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Old 05-27-2011, 01:04 PM   #151
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Originally Posted by baja View Post
You guys crack me up with your knee jerk reactions jumping to protect who knows what.


Fact; The market for illegal drugs in in the prosperous United States - depute that

Fact; Assault weapons used by drug gangs used to kill one another plus some collateral damage are manufactured in the USA and are illegal in Mexico - dispute that

I never blamed all Mexico Problems on the USA. Mexico has severe systemic problems but they are moving in the right direction. That is my position. The first requirement for a discussion is to understand your opponents position. I have stated mine more that once but you continue to misrepresent my position.


You are the one who misrepresents yourself.

FACT: there are still thousands and thousands of illegals crossing the border from Mexico into the US for a better life for themselves and their families. Until you dispute this fact, the rest of your social agenda is gibberish IMHO.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:06 PM   #152
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hey our 3rd world status for labor ratings is going to make us equal soon.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:07 PM   #153
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You are the one who misrepresents yourself.

FACT: there are still thousands and thousands of illegals crossing the border from Mexico into the US for a better life for themselves and their families. Until you dispute this fact, the rest of your social agenda is gibberish IMHO.
That is an issue for another thread. There are complex reasons for the migration. It is not all bad for the USA and it is not all good for Mexico. You see only the part of the issue that affects you, you know the part that makes you afraid.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:09 PM   #154
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Wake me up when we are in a free society.
do you know how badly this statement contradicts your very next statement?

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I have seen things done to people that you wouldn't believe. It's all condoned because nobody gives a **** about the poor.
On one and you say there's no such thing as a free society and in the very next statement you talk about the ills of a free society.

Oh the irony, oh the travesty of your position!
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:10 PM   #155
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That is an issue for another thread. There are complex reasons for the migration. It is not all bad for the USA and it is not all good for Mexico. You see only the part of the issue that affects you, you know the part that makes you afraid.


yet more bs for baja, congrats on being two faced.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:29 PM   #156
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Is this the United Staes fault?
Mexico City (CNN) -- While an estimated 10,000 women are victims of human trafficking in Mexico's capital, there were only 40 investigations of the crime and three convictions in the city last year, according to a report issued this week.
The discrepancy is an "alarming figure" that shows a need to improve laws and policies, according to a study on human trafficking and sexual exploitation from Mexico City's human rights commission, which calls the phenomenon a "new form of slavery."
"The authorities are not investigating, nor are they asking witnesses," said Eva Reyes, investigation coordinator at the Antonio de Montesinos Center for Social and Cultural Studies, one of the partners of the study.
Cultural norms and social stigma prevent people from realizing that many prostitutes lingering in dark alleys of Mexico City are victims, officials said as they presented the report Wednesday.
"They are seen as people who are doing it freely. That is the first obstacle to justice," Reyes said.
More on modern-day slavery: The CNN Freedom Project
Authorities in Mexico City announced Monday that they had rescued 62 victims of a forced-prostitution ring -- including a 13-year-old girl.
Five men and two women who police say ran the ring were arrested after an investigation that started when a minor involved reported the suspects to authorities.
One victim told investigators that she was forced into prostitution in Mexico City after meeting two men in Oaxaca, a city more than 460 kilometers (288 miles) away.
"After chatting with her, the victim told him that she was a domestic worker and the accused offered her a more comfortable life with well-paid work, and in a second encounter he convinced her to come live with him," the statement said.
Such approaches are a common tactic for those involved in human trafficking, who frequently target women and girls in smaller cities outside the capital, Reyes said.
In the southern border state of Chiapas, Central American women are frequently a target, Reyes said.
But regardless of where victims are recruited, she said, they often pass through -- or end up -- in Mexico City, a sprawling metropolis of more than 21 million people.
"In one case, 107 trafficking victims, both Mexican and foreign citizens, were freed from a factory disguised as a drug rehabilitation center in Mexico City; many of them had been kidnapped, and all were subjected to forced labor," according to 2010 report on human trafficking from the U.S. State Department.
The State Department report noted that authorities had conducted raids on brothels suspected in human trafficking and a special prosecutor for trafficking in Mexico City sentenced one offender to 10 years in prison last year, "the first sentence under Mexico's federal anti-trafficking law and Mexico City's local anti-trafficking law."
But more needs to be done, this week's human rights commission report said.
"The high number of women who are victims of human trafficking are not achieving access to judicial resources and because of this, the large majority of these incidents remain in impunity. ... Their rights remain unprotected," it said.
CNN's Catherine E. Shoichet contributed to this report
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:37 PM   #157
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Forget Mexico. If you haven't been to Costa Rica yet do yourself a favor. There is some petty theft going on in Jan Jose but no drug war going on like Mexico.

You can enjoy both beaches Carribean and Pacific in the same trip! They are just a quick cheep flight away. Costa Rica is small but the majority of it is public lands! Amazing wildlife, lovely people, abundant fishing (they haven't over fished it like baja), hot springs that will blow you away (See Tobacon). I could go on and on. Heck Costa Rica doesn't even have an army.

Forget the war zone in Mexico. Those son of a b****es will knock you over the head for 10 bucks. The little thieves have been doing that for decades. If it's not the thieves that get you the damn police will jack you!

Do yourselves and your families a favor. Head to Costa Rica! Yah man!
Meck, my brother has a condo on the Pacific side right on the ocean ( playa Flamingo) and it is very beautiful! We went to The Tabcon resort and hot springs and it was really totally awesome! ( and an interesting drive to get there). I think the Volcano ( which erupts almost everyday) is in the second Jurrasic Park movie? Costa Rica is a great place to go, they treat Americans very well, and I can't wait to go back! Great place, inho.
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Old 05-27-2011, 02:47 PM   #158
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This is seized armored vehicle being used by Mexico Drug Gangs.

Authorities in Jalisco, Mexico, recently seized this tricked-out 2011 Ford F-350 Super Duty truck, above, that had been transformed by drug gang members into an obviously DIY armored vehicle. The steel-plated "Z Monster," as the truck was called, could fit 20 men and was outfitted with a rotating machine gun turret.

Drug gangs are crafting armored "narcotanks" in order to battle the Mexican military--and each other. Security forces complain they're battling gangs that are better armed than they are. In Colombia, gangs have been caught using homemade submarines, and other cartels use ultra-light airplanes to transport drugs to the United States without grabbing the attention of the Border Patrol

Rest of the story:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_theloo...eize-narcotank.
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:04 PM   #159
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This is seized armored vehicle being used by Mexico Drug Gangs.

Authorities in Jalisco, Mexico, recently seized this tricked-out 2011 Ford F-350 Super Duty truck, above, that had been transformed by drug gang members into an obviously DIY armored vehicle. The steel-plated "Z Monster," as the truck was called, could fit 20 men and was outfitted with a rotating machine gun turret.

Drug gangs are crafting armored "narcotanks" in order to battle the Mexican military--and each other. Security forces complain they're battling gangs that are better armed than they are. In Colombia, gangs have been caught using homemade submarines, and other cartels use ultra-light airplanes to transport drugs to the United States without grabbing the attention of the Border Patrol

Rest of the story:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_theloo...eize-narcotank.
A favorite trick here is the drug cartels steal a gringo's light plane parked at some lonely airstrip in rural Mexico fly the drugs to the Atizona dessert and burn the plane when unloaded.

T

A friend told me a story that happened to a friend of his. The uy had just flown to his paradise home on a lonely beach somewhere in Baja Sur. There was a landing strip nearby the cluster of homes. the guy was awakened by the sound of a plane one night and commented to his wife, "That sounds like my plane". Sure enough he went out just in time to see his plane taking off. He figured the people he filed his flight plan with tipped of the drug cartel and they stole the plane. The drug cartels have so much money that is a poor country like Mexico they are almost impossible to stop. Currently the government is using the military to combat.


The drug cartels are a huge problem here never said they were not but to say all of Mexico is unsafe is just not true.
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:12 PM   #160
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A favorite trick here is the drug cartels steal a gringo's light plane parked at some lonely airstrip in rural Mexico fly the drugs to the Atizona dessert and burn the plane when unloaded.

T

A friend told me a story that happened to a friend of his. The uy had just flown to his paradise home on a lonely beach somewhere in Baja Sur. There was a landing strip nearby the cluster of homes. the guy was awakened by the sound of a plane one night and commented to his wife, "That sounds like my plane". Sure enough he went out just in time to see his plane taking off. He figured the people he filed his flight plan with tipped of the drug cartel and they stole the plane. The drug cartels have so much money that is a poor country like Mexico they are almost impossible to stop. Currently the government is using the military to combat.


The drug cartels are a huge problem here never said they were not but to say all of Mexico is unsafe is just not true.
I am not saying that Mexico as whole is unsafe, but there are certain areas that are reaching level of violence and corruption that they are boarding on failed state status. Hopefully there is Colombia style correction to get the country better.
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:27 PM   #161
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I am not saying that Mexico as whole is unsafe, but there are certain areas that are reaching level of violence and corruption that they are boarding on failed state status. Hopefully there is Colombia style correction to get the country better.
Thankfully the military is starting to get things under control for example Tijuana is much safer than two years ago. The worst is Ciudad Juarez, might be the most dangerous city in the world right now. It's 1 mile from El Paso Texas and about 1500 miles from Cabo

http://www.funjet.com/about/mexico-t...rt.asp?plCode=
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Old 05-27-2011, 04:04 PM   #162
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Don't know if this has been posted before because I'm not following this thread but when I clicked on the OT-Oklahoma Vigilante justice thread and saw the post about Nationmaster website on crimes per country I did a double take and thought of this Baja thread. Site appears legit but their results are nonetheless interesting to say the least. Columbia & Venezuela way safer than New Zealand, Finland and Denmark, sure goes against current general stereotype.


Rank Countries Amount
# 1 Dominica: 113.822 per 1,000 people
# 2 New Zealand: 105.881 per 1,000 people
# 3 Finland: 101.526 per 1,000 people
# 4 Denmark: 92.8277 per 1,000 people
# 5 Chile: 88.226 per 1,000 people
# 6 United Kingdom: 85.5517 per 1,000 people
# 7 Montserrat: 80.3982 per 1,000 people
# 8 United States: 80.0645 per 1,000 people
# 9 Netherlands: 79.5779 per 1,000 people
# 10 South Africa: 77.1862 per 1,000 people
# 11 Germany: 75.9996 per 1,000 people
# 12 Canada: 75.4921 per 1,000 people
# 13 Norway: 71.8639 per 1,000 people
# 14 France: 62.1843 per 1,000 people
# 15 Seychelles: 52.9265 per 1,000 people
# 16 Hungary: 44.9763 per 1,000 people
# 17 Estonia: 43.3601 per 1,000 people
# 18 Czech Republic: 38.2257 per 1,000 people
# 19 Italy: 37.9633 per 1,000 people
# 20 Switzerland: 36.1864 per 1,000 people
# 21 Portugal: 34.3833 per 1,000 people
# 22 Slovenia: 33.6236 per 1,000 people
# 23 Poland: 32.8573 per 1,000 people
# 24 Korea, South: 31.7267 per 1,000 people
# 25 Mauritius: 29.1982 per 1,000 people
# 26 Zimbabwe: 28.8753 per 1,000 people
# 27 Lithuania: 22.8996 per 1,000 people
# 28 Spain: 22.8867 per 1,000 people
# 29 Latvia: 21.921 per 1,000 people
# 30 Uruguay: 21.7017 per 1,000 people
# 31 Russia: 20.5855 per 1,000 people
# 32 Ireland: 20.2376 per 1,000 people
# 33 Bulgaria: 19.9886 per 1,000 people
# 34 Japan: 19.177 per 1,000 people
# 35 Romania: 16.4812 per 1,000 people
# 36 Slovakia: 16.3537 per 1,000 people
# 37 Jamaica: 14.3231 per 1,000 people
# 38 Belarus: 13.1592 per 1,000 people
# 39 Mexico: 12.8406 per 1,000 people
# 40 Tunisia: 12.5634 per 1,000 people
# 41 Costa Rica: 11.9788 per 1,000 people
# 42 Ukraine: 11.7793 per 1,000 people
# 43 Hong Kong: 11.6817 per 1,000 people
# 44 Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of: 9.689 per 1,000 people
# 45 Greece: 9.6347 per 1,000 people
# 46 Venezuela: 9.307 per 1,000 people
# 47 Thailand: 8.80422 per 1,000 people
# 48 Moldova: 8.58967 per 1,000 people
# 49 Kyrgyzstan: 7.50486 per 1,000 people
# 50 Malaysia: 6.97921 per 1,000 people
# 51 Qatar: 6.76437 per 1,000 people
# 52 Zambia: 5.27668 per 1,000 people
# 53 Colombia: 4.98654 per 1,000 people
# 54 Turkey: 4.11252 per 1,000 people
# 55 Armenia: 4.03889 per 1,000 people
# 56 Georgia: 3.21338 per 1,000 people
# 57 Papua New Guinea: 2.39711 per 1,000 people
# 58 Azerbaijan: 1.76416 per 1,000 people
# 59 India: 1.63352 per 1,000 people
# 60 Yemen: 1.16109 per 1,000 people

Weighted average: 33.7 per 1,000 people

Last edited by El Minion; 05-27-2011 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 05-27-2011, 05:06 PM   #163
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Don't know if this has been posted before because I'm not following this thread but when I clicked on the OT-Oklahoma Vigilante justice thread and saw the post about Nationmaster website on crimes per country I did a double take and thought of this Baja thread. Site appears legit but their results are nonetheless interesting to say the least. Columbia & Venezuela way safer than New Zealand, Finland and Denmark, sure goes against current general stereotype.

Or those countries have better open reporting systems.
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Old 05-27-2011, 08:58 PM   #164
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Or those countries have better open reporting systems.
I agree this is a factor, to what degree I don't know.
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Old 05-29-2011, 12:10 PM   #165
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Is this the United Staes fault?
Mexico City (CNN) -- While an estimated 10,000 women are victims of human trafficking in Mexico's capital, there were only 40 investigations of the crime and three convictions in the city last year, according to a report issued this week.
The discrepancy is an "alarming figure" that shows a need to improve laws and policies, according to a study on human trafficking and sexual exploitation from Mexico City's human rights commission, which calls the phenomenon a "new form of slavery."
"The authorities are not investigating, nor are they asking witnesses," said Eva Reyes, investigation coordinator at the Antonio de Montesinos Center for Social and Cultural Studies, one of the partners of the study.
Cultural norms and social stigma prevent people from realizing that many prostitutes lingering in dark alleys of Mexico City are victims, officials said as they presented the report Wednesday.
"They are seen as people who are doing it freely. That is the first obstacle to justice," Reyes said.
More on modern-day slavery: The CNN Freedom Project
Authorities in Mexico City announced Monday that they had rescued 62 victims of a forced-prostitution ring -- including a 13-year-old girl.
Five men and two women who police say ran the ring were arrested after an investigation that started when a minor involved reported the suspects to authorities.
One victim told investigators that she was forced into prostitution in Mexico City after meeting two men in Oaxaca, a city more than 460 kilometers (288 miles) away.
"After chatting with her, the victim told him that she was a domestic worker and the accused offered her a more comfortable life with well-paid work, and in a second encounter he convinced her to come live with him," the statement said.
Such approaches are a common tactic for those involved in human trafficking, who frequently target women and girls in smaller cities outside the capital, Reyes said.
In the southern border state of Chiapas, Central American women are frequently a target, Reyes said.
But regardless of where victims are recruited, she said, they often pass through -- or end up -- in Mexico City, a sprawling metropolis of more than 21 million people.
"In one case, 107 trafficking victims, both Mexican and foreign citizens, were freed from a factory disguised as a drug rehabilitation center in Mexico City; many of them had been kidnapped, and all were subjected to forced labor," according to 2010 report on human trafficking from the U.S. State Department.
The State Department report noted that authorities had conducted raids on brothels suspected in human trafficking and a special prosecutor for trafficking in Mexico City sentenced one offender to 10 years in prison last year, "the first sentence under Mexico's federal anti-trafficking law and Mexico City's local anti-trafficking law."
But more needs to be done, this week's human rights commission report said.
"The high number of women who are victims of human trafficking are not achieving access to judicial resources and because of this, the large majority of these incidents remain in impunity. ... Their rights remain unprotected," it said.
CNN's Catherine E. Shoichet contributed to this report
Some large US companies/banks have been implicated in human trafficking. Try a google.
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Old 05-29-2011, 12:13 PM   #166
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One big part of the solution to the violence on the border would be to legalize cocaine and heroin.

This is not to say that drug use is good -- but it's much better to have the problem out in the open.

Legalizing drugs will eliminate at one fell swoop the profit motive that drives the cartels, the money laundering -- not to mention the CIA slush funds that pay for all manner of black ops.

Legalization will help restore our civil liberties.

'
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Old 05-29-2011, 12:24 PM   #167
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With regard to the question about US involvement in human trafficking -- check this out. This story was posted last December.

You tax dollars are paying for sex slave operations.

It's yet another reason to end the wars.

MHG


Wikileaks Reveals U.S. Tax Dollars Fund Child Sex Slavery in Afghanistan

http://news.change.org/stories/wikil...in-afghanistan
by Amanda Kloer · December 08, 2010


The now infamous Wikileaks recently released a cable from Afghanistan revealing U.S. government contractor DynCorp threw a party for Afghan security recruits featuring trafficked boys as the entertainment. Bacha bazi is the Afghan tradition of "boy play" where young boys are dressed up in women's clothing, forced to dance for leering men, and then sold for sex to the highest bidder. Apparently this is the sort of "entertainment" funded by your tax dollars when DynCorp is in charge of security in Afghanistan.

DynCorp is a government contractor which has been providing training for Afghan security and police forces for several years. Though the company is about as transparent as a lead-coated rock, most reports claim over 95% of their budget comes from U.S. taxpayers. That's the same budget that DynCorp used to pay for a party in Kunduz Province for some Afghan police trainees. The entertainment for the evening was bacha bazi boys, whose pimps were paid so the boys would sing and dance for the recruits and then be raped by them afterward. That's your tax dollars at work -- fighting terrorism and extremism in Afghnistan by trafficking little boys for sex with cops-in-training.

In fact, the evidence linking DynCorp to bacha bazi was so damning, Afghan Minister of the Interior Hanif Atmar tried to quash the story. Upon hearing a journalist was investigating DynCorp and the U.S. government's funding of the sex trafficking of young boys in Afghanistan, Atmar warned any publication of the story would "endanger lives," and requested the U.S. suppress the story. Atmar admitted he had arrested eleven Afghans nationals as "facilitators" of the bacha bazi party. But he was only charging them with "purchasing a service from a child," which is illegal under Sharia law and the civil code. And in this case "services" is not used as a euphemism for sex; so far, no one is being held accountable for the young boys whose rapes were paid for by the U.S. taxpayers.

As if this story couldn't get any more outrageous, Atmar went on to say that if news of the incident got out, he was "worried about the image of foreign mentors". In other words, why should something as piddling as the humiliation, objectification, sale, and rape of some children tarnish the good name of DynCorp and all the work (read: money) they're doing in Afghanistan? After all, bacha bazi is growing in popularity in Afghanistan, especially in areas like Kunduz. Why shouldn't U.S. government contractors be able to win local favor by pimping young boys?

Of course, this isn't the first time DynCorp has used U.S. tax dollars to support sex trafficking. In Bosnia in 1999, Kathryn Bolkovac was fired from the company after blowing the whistle on DynCorp's staffers pimping out girls as young as 12 from Eastern European countries. DynCorp settled a lawsuit involving Bolkovac, and her story was recently featured in The Whistleblower, where she was portrayed by Rachel Weiss. It's a happy ending for one DynCorp whistle blower, but will there be a Bolkovac in Afghanistan?

It's time American taxpayers demanded a zero tolerance policy on our money being used to support child sex trafficking overseas. Tell the UN Mission to Afghanistan the time has come to crack down on those who buy and sell boys in bacha bazi, whether they're Afghans or U.S. government contractors, security personnel or citizens. No one should be able to traffic children so sex and get away with it, and that includes repeat offender DynCorp. We have a right to demand our tax dollars go to fight trafficking, not support it. And we have a right to demand the U.S. government and their contractors be held accountable for exploiting the boys of Afghanistan.
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Old 05-30-2011, 01:18 PM   #168
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If you guys want the real stories of what is happening in Mexico then cruise this website. It's the orangemane for Americans living in Baja.

Odysseus....I'm pointing this forum out to you specifically since you said you are considering living in Mexico. Years ago I considered buying a place in Mexico and I thank God I did not.

Baja can sugar coat what's happening in Mexico all he wants. The hundreds of people living down there who post on this forum tell a much different story.

Here is just one. http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=52944

Pretty common to get hustled by the police. http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=52510 It's funny that a poster would even justify it by saying "You should know better than to carry money in Baja".

Last edited by Meck77; 05-30-2011 at 01:44 PM..
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Old 05-30-2011, 01:35 PM   #169
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Here's the place you call a desert waste land (from the site you linked).

http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=53170
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Old 05-30-2011, 01:37 PM   #170
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Travel Warning
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Bureau of Consular Affairs

Mexico
April 22, 2011

The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens traveling to and living in Mexico about the security situation in Mexico. This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning for Mexico dated September 10, 2010 to consolidate and update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government personnel.

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day for study, tourism or business and at least one million U.S. citizens who live in Mexico. The Mexican government makes a considerable effort to protect U.S. citizens and other visitors to major tourist destinations. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime reported in the border region and in areas along major trafficking routes. Nevertheless, crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere. While most victims of violence are Mexican citizens associated with criminal activity, the security situation poses serious risks for U.S. citizens as well.

It is imperative that you understand the risks involved in travel to Mexico and how best to avoid dangerous situations. Common-sense precautions such as visiting only legitimate business and tourist areas during daylight hours, and avoiding areas where criminal activity might occur, can help ensure that travel to Mexico is safe and enjoyable.
General Conditions

Since 2006, the Mexican government has engaged in an extensive effort to combat transnational criminal organizations (TCOs). The TCOs, meanwhile, have been engaged in a vicious struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. According to Government of Mexico figures, 34,612 people have been killed in narcotics-related violence in Mexico since December 2006. More than 15,000 narcotics-related homicides occurred in 2010, an increase of almost two-thirds compared to 2009. Most of those killed in narcotics-related violence since 2006 have been members of TCOs. However, innocent persons have also been killed as have Mexican law enforcement and military personnel.

There is no evidence that U.S. tourists have been targeted by criminal elements due to their citizenship. Nonetheless, while in Mexico you should be aware of your surroundings at all times and exercise particular caution in unfamiliar areas. Bystanders, including U.S. citizens, have been injured or killed in violent incidents in various parts of the country, especially, but not exclusively in the northern border region, demonstrating the heightened risk of violence throughout Mexico. TCOs, meanwhile, engage in a wide-range of criminal activities that can directly impact U.S. citizens, including kidnapping, armed car-jacking, and extortion that can directly impact U.S. citizens. The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico increased from 35 in 2007 to 111 in 2010.

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat the TCOs. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways may encounter government checkpoints, which are often staffed by military personnel. You are advised to cooperate with personnel at government checkpoints and mobile military patrols. TCOs have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, and killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.

Violence along Mexican roads and highways is a particular concern in the northern border region. As a result, effective July 15, 2010, the U.S. Mission in Mexico imposed restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel. U.S. government employees and their families are not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America. Travel by vehicle is permitted between Hermosillo and Nogales.

While violent incidents have occurred at all hours of the day and night on both modern toll ("cuotas") highways and on secondary roads, they have occurred most frequently at night and on isolated roads. To reduce risk, you are strongly urged to travel only during daylight hours throughout Mexico, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads whenever possible. For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

Due to ongoing violence and persistent security concerns, you are urged to defer non-essential travel to the states of Tamaulipas and Michoacán, and to parts of the states of Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Sinaloa, Durango, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco. Details on these locations, and other areas in which travelers should exercise caution, are below.
Violence along the U.S. - Mexico Border

You should be especially aware of safety and security concerns when visiting the northern border states of Northern Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. Much of the country's narcotics-related violence has occurred in the border region. More than a third of all U.S. citizens killed in Mexico in 2010 whose deaths were reported to the U.S. government were killed in the border cities of Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana. Narcotics-related homicide rates in the border states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas have increased dramatically in the past two years.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents. Most victims who complied with carjackers at these checkpoints have reported that they were not physically harmed. Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including bumping moving vehicles to force them to stop and running vehicles off the road at high speed. There are some indications that criminals have particularly targeted newer and larger vehicles with U.S. license plates, especially dark-colored SUVs. However, victims' vehicles have included those with both Mexican and American registration and vary in type from late model SUVs and pick-up trucks to old sedans.

If you make frequent visits to border cities, you should vary your route and park in well-lighted, guarded and paid parking lots. Exercise caution when entering or exiting vehicles.

Large firefights between rival TCOs or TCOs and Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico, especially in the border region. Firefights have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. The location and timing of future armed engagements cannot be predicted. You are urged to defer travel to those areas mentioned in this Travel Warning and to exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the northern border region.

Northern Baja California: Targeted TCO assassinations continue to take place in Northern Baja California, including the city of Tijuana. You should exercise caution in this area, particularly at night. In late 2010, turf battles between criminal groups proliferated and resulted in numerous assassinations in areas of Tijuana frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours throughout the city. In one such incident, an American citizen was shot and seriously wounded.

Nogales and Northern Sonora: You are advised to exercise caution in the city of Nogales. Northern Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades, and can be extremely dangerous for travelers. The U.S. Consulate requires that armored vehicles are used for official travel in the consular district of Nogales, including certain areas within the city of Nogales. The region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and from Caborca north, including the towns of Saric, Tubutama and Altar, and the eastern edge of Sonora bordering Chihuahua, are known centers of illegal activity. You should defer non-essential travel to these areas.

You are advised to exercise caution when visiting the coastal town of Puerto Peñasco. In the past year there have been multiple incidents of TCO-related violence, including the shooting of the city's police chief. U.S. citizens visiting Puerto Peñasco are urged to cross the border at Lukeville, AZ, to limit driving through Mexico and to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours.

Ciudad Juarez and Chihuahua: The situation in the state of Chihuahua, specifically Ciudad Juarez, is of special concern. Ciudad Juarez has the highest murder rate in Mexico. Mexican authorities report that more than 3,100 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez in 2010. Three persons associated with the Consulate General were murdered in March, 2010. You should defer non-essential travel to Ciudad Juarez and to the Guadalupe Bravo area southeast of Ciudad Juarez. U.S. citizens should also defer non-essential travel to the northwest quarter of the state of Chihuahua. From the United States, these areas are often reached through the Columbus, NM, and Fabens and Fort Hancock, TX, ports-of-entry. In both areas, U.S. citizens have been victims of narcotics-related violence. There have been incidents of narcotics-related violence in the vicinity of the Copper Canyon in Chihuahua.

Durango, Coahuila and Zacatecas: Between 2006 and 2010, the number of narcotics-related murders in the State of Durango increased dramatically. Several areas in the state have seen sharp increases in violence and remain volatile and unpredictable. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the cities of Durango and Gomez Palacio. You should defer non-essential travel to these cities.

The State of Coahuila has also experienced an increase in violent crimes and narcotics-related murders. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the area known as "La Laguna", including the city of Torreon, and the city of Saltillo within the state. You should defer non-essential travel to this area, as well as to the cities of Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña due to frequent incidents of TCO-related violence.

The northwestern portion of the state of Zacatecas has become notably dangerous and insecure. Robberies and carjackings are occurring with increased frequency and both local authorities and residents have reported a surge in observed TCO activity. This area is remote, and local authorities are unable to regularly patrol it or quickly respond to incidents that occur there. The Consulate General in Monterrey restricts travel for U.S. government employees to the city of Fresnillo and the area extending northwest from Fresnillo along Highway 45 (Fresnillo-Sombrete) between Highways 44 and 49. In addition, highway 49 northwards from Fresnillo through Durango and in to Chihuahua is isolated and should be considered dangerous. You should defer non-essential travel to these areas.

Monterrey and Nuevo Leon: The level of violence and insecurity in Monterrey remains elevated. Local police and private patrols do not have the capacity to deter criminal elements or respond effectively to security incidents. As a result of a Department of State assessment of the overall security situation, on September 10, 2010, the Consulate General in Monterrey became a partially unaccompanied post with no minor dependents of U.S. government employees permitted.

TCOs continue to use stolen cars and trucks to create roadblocks or "blockades" on major thoroughfares, preventing the military or police from responding to criminal activity in Monterrey and the surrounding areas. Travelers on the highways between Monterrey and the United States (notably through Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros/Reynosa) have been targeted for robbery that has resulted in violence. They have also been caught in incidents of gunfire between criminals and Mexican law enforcement. In 2010, TCOs kidnapped guests out of reputable hotels in the downtown Monterrey area, blocking off adjoining streets to prevent law enforcement response. TCOs have also regularly attacked local government facilities, prisons and police stations, and engaged in public shootouts with the military and between themselves. Pedestrians and innocent bystanders have been killed in these incidents.

The number of kidnappings and disappearances in Monterrey, and increasingly throughout Monterrey's consular district, is of particular concern. Both the local and expatriate communities have been victimized and local law enforcement has provided little to no response. In addition, police have been implicated in some of these incidents. Travelers and residents are strongly advised to lower their profile and avoid displaying any evidence of wealth that might draw attention.

Tamaulipas: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas. In an effort to prevent the military or police from responding to criminal activity, TCOs have set up roadblocks or "blockades" in various parts of Nuevo Laredo in which armed gunmen carjack and rob unsuspecting drivers. These blockades occur without warning and at all times, day and night. The Consulate General prohibits employees from entering the entertainment zone in Nuevo Laredo known as "Boys Town" because of concerns about violent crime in that area. U.S. government employees are currently restricted from travelling on the highway between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey, as well as on Mexican Highway 2 towards Reynosa or Ciudad Acuña due to security concerns.

Be aware of the risks posed by armed robbery and carjacking on state highways throughout Tamaulipas. In January 2011, a U.S. citizen was murdered in what appears to have been a failed carjacking attempt. While no highway routes through Tamaulipas are considered safe, many of the crimes reported to the U.S. Consulate General in Matamoros took place along the Matamoros-Tampico highway, particularly around San Fernando and the area north of Tampico.
Crime and Violence in Other Parts of Mexico

While security concerns are particularly acute in the northern border region, you should be aware of situations that could affect your safety in other parts of Mexico.

Sinaloa and Southern Sonora: One of Mexico's most powerful TCOs is based in the state of Sinaloa. Since 2006, more homicides have occurred in the state's capital city of Culiacan than in any other city in Mexico, with the exception of Ciudad Juarez. You should defer non-essential travel to Culiacan and exercise extreme caution when visiting the rest of the state. Travel off the toll roads in remote areas of Sinaloa is especially dangerous and should be avoided.

In the last year, the city of Mazatlan has experienced a level of violence, primarily confrontations between TCOs, not seen before. In 2010 there were over 300 narcotics-related murders within the city, compared to fewer than 100 in 2009. You are encouraged to visit Mazatlan during daylight hours and limit the time you spend outside tourist centers. Exercise caution during late night and early morning hours when most violent crimes occur.

Highway robbery and carjacking are ongoing security concerns for travelers on the Mexican toll road Highway 15 in Sonora and on Maxipista Benito Juarez in Sinaloa. These highways are known to be particularly dangerous at night when roadside robberies occur. When traveling in Sinaloa, U.S. government employees are required to use armored vehicles and may only travel in daylight hours.

San Luis Potosi: In February 2011, one U.S. government employee was killed and another wounded when they were attacked in their U.S. government vehicle on Highway 57 near Santa Maria del Rio. The incident remains under investigation. Cartel violence and highway lawlessness have increased throughout the state and are a continuing security concern. All official U.S. government employees and their families have been advised to defer travel on the entire stretch of highway 57D in San Luis Potosi as well as travel in the state east of highway 57D towards Tamaulipas. You should defer non-essential travel in these areas.

Nayarit and Jalisco: Official U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to Colotlan, Jalisco, and Yahualica, Jalisco, both near the Zacatecas border, because of an increasingly volatile security situation. Concerns include roadblocks placed by individuals posing as police or military personnel and recent gun battles between rival TCOs involving automatic weapons. You should defer non-essential travel to these cities. In addition, the border areas between Jalisco state and the states of Zacatecas and Michoacán, as well as southern Nayarit state including the city of Tepic, have been sites of violence and crime involving TCOs. You should exercise extreme caution when traveling in these areas. Due to recent TCO-mounted road blockades between the Guadalajara airport and the Guadalajara metropolitan areas, U.S. government employees are only authorized to travel between Guadalajara and the Guadalajara Airport during daylight hours.

Michoacán: You should defer non-essential travel to the State of Michoacán, which is home to another of Mexico's most dangerous TCOs, "La Familia". Attacks on government officials and law enforcement and military personnel, and other incidents of TCO-related violence, have occurred throughout Michoacan, including in and around the capital of Morelia and in the vicinity of the world famous butterfly sanctuaries in the eastern part of the State.

Guerrero and Morelos: You should exercise extreme caution when traveling in the northwestern part of the state of Guerrero, which has a strong TCO presence. Do not take the dangerous, isolated road through Ciudad Altamirano to the beach resorts of Ixtapa and Zihuatanejo and exercise caution traveling on the coastal road between Acapulco and Ixtapa due to the risk of roadblocks and carjackings. Numerous incidents of narcotics-related violence have occurred in the city of Cuernavaca, in the State of Morelos, a popular destination for American language students.

Downtown Acapulco and surrounding areas have seen a significant increase in narcotics-related violence in the last year. Incidents have included daylight gunfights and murders of law enforcement personnel and some have resulted in the deaths of innocent bystanders. Due to the unpredictable nature of this violence, you should exercise extreme caution when visiting downtown Acapulco. To reduce risks, tourists should not visit the downtown area at night and should remain in clearly identifiable tourist areas. In general, the popular tourist area of Diamante just south of the city has not been affected by the increasing violence.
Further Information

You are encouraged to review the U.S. Embassy's Mexico Security Update. The update contains information about recent security incidents in Mexico that could affect the safety of the traveling public.

For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see the State Department's Country Specific Information for Mexico. Information on security and travel to popular tourist destinations is also provided in the publication: Spring Break in Mexico - Know Before You Go!
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Old 05-30-2011, 01:44 PM   #171
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Here are the topics of the board;

http://forums.bajanomad.com/today.php

sure doesn't look like there is much problem in Baja. I just drove the entire Baja a couple of weeks ago ( in a red Hummer H2 no less, which is the ride of choice for the higher up drug gang members).

I live here and have for 21 years and have many friends here. I tell you it's reasonably safe. But listen to Meck the guy afraid to venture into Mexico, he knows the conditions here real well.

Oh and for you Meck please stay out of the Baja - For God's sake please stay away it's a war zone here I tell ya. So many heads rolling around in the road it's a hazard driving.
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Old 05-30-2011, 02:02 PM   #172
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And Odysseus...The fishing sucks in Baja. They've ruined it. Go to Costa Rica or somewhere in the states.

http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=38938

Some good insight to the reality of the tourism down there. It's bleak.

Last edited by Meck77; 05-30-2011 at 02:07 PM..
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Old 05-30-2011, 10:17 PM   #173
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Video: Kindergarten teacher leads children in song during shootout in Mexico
Comments (0) (389)(40)May 30, 2011 | 3:36 pm
In the video, the frightened but determined voice of a schoolteacher is heard as she attempts to maintain calm among a group of kindergartners lying on the floor before her, asking them to join her in a singalong as gunfire shatters the air outside.

The teacher refers to the children as "my love," "precious" and "little ones" during the stirring clip filmed last week in the city of Monterrey, in northern Mexico. It's gone viral, igniting once more a public debate over the government's campaign against drug gangs and earning accolades for maestra Martha Rivera Alanis, reports the Associated Press.

The Nuevo Leon state government honored Rivera for "outstanding civic courage" in a ceremony today.

The 33-year-old mother of two said she was frightened, but that her "only thought was to take their minds off that noise." The song she chose during the ordeal is a Spanish-language version of a tune popularized by the children's TV program "Barney and Friends," and makes reference to chocolate droplets falling from the sky.

Rivera filmed the video during a gunfight Friday in which five people were killed at a taxi stand in La Estanzuela, a district in south Monterrey. According to a local news site, Regioblogs, the teacher posted the video to her Facebook account and then was asked permission to have it reproduced on YouTube and linked to the site. So far the original clip has garnered more than 714,000 views

For more, see http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lapl...-drug-war.html
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Old 05-30-2011, 10:34 PM   #174
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Originally Posted by SoCalBronco View Post



Video: Kindergarten teacher leads children in song during shootout in Mexico
Comments (0) (389)(40)May 30, 2011 | 3:36 pm
In the video, the frightened but determined voice of a schoolteacher is heard as she attempts to maintain calm among a group of kindergartners lying on the floor before her, asking them to join her in a singalong as gunfire shatters the air outside.

The teacher refers to the children as "my love," "precious" and "little ones" during the stirring clip filmed last week in the city of Monterrey, in northern Mexico. It's gone viral, igniting once more a public debate over the government's campaign against drug gangs and earning accolades for maestra Martha Rivera Alanis, reports the Associated Press.

The Nuevo Leon state government honored Rivera for "outstanding civic courage" in a ceremony today.

The 33-year-old mother of two said she was frightened, but that her "only thought was to take their minds off that noise." The song she chose during the ordeal is a Spanish-language version of a tune popularized by the children's TV program "Barney and Friends," and makes reference to chocolate droplets falling from the sky.

Rivera filmed the video during a gunfight Friday in which five people were killed at a taxi stand in La Estanzuela, a district in south Monterrey. According to a local news site, Regioblogs, the teacher posted the video to her Facebook account and then was asked permission to have it reproduced on YouTube and linked to the site. So far the original clip has garnered more than 714,000 views

For more, see http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lapl...-drug-war.html
Incredible.
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Old 05-31-2011, 02:30 AM   #175
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Originally Posted by Meck77 View Post
If you guys want the real stories of what is happening in Mexico then cruise this website. It's the orangemane for Americans living in Baja.

Odysseus....I'm pointing this forum out to you specifically since you said you are considering living in Mexico. Years ago I considered buying a place in Mexico and I thank God I did not.

Baja can sugar coat what's happening in Mexico all he wants. The hundreds of people living down there who post on this forum tell a much different story.

Here is just one. http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=52944

Pretty common to get hustled by the police. http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=52510 It's funny that a poster would even justify it by saying "You should know better than to carry money in Baja".
What is happening in Mexico is the direct consequence of covert US foreign policy -- implemented by the CIA.

The only way that the huge amounts of drugs can move into the US is with the CIA's approval.

The illegal drug trade is allowed to exist -- and is managed -- why?

For a number of reasons one of which is that the large US banks -- and I mean all of them -- have come to depend on drug profits for liquidity.

An estimated $500 billion to a $trillion in drug money is laundered through US banks every year. No one knows the actual number -- 99.9% of it escapes detection.

The way to end the violence along the border and recover our civil liberties is to make cocaine, heroin and pot legal.

Check out this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9VYo...layer_embedded
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