able to ask their left tackle to face the opposing team’s top pass rusher with no tight end help or even a chip block.

This is not meant to be a defense of Ryan Clady. Although Clady did improve as a run blocker in 2011, his overall play has indeed dipped a bit from his first two years. Twelve penalties are far too many, and so are nine sacks when considering that Denver ranked 32nd in pass attempts. But there needs to be more emphasis on the grain of salt. Watch the film and you’ll see, quite clearly, that Clady is a good football player. He just is. The numbers suggest he’s a bottom-feeder; the film shows he’s a top-feeder.

To judge Clady, or any offensive lineman, solely on his “sacks allowed” is akin to judging quarterbacks on interceptions. Fewer negative plays does not equal better performance. Alex Smith threw five interceptions last season; Tom Brady threw 12. But because quarterbacks can be portrayed through multiple statistical categories, no one in their right mind would argue that Smith was a better quarterback than Brady. Smith threw for 3,144 yards; Brady threw for 5,235. Smith had 17 touchdowns; Brady had 39.

Unfortunately, offensive linemen have no other statistics. Sure, there are the little-known rushing stats by field lane (the Broncos when running left last season had 67 power runs, 22 runs of 10-plus yards and 19 negative plays, which are solid all-around numbers), but those are vague and often misleading. For example, a lot of runs to the left are set up by a right guard’s pull block. How is that depicted in the stats?

Many football statistics are circumstantial and/or influenced by a multitude of factors. What’s important is to trust how a player – especially an offensive lineman – looks on film and make that the backbone of evaluation. Because this is what quality front offices do, don’t be surprised if Denver’s “mistake-prone” left tackle soon becomes one of the highest-paid players at his position



http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2...or-ryan-clady/
Good piece.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:27 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by Bronco Rob View Post
Statistics Don’t Tell Story for Ryan Clady



By ANDY BENOIT May 22, 2012, 6:00 am



Reports about a possible contract extension for Broncos left tackle Ryan Clady recently led to a wave of arguments that his performance had been declining. Those arguments aren’t flawed, but their main points of evidence are.

In truth, Clady’s performance has declined. As a first-round rookie in 2008, he instantly proved to be football’s most athletic left tackle, if not football’s best left tackle. His 2009 season was equally impressive. In the spring of 2010, however, Clady tore his patellar tendon in a pickup basketball game. He didn’t miss any regular-season action, but he clearly didn’t have the same explosiveness. Last season, he regained much of his original form, but he was also mistake-prone.

This is where the flawed evidence comes in. ESPN.com recently got statistical to highlight Clady’s 2011 woes. In 16 starts, according to Stats L.L.C., Clady allowed a career-high nine sacks and was penalized 12 times. Since allowing just a half-sack as a rookie, Clady has given up 24.5 sacks over the past three years.

Here’s the problem: “sacks allowed” is a respectable statistic, but only if taken with a grain of salt. The people at Stats who track and grade game action are required to record the result of a play, not what actually happened on a play. In Clady’s case, many of his allowed sacks were a consequence of Tim Tebow’s running around to buy time. Sure, the man Clady blocked may have gotten the sack, but Clady successfully blocked for an entire seven-step drop; Tebow just turned it into a 13-step drop.

Another caveat: a “sacks allowed” stat can show that a talented left tackle was beaten by a talented edge rusher one or two times, but it can’t show that that talented left tackle singlehandedly kept the talented edge rusher at bay on the other 30-something dropbacks. Sometimes what’s more important than what a player did on a play was what a player was asked to do. Last seaon, the Broncos were often able to ask their left tackle to face the opposing team’s top pass rusher with no tight end help or even a chip block.

This is not meant to be a defense of Ryan Clady. Although Clady did improve as a run blocker in 2011, his overall play has indeed dipped a bit from his first two years. Twelve penalties are far too many, and so are nine sacks when considering that Denver ranked 32nd in pass attempts. But there needs to be more emphasis on the grain of salt. Watch the film and you’ll see, quite clearly, that Clady is a good football player. He just is. The numbers suggest he’s a bottom-feeder; the film shows he’s a top-feeder.

To judge Clady, or any offensive lineman, solely on his “sacks allowed” is akin to judging quarterbacks on interceptions. Fewer negative plays does not equal better performance. Alex Smith threw five interceptions last season; Tom Brady threw 12. But because quarterbacks can be portrayed through multiple statistical categories, no one in their right mind would argue that Smith was a better quarterback than Brady. Smith threw for 3,144 yards; Brady threw for 5,235. Smith had 17 touchdowns; Brady had 39.

Unfortunately, offensive linemen have no other statistics. Sure, there are the little-known rushing stats by field lane (the Broncos when running left last season had 67 power runs, 22 runs of 10-plus yards and 19 negative plays, which are solid all-around numbers), but those are vague and often misleading. For example, a lot of runs to the left are set up by a right guard’s pull block. How is that depicted in the stats?

Many football statistics are circumstantial and/or influenced by a multitude of factors. What’s important is to trust how a player – especially an offensive lineman – looks on film and make that the backbone of evaluation. Because this is what quality front offices do, don’t be surprised if Denver’s “mistake-prone” left tackle soon becomes one of the highest-paid players at his position



http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2...or-ryan-clady/
Good Post. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:01 AM   #46
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OK someone else's turn to quote the long article and add a two word observation.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:06 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by Bronco Rob View Post
Statistics Don’t Tell Story for Ryan Clady



By ANDY BENOIT May 22, 2012, 6:00 am



Reports about a possible contract extension for Broncos left tackle Ryan Clady recently led to a wave of arguments that his performance had been declining. Those arguments aren’t flawed, but their main points of evidence are.

In truth, Clady’s performance has declined. As a first-round rookie in 2008, he instantly proved to be football’s most athletic left tackle, if not football’s best left tackle. His 2009 season was equally impressive. In the spring of 2010, however, Clady tore his patellar tendon in a pickup basketball game. He didn’t miss any regular-season action, but he clearly didn’t have the same explosiveness. Last season, he regained much of his original form, but he was also mistake-prone.

This is where the flawed evidence comes in. ESPN.com recently got statistical to highlight Clady’s 2011 woes. In 16 starts, according to Stats L.L.C., Clady allowed a career-high nine sacks and was penalized 12 times. Since allowing just a half-sack as a rookie, Clady has given up 24.5 sacks over the past three years.

Here’s the problem: “sacks allowed” is a respectable statistic, but only if taken with a grain of salt. The people at Stats who track and grade game action are required to record the result of a play, not what actually happened on a play. In Clady’s case, many of his allowed sacks were a consequence of Tim Tebow’s running around to buy time. Sure, the man Clady blocked may have gotten the sack, but Clady successfully blocked for an entire seven-step drop; Tebow just turned it into a 13-step drop.

Another caveat: a “sacks allowed” stat can show that a talented left tackle was beaten by a talented edge rusher one or two times, but it can’t show that that talented left tackle singlehandedly kept the talented edge rusher at bay on the other 30-something dropbacks. Sometimes what’s more important than what a player did on a play was what a player was asked to do. Last seaon, the Broncos were often able to ask their left tackle to face the opposing team’s top pass rusher with no tight end help or even a chip block.

This is not meant to be a defense of Ryan Clady. Although Clady did improve as a run blocker in 2011, his overall play has indeed dipped a bit from his first two years. Twelve penalties are far too many, and so are nine sacks when considering that Denver ranked 32nd in pass attempts. But there needs to be more emphasis on the grain of salt. Watch the film and you’ll see, quite clearly, that Clady is a good football player. He just is. The numbers suggest he’s a bottom-feeder; the film shows he’s a top-feeder.

To judge Clady, or any offensive lineman, solely on his “sacks allowed” is akin to judging quarterbacks on interceptions. Fewer negative plays does not equal better performance. Alex Smith threw five interceptions last season; Tom Brady threw 12. But because quarterbacks can be portrayed through multiple statistical categories, no one in their right mind would argue that Smith was a better quarterback than Brady. Smith threw for 3,144 yards; Brady threw for 5,235. Smith had 17 touchdowns; Brady had 39.

Unfortunately, offensive linemen have no other statistics. Sure, there are the little-known rushing stats by field lane (the Broncos when running left last season had 67 power runs, 22 runs of 10-plus yards and 19 negative plays, which are solid all-around numbers), but those are vague and often misleading. For example, a lot of runs to the left are set up by a right guard’s pull block. How is that depicted in the stats?

Many football statistics are circumstantial and/or influenced by a multitude of factors. What’s important is to trust how a player – especially an offensive lineman – looks on film and make that the backbone of evaluation. Because this is what quality front offices do, don’t be surprised if Denver’s “mistake-prone” left tackle soon becomes one of the highest-paid players at his position



http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2...or-ryan-clady/
cool beans
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:20 AM   #48
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Would be interesting to see how many of those sacks and penalties came 4+ seconds after the snap.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:25 AM   #49
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I'll bet he is in the probowl this year due to manning. I think he is an average starting KT that doesn't kill you but isn't great either. He will look great this year thanks to his HOF QB.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:39 AM   #50
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I'll bet he is in the probowl this year due to manning. I think he is an average starting KT that doesn't kill you but isn't great either. He will look great this year thanks to his HOF QB.
Clady is a pro-bowl quality RT but when you have a QB that holds the ball way too long it going to make any Oline look bad. it's like CBs,they can only effectively cover a WR for so long.
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