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Old 06-26-2010, 04:00 PM   #1
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Default Some good news for California

Violent Crime in California Drops for the 3rd Year in a Row

Photo: SKD's LA Street Scenes

It wasn't just Los Angeles. The latest stats and figures from the California Department of Justice show that violent crime, once again, went down in 2009. Statewide, every category saw a decline, whether it be homicide (-8.9%), robbery (-8.6%), motor vehicle theft (-15.8%) or arson (-14.3%).

State officials are pleased that this is the third year consecutive year in which violent crime (-6.6%), property crime (-10.1%), and larceny and theft (-6.5%) rates have all declined. When you put the numbers together, that's nearly 20,000 fewer violent crimes reported than in 2006.

In 1992, when crime peaked in the state, rates were double today, declining by 58.9% for violent crime, 51.7% for property crime, and 48.5% for larceny and theft. Back then there were 1.9 million arrests. Last year there were 1.4 million.

The state's most populous counties -- all in Southern California -- all recorded what state officials are calling significant crime rate declines from 2008 to 2009:
  • Los Angeles: violent crime (-9%), property crime (-11%), and larceny and theft (-3.3%)
  • San Diego: violent crime (-2.2%), property crime (-22.5%), and larceny and theft (-14.2%)
  • Orange: violent crime (-3.6%), property crime (-10.5%), and larceny and theft (-3.7%)
  • Riverside: violent crime (-13.4%), property crime (-12.4%), and larceny and theft (-11%)
  • San Bernardino: violent crime (-4.5%), property crime (-11%), and larceny and theft (-8.7%)
"This latest drop in crime is good news for Californians and reflects well on the dedicated and courageous efforts of peace officers throughout the state," Attorney General Jerry Brown said in a statement. "Yet it is no cause for complacency. Crime remains a serious problem in California, and law enforcement officials at every level must redouble their efforts to ensure public safety."

By Zach Behrens in News on June 25, 2010 10:30 AM
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Old 06-26-2010, 04:39 PM   #2
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The one place going off right now is Santa Ana. Also illegals often don't report crimes and its been said they suffer being victims more then any other segment.

The problem is we can't afford to keep people in prison. They are overflowing because of the 3 strikes incarcerations earlier this decade.
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Old 06-26-2010, 04:44 PM   #3
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IMO the crime rates hard to measure. It could be there is less crime, or it could be someway they are counting etc etc.

In any event unless you want to blame the police when it gets worst you can't give them all the credit. I think it moves in cycles and sometimes police are powerless to stop it. They do have a tough job though, not bashing the police. Only I know some many of them, and they aren't all great people. It's hard to just give someone a bunch of credit because they have a uniform and a badge.

Still good news.
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Old 12-27-2010, 02:50 PM   #4
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Murder Rate In Los Angeles Drops To 1967 Levels


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Despite increased crime predictions due to economic hardship, the murder rate in Los Angeles has dropped to 1967 levels and the absence of a massive drug epidemic may be a key factor. For the first time in over forty years, LA is within reach of ending the year with fewer than 300 homicides, reports the LA Times.

As of Sunday afternoon, LAPD counted 291 homicides in 2010 -- a statistic that shows homicides dropping by approximately 75% from 1992 when 1,092 people were killed during the crack cocaine epidemic and in gang violence, and dropping one-third since 2007. By recent estimation, this translates into 7.5 killings per 100,000 people, according to the LA TImes, putting us in line with NYC and Phoenix as having some of the lowest homicide rates among major U.S. cities.

Experts say the change, though not easily explained, is likely the result of more effective crime-fighting methods, stricter sentencing, demographic variables, sociological influences and the absence of a major drug epidemic.

Contact the author of this article or email tips@laist.com with further questions, comments or tips.

By Lisa Brenner in News on December 27, 2010 9:30 AM
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:52 PM   #5
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that is good news. regardless of whether they are completely correct...its trending downward.
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:56 PM   #6
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Well, they've imprisoned half the people in the state and their bloated prison system is bankrupting their government. I guess that's showing up in the numbers.
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Old 12-27-2010, 07:54 PM   #7
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People are not as violent when they are stoned on weed......... meth now that's a different tune
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Old 12-28-2010, 05:36 PM   #8
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Good to hear some good news.

Unfortunately, there is also bad news. Check out this new video from Michael Ruppert -- who think the shyte will hit the fan in January. He says the new Repuke led Congress will pass new legislation making it legal for cities and states to declare bankruptcy - -as a way to break unions and to stop paying salaries to state employees ---

If he's correct -- things could get messy in 2011.

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Old 12-28-2010, 11:03 PM   #9
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The unions in California have to go down Gaff. The sweetheart pension deals they all have just are like a ponzi scheme where the money has run out.
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:37 AM   #10
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Cut,

You watch too much FOX news. The problem has never been the unions. Since when are wages/salaries a ponzi scheme?

The investment banksters were the ones selling the sub primes, junk bonds and securities. They were the ones who got the bail outs -- not workers.

You should be supporting Ron Paul's efforts to audit the bad guys -- instead of issuing apologetics for the rip off of the American working man.

MHG
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:10 AM   #11
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That just cracks me up. Yeah, wages and pensions are the problem, not the ****ing piratocracy running both Washington and Wall Street. Just remember, when a Republican says "privatize" what he means is "Take more money from the suckers and pour it into the bank accounts of my pals." Man! There's a sucker born every minute.
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Old 12-29-2010, 01:02 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthemdown View Post
The unions in California have to go down Gaff. The sweetheart pension deals they all have just are like a ponzi scheme where the money has run out.
and like the unions up here id bet they got those by giving up wage increases, so if yer gonna take away the pensions better back pay them for however many years they have given up the buck or 2 an hour.

not so sure politicians should be the ones negotiating with the unions tho, i mean its not like it hurts the bottom line, they just tax more, maybe referendums on union contracts are in order
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Old 12-29-2010, 01:39 PM   #13
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When you work for a company that goes bankrupt you are out of luck. California is broke there is no money to pay them there sweetheart lifetime pensions. If they can do better in the private sector then quit and go get a job in the private sector. Fact is most state employees are lazy and getting more then they deserve. Time to pay the piper.
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Old 12-29-2010, 01:47 PM   #14
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One problem in Calif is that public employees are almost all college graduates. Many with Masters degrees. At first glance you think that is good, they should get paid well, they are smart. The problem is many of the positions simply do not require that level of education. So they want to make money equal to the private sector but they are fulfilling a job that could be done by a non college graduate.

I think states just hire too many college graduates because they can. They have taxpayer money to spend to they spend it. While a private company will say we need some entry level non college employees to train for certain positions that won't be paying that great.

Then these master degreed city workers just fall into there routine until they retire and get there great pension. All the while complaining people in the private sector make more with there masters degree.

Fact is that the more public jobs you have the worst it gets. We need less people living off the govt tit, not more. We need to cut the calif payroll, slash pensions, and get to chopping. If young state workers dont like it I suggest moving to the private sector.
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Old 12-29-2010, 04:32 PM   #15
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Opened up this thread hopin to read .........." Raider fans deported to Canada" ........Oh well maybe next year
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Old 12-30-2010, 02:24 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Rohirrim View Post
That just cracks me up. Yeah, wages and pensions are the problem, not the ****ing piratocracy running both Washington and Wall Street. Just remember, when a Republican says "privatize" what he means is "Take more money from the suckers and pour it into the bank accounts of my pals." Man! There's a sucker born every minute.
Here are two California examples. Yeah it is only the CEO's and Wall Street ripping off the tax payer. What a crock.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2...-xxxxx-xxxxxx/

Top UC executives demand pension boost

Five UC San Diego academic leaders are among three dozen of the University of California’s highest-paid executives to threaten a lawsuit unless they receive a boost in pension benefits they say was promised to them.

Their demand is outlined in a Dec. 9 letter to the UC Board of Regents obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle.

“We believe it is the university’s legal, moral and ethical obligation,” to increase the benefits for employees earning more than $245,000, the executives wrote. “Failure to do so will likely result in a costly and unsuccessful legal confrontation.”

The university system estimates that the pension hike would add $5.5 million yearly to its $21.6 billion unfunded pension liability. In addition to that, UC would be on the hook for a one-time $51 million cost to make the increases retroactive to 2007.

To date, pensions are calculated as a percentage of the average of the last three years of pay, capped at $245,000. For a 30-year employee, the maximum pension is therefore $183,750 — whether their final salary is $245,000 or much more.

If the cap is lifted, someone making $700,000 could make a pension of $525,000.
The executives who signed the letter say the regents agreed in 1999 to bump pensions once the Internal Revenue Service allowed them to lift the $245,000 cap. The IRS did just that in 2007 over the objections of some taxpayer groups.

UC San Diego academics who signed the letter, with their 2009 salary shown to illustrate the effect of the $245,000 cap on income that counts toward pensions:

• David Brenner, dean of the School of Medicine and vice chancellor for health science, $755,897.

• Tom Jackiewicz, CEO and associate vice chancellor of the health system, $600,000.

• Gary Matthews, vice chancellor, resource management and planning, $226,611.

• Thomas McAfee, dean for clinical affairs, $433,059.

• Robert Sullivan, dean of the Rady School of Management, $331,373.

Source: Sacramento Bee, San Diego Union-Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle


http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2...-crunch-looms/

6 retired educators in county are paid more than U.S. education secretary
With no clear way to fund retirement benefits, state system faces huge shortfall

San Diego’s pension problems have given the city a bad name nationally, but it’s becoming more apparent every week that similar benefit levels and funding shortfalls are plaguing governments small and large across the nation.

As part of an ongoing examination of these issues, The Watchdog has reviewed local educator pensions and found a familiar story — high benefits with no clear way to pay them.

The state teacher’s pension system faces a $40.5 billion shortfall over the next 34 years, in part because it owes payments for life to people such as Rudy Castruita, the retired superintendent of the San Diego County Office of Education.

Castruita receives the region’s top educator pension of $281,034 a year, or 107 percent of his final salary. That pay in retirement exceeds U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s 2009 base salary of $196,700. Castruita, a 1992 state superintendent of the year, did not return several calls.


Top educator pensions, San Diego County
1.Rudy Castruita, retired in 2006 as superintendent to the San Diego County Office of Education, receives $281,034 or 107 percent of his salary.

2.Kenneth Noonan, retired in 2007 as superintendent of the Oceanside Unified School District, receives $249,011 or 92 percent of his salary.

3.Larry Maw, retired in 2005 as superintendent of the San Marcos Unified School District, receives $229,326 or 98 percent of his salary.

4.Ralph Cowles, retired as superintendent of Vista Unified School District in 2006, receives $223,632 or 97 percent of his salary.

5.Sherrill Amador, retired in 2004 as president of Palomar Community College, receives $218,511 or 113 percent of her salary.

6.Warren Hogarth, retired in 2003 as superintendent of the La Mesa-Spring Valley School District, receives $216,348 or 105 percent of his salary.

7.Louis “Lean” King, retired in 2009 as superintendent of the Encinitas Union Elementary School District, receives $179,144 or 83 percent of his salary.

8.Thomas Anthony, retired in 2009 as superintendent of the Fallbrook Union High School District, receives $173,812 or 89 percent of his salary.
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Old 12-30-2010, 06:58 PM   #17
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The unions are now backing Jerry Browns proposal to put tax increases on the ballot. All repubs in state senate firmly against it. The public unions will push it though because they know all that money will go to there pensions. Not sure Brown can swing it. If he doesn't get it by a vote I think he has to do it through things like a gas tax.

Best case scenario would be calif avoids bankruptcy by the unions negotiating a decrease to there pensions and bennies after retirement.

Another smart move would be to raise the retirement age of public union employees and make them have to work longer.
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Old 12-31-2010, 04:14 AM   #18
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Opened up this thread hopin to read .........." Raider fans deported to Canada" ........Oh well maybe next year
see when i first opened the thread i was expecting to see " at least you arent greece or ireland"

an we dont want the raider fans, send em back to mexico where they came from.
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Old 12-31-2010, 07:17 AM   #19
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Here are two California examples. Yeah it is only the CEO's and Wall Street ripping off the tax payer. What a crock.
Compared to what Enron did to California (with Bush's blessings) this is chicken feed.

What's happening in Cal is no different than what is happening in America. The pirates bankrupt the nation with their criminal malfeasance and then want to go after pensions and social security to pay off the damages. Just as long as they keep the profit rolling in and the politicians paid off, they don't really care where the money comes from. The time to attack excessive pensions is when you write them, not after decades and the people have done their service under the contract and step up to collect their part of the bargain. How many CEOs and politicians would give a penny of their golden parachutes to make things right? You know the answer to that one. Their pensions and lifetime medical insurance are sacred. Everybody else's? Not so much.

The thieves on Wall Street just split amongst themselves $144 billion in bonuses and you're worried about these measly pensions? There's some Right Wing tunnel vision for ya.

Last edited by Rohirrim; 12-31-2010 at 07:27 AM..
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Old 12-31-2010, 02:32 PM   #20
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Chart: Four Decades of LA Crime Shows Recent Decline




Chart from
Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department


The Los Angeles Sheriffs Department has just released its latest research that shows the pattern of crime in Los Angeles County for the past four decades. The new chart shows several interesting milestones in LA's crime history including the jump in crime statistics after petty theft was added to the mix in the mid-70's and just how alarmingly high crime was when it peaked in 1980. The biggest takeaway from this new visual is the significant drops in crime that began in the 90's and the further dip in crime from 2007 to 2009.

KTLA notes that crime in the area decreased from 700 crimes per 10,000 in 1980-1981 down to under 300 crimes per 10,000 in 2009.

Contact the author of this article or email tips@laist.com with further questions, comments or tips.

By Callie Miller in News on December 31, 2010 10:00 AM
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Old 12-31-2010, 04:58 PM   #21
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It was crazy in so calif during the 80's. I grew up in lakewood, which is about 15 miles from Compton. There were drive by shootings pretty much every night back then. When the movie colors with Sean Penn came out it was at its peak. I can still remember my parents not letting my older sister go see that flick for fear there would be a drive by. I was too young back then so not an issue for me.

I'm not sure crime is really down though for ordinary people. Sure the gangbangers dont seem to drive by attack as much as they used to, but when it comes to robberies and other property crimes I'm not convinced.

Also many crimes now commited by, and against illegals immigrants who many times don't report said attack for fear of deportation.
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Old 01-04-2011, 11:36 AM   #22
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Compared to what Enron did to California (with Bush's blessings) this is chicken feed.

What's happening in Cal is no different than what is happening in America. The pirates bankrupt the nation with their criminal malfeasance and then want to go after pensions and social security to pay off the damages. Just as long as they keep the profit rolling in and the politicians paid off, they don't really care where the money comes from. The time to attack excessive pensions is when you write them, not after decades and the people have done their service under the contract and step up to collect their part of the bargain. How many CEOs and politicians would give a penny of their golden parachutes to make things right? You know the answer to that one. Their pensions and lifetime medical insurance are sacred. Everybody else's? Not so much.

The thieves on Wall Street just split amongst themselves $144 billion in bonuses and you're worried about these measly pensions? There's some Right Wing tunnel vision for ya.
Very few CEOs have lifetime pensions. Very few. Bonuses are paid out of the profits of the companies. Pensions simply add to the losses these public employees are creating.

And it is not chump change. Paying 30 to 40 years of quarter million to half million dollar pensions is big time money when you think for a given position 3 to 5 people can be drawing a pension off that position.

Wall Street is not losing money. The States are.

The Dems have been pimping up the pension plans for public employees for the last decade and a half and now it is coming home to roost and bankrupting the states. Nice work.

And your response? "Yeah but look at Wall Street." Silly and irresponsible just like the people who granted these ridiculous pensions in the first place.
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Old 01-04-2011, 02:40 PM   #23
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I wonder how much of that is attributed to the fact that places like Vallejo cannot afford their own police department?
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Old 01-04-2011, 03:10 PM   #24
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Wall Street is not losing money. The States are.
if banks can be too big to fail why cant states ?
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:51 PM   #25
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if banks can be too big to fail why cant states ?
Two wrongs make a total fail, is that it? With logic like that you Canucks will be able to just walk across the border and buy the whole ****box with that oil sands money. I see your clever plot.
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