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Old 03-13-2009, 07:54 AM   #1451
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http://realitysandwich.com/strange_bedfellows

Strange Bedfellows

Many of us may think that politics and the occult are an unlikely couple, but the truth is that the two have had a long and remarkably influential relationship involving some of the key turning points in western history. It is true that for some, the notion of an occult politics may not be entirely alien. Yet most accounts of the connection between these two seemingly radically different pursuits tend to focus on the dark side of occult politics, i.e., the links, real or imaginary, between occultism and far-right, fascist politics, specifically Hitler and the Nazis.

While it is true that some forms of far-right political philosophy have had some links to occultism, most of the stories about the dark forces and "black brotherhoods" who were behind the rise of National Socialism are merely that, stories, fun to read and highly exciting, but in reality based more on fantasy and conjecture than on any hard facts.

Yet having said this, what I found in researching my book is that, in the last few centuries, there have been real links between occult thought and more conservative forms of politics, but that this coupling isn’t the whole story. There has also been what we can call a "progressive" occult politics, although to be sure, its presence and influence have received less attention than the more sensational tales of mystical Nazis using magic powers to conquer the world.
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Old 03-13-2009, 07:58 AM   #1452
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http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-sto...5875-21172917/

Pancake winner dies in all-you-can-eat contest
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Old 03-13-2009, 08:01 AM   #1453
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http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/200...onverters.html

Hidden Cameras in DTV Converters? YouTube Hoax Fans Conspiracy Fears

Dtv_cam_hoax_2

Ever wonder what the government is really up to paying for all those digital TV converter boxes? Last week a Spokane, Washington man claimed he'd discovered the horrifying truth, and he produced a YouTube video to prove it.

In a 90-second video that's popping up on tin-foil-hat sites everywhere, 28-year-old software engineer Adam Chronister is seen cracking open his government-subsidized Magnavox converter, and revealing to the world the tiny video camera and microphone hidden inside.

"I had a friend who was trying to tell me that they put cameras in these things," Chronister narrates in a deadly-serious monotone. "So what I did was open it up to prove them wrong, and lo and behold ... this thing does in fact have both a camera and a microphone. " His finger points at a small lens attached to a transformer in the guts of the unit.

The video instantly went viral, tapping into a current of DTV conspiracy theory that's been building online since the government started issuing $40 converter box coupons last summer.

So far, the U.S. has spent $1.3 billion subsidizing the boxes that will keep TV lovers watching CSI when the last broadcasters shut off their analog transmissions in June. The huge government effort to put a -- mysterious, to many -- piece of technology in millions of American homes has spurred conspiracy theories ranging from a mind control experiments to mass telescreen surveillance.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:22 AM   #1454
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Default Eternal Sunshine of the spotless mind

http://www.thestar.com/sciencetech/article/601208

Erasing traumatic memory possible, researchers say

Joseph Hall
Health Reporter

A group of researchers at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children have erased brain cells in mice that store fearful memories, holding out the hope that terrifying memories in humans may one day be erased before causing conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

While the sights and sounds of a terrifying blast or crash would stay intact, the memory of the fear it caused could conceivably be erased, the researchers suggest. Their work appears today in the journal Science.

"You wouldn't want to completely get rid of all aspects of a memory," says Dr. Michael Salter, head of the Neurosciences & Mental Health program at the hospital.

"To help people with these kinds of post-traumatic stress disorders ..... you might just want to minimize the emotional association between the memory and the highly disruptive and negative emotions that people have in this context."

He says the research may well conjure "Orwellian" notions of mind manipulation and thought control.

"But that's not really the goal of this. The idea would be (to use it) in a therapeutic way," Salter says, referring in particular to post-traumatic stress prevention.



http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0311103611.htm

Spotless Mind? Fear Memories In Humans Weakened With Beta-blocker Propranolol

ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2009) — A team of Dutch researchers led by Merel Kindt has successfully reduced the fear response. They weakened fear memories in human volunteers by administering the beta-blocker propranolol. Interestingly, the fear response does not return over the course of time.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:26 AM   #1455
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0311085058.htm

Wag The Robot? Robot Responds To Human Gestures

ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2009) — Imagine a day when you turn to your own personal robot, give it a task and then sit down and relax, confident that your robot is doing exactly what you wanted it to do.


http://www.geekologie.com/2009/03/th...ldren_robo.php

They're After Our Children!: Robot Substitute




Have kids? Well you won't for long if Saya, the robot substitute, has her way. The harbinger of death is allegedly multilingual, capable of calling roll, reading, and assigning work from textbooks. Also, scaring the **** out of your children.

Behind her latex face -- modeled on a university student -- 18 motors create expressions including happiness, surprise, fear, disgust, sadness and even anger.


Saya will start teaching after passing a trial term at a Tokyo primary.

Her creator, science professor Hiroshi Kobayashi, had been working on the robot for 15 years.

Wow, robotic substitutes -- what will they think of next? Robotic cafeteria ladies? That would suck, because I'm a boy that needs extra fish sticks, and you can't bribe a robot. Or can you? Hey Roomba, I'll oil you if you clean under the bed really well. *BEEP BOP BEEP* DOES NOT COMPUTE. You piece of ****, I knew I never should have WOOTed you.

Hit the jump to see what your robotic substitute looks like with no face.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:31 AM   #1456
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http://www.philipcoppens.com/turim_mummies.html

White Masters in the deserts of China?

The discovery of Caucasoid mummies in China shows that East and West might have been meeting since the Bronze Age. Do they validate some of the ancient legends?
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:32 AM   #1457
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http://www.histories-mysteries.com/2...ost-city-of-z/

Synopsis

A grand mystery reaching back centuries. A sensational disappearance that made headlines around the world. A quest for truth that leads to death, madness or disappearance for those who seek to solve it. The Lost City of Z is a blockbuster adventure narrative about what lies beneath the impenetrable jungle canopy of the Amazon.
After stumbling upon a hidden trove of diaries, acclaimed New Yorker writer David Grann set out to solve “the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century”: What happened to the British explorer Percy Fawcett and his quest for the Lost City of Z?
In 1925, Fawcett ventured into the Amazon to find an ancient civilization, hoping to make one of the most important discoveries in history. For centuries Europeans believed the world’s largest jungle concealed the glittering kingdom of El Dorado. Thousands had died looking for it, leaving many scientists convinced that the Amazon was truly inimical to humankind. But Fawcett, whose daring expeditions helped inspire Conan Doyle’s “The Lost World”, had spent years building his scientific case. Captivating the imagination of millions around the globe, Fawcett embarked with his twenty-one-year-old son, determined to prove that this ancient civilization existed. Then he and his expedition vanished.

Fawcett’s fate – and the tantalizing clues he left behind about “Z” – became an obsession for hundreds who followed him into the uncharted wilderness. For decades scientists and adventurers have searched for evidence of Fawcett’s party and the lost City of Z. Countless have perished, been captured by tribes, or gone mad.
As David Grann delved ever deeper into the mystery surrounding Fawcett’s quest, and the greater mystery of what lies within the Amazon, he found himself, like the generations who preceded him, drawn into the jungle’s “green hell.” His quest for the truth, and his stunning discoveries about Fawcett’s fate and “Z,” form the heart of this enthralling narrative.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:37 AM   #1458
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http://australianetworknews.com/stor...03/2508800.htm

Ancient pre-Angkor kingdom unearthed in Malaysia

Malaysian archaeologists say they have found the site of an an ancient kingdom in northern Kedah state, which predates Cambodia's Angkor temples and may be one of the oldest civilisations in Asia.

Lead researcher Professor Mokhtar Saidin says the discovery could lead to the rewriting of history books on the region.

He says buildings found in two palm oil plantations in northern Kedah last month appear to have been part of the ancient Hindu kingdom of Bujang, which existed in the area around 300AD, long before Cambodia's Angkor civilisation which flourished from the 12th to 14th centuries.

"We have dated artifacts from what we believe are an administration building and an iron smelter to 1,700 (years before present), which sets the Bujang civilisation between the third and fourth century AD," he told reporters.

Professor Mokhtar says the iron smelter was a particularly surprising find, as it shows a high level of technology for such an early civilisation.

"We have 30 more mounds at the site that have to be excavated and we are hoping to also find the port area for the kingdom as it was near the sea," he added.

"This will give us a clue to how the civilisation was trading and influenced by China and India, who would have been the two main powers back then to have influenced development in this region."

http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=596

This is an image of the area around the city of Angkor, Cambodia. The city houses an ancient complex of more than 60 temples dating back to the 9th century. The principal complex, Angkor Wat, is the bright square just left of the center of the image. It is surrounded by a reservoir that appears in this image as a thick black line. The larger bright square above Angkor Wat is another temple complex called Angkor Thom. Archeologists studying this image believe the blue- purple area slightly north of Angkor Thom may be previously undiscovered structures. In the lower right is a bright rectangle surrounded by a dark reservoir, which houses the temple complex Chau Srei Vibol. In its heyday, Angkor had a population of 1 million residents and was the spiritual center for the Khmer people until it was abandoned in the 15th century. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on the 15th orbit of the space shuttle Endeavour on September 30, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 55 kilometers by 85 kilometers (34 miles by 53 miles) that is centered at 13.43 degrees north latitude and 103.9 degrees east longitude. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The body of water in the south-southwest corner is Tonle Sap, Cambodia's great central lake. The urban area at the lower left of the image is the present-day town of Siem Reap. The adjoining lines are both modern and ancient roads and the remains of Angkor's vast canal system that was used for both irrigation and transportation. The large black rectangles are ancient reservoirs. Today the Angkor complex is hidden beneath a dense rainforest canopy, making it difficult for researchers on the ground to study the ancient city. The SIR-C/X-SAR data are being used by archaeologists at the World Monuments Fund and the Royal Angkor Foundation to understand how the city grew, flourished and later fell into disuse over an 800-year period. The data are also being used to help reconstruct the vast system of hydrological works, canals and reservoirs, which have gone out of use over time. Research teams from more than 11 countries will be using this data to study the Angkor complex.

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Old 03-16-2009, 07:37 AM   #1459
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http://www.allnewsweb.com/page4994992.php

Cambodia: Dinosaur images noticed in temple ruin




Conventional science has it that the dinosaurs were wiped out many millions of years ago either as the result of climate change or a meteorite hitting earth. Some researchers, however, claim that dinosaurs might have continued to roam remote parts of the earth as recently as a few hundred years ago. A few even claim that there might be some small populations of dinosaurs, otherwise believed to be extinct, surviving in the world’s most isolated forests.
A reader has sent to All News Web these photos of the stunning Ta Prohm Temple (pictured below) deep in the jungles of Cambodia.This temple is the work of the remarkable Khmer civilization which lasted from the 800’s AD until the 1400’s AD.
The temple is covered with the most intricate of carvings. The reader who was visiting the area noticed very distinct and clear images that seem to depict a Stegosaurus (pictured above), indicating that this creature might well have survived up until the Khmer era in the region. One expert on Khmer ruins has told us that it is unlikely that these images are a recent addition to the temple.



http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo...mbodian-stego/

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Old 03-16-2009, 07:41 AM   #1460
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http://spectrum.ieee.org/mar09/7895

http://spectrum.ieee.org/mar09/7895/handsb1


Fusion on a Budget


1. Choose your fusor design: Hirsch-Farnsworth [see “Tabletop Fusion”], Elmore-Tuck-Watson, or some variant of your own creation.

2. Assemble your fusor with a fanatical attention to cleanliness. You will need a vacuum-tight shell, a high-voltage grill, various feedthroughs, a valve to admit deuterium, a vacuum pump, and power supplies.

3. Pump the fusor down to a millionth of an atmosphere or so, fire it up to 10 or 15 kilovolts (or whatever levels your design requires), and see what kinds of discharge it makes without deuterium in it. There are images on fusor sites to suggest what you ought to be seeing; if you aren’t, debug until you are.

4. Acquire some deuterium (either as a gas or as heavy water that you can split by electrolysis), some sensors for detecting neutrons or charged particles, and some shielding.

5. Turn on your fusor, admit trace quantities of deuterium from a safe distance, and collect your data.


Do you have a few thousand dollars to spare, some basic machining and welding skills, and the ability to follow directions without getting fingerprints inside your equipment? Then you, too, can build a baby fusion reactor, or fusor, in your garage.

In fact, it’s pretty simple, according to Paul Schatzkin, who runs Fusor.net, a Web site where amateur “fusioneers” congregate to swap equipment and advice: “Find two stainless steel half-spheres, seal them together around a wire grid, suck the air out of it, apply some high voltage to the grid, inject a bit of deuterium into the chamber, and sit back and count the neutrons.” Don’t expect to reach energy breakeven, Schatzkin says, but at least you’ll be failing to achieve practical fusion at only a millionth the cost of a tokamak.

Tokamaks, the multibillion-dollar fusion reactors that have occupied physicists’ attention for more than 50 years in their quest for limitless clean energy, use a magnetic field to confine a plasma heated to about 100 million kelvins and compressed so that the deuterium nuclei inside will collide and fuse. A fusor is even simpler: Just make a very deep electrostatic potential well for your nuclei to fall into, and make it radially symmetrical so that they wallop into each other when they reach the middle [see “Fusioneering” and “Tabletop Fusion”]. Nuclei at a temperature of 100 million kelvins have the same energy as those that have traversed a potential drop of only about 9000 volts, so getting your nuclei to travel fast enough will not be a problem.
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Old 03-16-2009, 12:37 PM   #1461
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http://planetark.org/wen/51981

# Sea levels rising faster than expected. You've got two choices: learn to swim, or learn carpentry.



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Old 03-16-2009, 01:09 PM   #1462
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http://www.theage.com.au/news/entert...447129641.html

"Think of the global credit crises," he says. "Well, in 10 to 15 years we could see something similar happen with food, a sort of global food crunch. This would have far worse consequences than this financial crises ... In just a few generations we have burned almost all our reserves of fossil fuel and pumped the gas into the atmosphere."

Holden refers to the fact that almost all the food in the Western world is grown using oil. Tractors and harvesters run on diesel, chemical pesticides are made from oil; fertilisers are either made directly from oil or mined from rapidly diminishing mineral reserves.

He also describes a global food production and distribution system that uses oil to transport food not only around the world but within national borders.

"We rely so much on oil for our food that if something were to disrupt that supply, such as a political incident like we saw recently when Russia cut off gas supplies to Europe this winter, terrorism or war, then our food stocks would run out.

"We must also consider that we have reached peak oil production and it's just going to get more expensive from now on."
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Old 03-16-2009, 01:14 PM   #1463
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http://www.slate.com/id/2213353?nav=wp

Elf Detection 101How to find the hidden folk of Iceland.
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:07 AM   #1464
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http://copycateffect.blogspot.com/20...green-men.html

http://copycateffect.blogspot.com/20...green-men.html

Tuesday, March 17, 2009
Green Men





Green Men are often represented as garden waterspouts, doorknockers and associated landscape ornaments.

Happy St. Patrick's Day!



March 17th seems like a good day to talk about Green Men, Jolly Green Giants, and Wild Men traditions.

Let’s look for a moment at the tradition underlying the Green Giant, as it was originally known.

In 1903, Green Giant® was founded in Le Sueur, Minnesota, as the Minnesota Valley Canning Company. In 1925, a boy-like, pale, giant human figure with a leafy bit of clothing was introduced to market the company’s new line of giant sweet, early green peas. The name “Green Giant” for this marketing image soon followed, with the giant figure’s skin then turning green.

Eventually the Green Giant came to symbolize not only the peas, but the company as well. In 1950, Minnesota Valley Canning Company disappeared completely behind the trademark it had created and became officially, the Green Giant Company. Today, the “Jolly Green Giant”® is the name of the giant figure, having evolved from the youthful figure of 1925.



Statue of Jolly Green Giant, Blue Earth, Minnesota.

In our search for the origins of the California Giant in the tales of the California Bigfoot, should we be disturbed that Jolly Green Giants are not running around Minnesota? Perhaps. Perhaps not. First and foremost, the tradition of the Green Giant appears to have a direct link, in terms of artistic imagery, with the folklore and widespread art of the European Green Man.

From ancient times, the archetypal figure shown as the “Green Giant” is commonly referred to as “The Green Man,” or leafy man, and has been discussed throughout European texts, especially in England, and as well as, in France, where it is called Le Feuillou, and in Germany, where it is known as Blattqesicht. Authors have written extensively on the pagan and Celtic traditions of these Green Men, and books and websites about them are abundant.

Scholars, furthermore, see a direct link between the European traditions of the Green Man, and the old tales and encounters with real Wild Men. "The wildman (who may be the same as the 'green man'),” Myra Shackley notes in her book, Wildmen: Yeti, Sasquatch and the Neanderthal Enigma, “also takes on the role of the spirit of the woods, a kind of pagan nature god...Over 200 European families have wildmen as heraldic emblems, and many more as supporters. Any nude figure in heraldry is called a 'savage', 'wildman' or 'woodman', and the terms are interchangeable. There is little variation in the way they are portrayed, leafy decorations and a club being the rule....Wildmen (or green men) also appear carved in wood and as architectural adornments in the Middle Ages...Green men are frequently shown as a face with foliage emerging from the mouth, and fifty or more of these are known from England alone. The green man is also found carved in stone, as a gargoyle…In the Elizabethan period wildmen, or green men, were often employed to clear the way for processions, wielding sticks."

Clearly the Green Man comes from the tradition and evolution of the art form of the burly wildmen, the woodsmen, and thus the man of the woods and greenery. Shackley notes: "Wildmen are important figures in medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts. They may be called 'wodewoses' or 'woodhouses', and are frequently shown covered with long hair or fur. An additional class of picture shows actors in plays, masques and dramas who are depicted in wildman costumes...The name 'wodewose' is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Wudewasa and thence from Wudu (late Old English for wood); Wudewasa seems to mean 'man-of-the-wood'.…"

The “wildmen” are an active topic in hominology, and some researchers feel the Wildmen and Green Men are a remembrance of Neandertal. As Shackley, Ivan T. Sanderson, and others have noted, we must view the interrelationship between the hairy wildfolk lurking in the remote woodlands of the Middle Ages and the European wildmen, regardless of whether they were called wodewose or green men.

So the graphic transmutation of the survival of late Neandertals in Europe to Wild Men and Green Men, with an artistic connection to the Green Giant and Jolly Green Giant, is worth serious consideration. There appears to be a link between that label on a can of peas in your kitchen and the possible existence of relict hairy hominids, even if uncomfortably so.

Just as the encounters of European wildmen survive in medieval carvings and other graphic representations, so too is the evidence of early-twentieth-century California Bigfoot evident in an artistic form. Depression-era painters appear to have captured the giant hairy hominid on at least one fruit crate label. The containers for lettuce, carrots, and, yes, green peas may have much to teach us in Bigfoot studies, beyond our wildest imaginations.

by Loren Coleman, from Bigfoot! The True Story of Apes in America (NY: Paraview Pocket - Simon and Schuster, 2003, pages 56-58)




European Wild Man art.

Photo credit for all images above: Wikipedia.
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Old 03-18-2009, 07:59 PM   #1465
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Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
http://www.allnewsweb.com/page4994992.php

Cambodia: Dinosaur images noticed in temple ruin




Conventional science has it that the dinosaurs were wiped out many millions of years ago either as the result of climate change or a meteorite hitting earth. Some researchers, however, claim that dinosaurs might have continued to roam remote parts of the earth as recently as a few hundred years ago. A few even claim that there might be some small populations of dinosaurs, otherwise believed to be extinct, surviving in the world’s most isolated forests.
A reader has sent to All News Web these photos of the stunning Ta Prohm Temple (pictured below) deep in the jungles of Cambodia.This temple is the work of the remarkable Khmer civilization which lasted from the 800’s AD until the 1400’s AD.
The temple is covered with the most intricate of carvings. The reader who was visiting the area noticed very distinct and clear images that seem to depict a Stegosaurus (pictured above), indicating that this creature might well have survived up until the Khmer era in the region. One expert on Khmer ruins has told us that it is unlikely that these images are a recent addition to the temple.



http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo...mbodian-stego/

I've never seen any dinosaur that looked like that though.
It sort of looks like a cross between a stegosaurus and
a hornless triceratops. Something that someone that
has just seen pictures of dinosaurs would carve from
memory. And as to dinosaurs living in remote jungles,
the question that needs to be asked is if these jungles
existed 65 million years ago. For example, some claim
the Loch Ness monster is a dinosaur that managed
to survive until present times. Problem with that is
the Loch Ness is only 10,000 years old. So where
was this dinosaur living the previous 64,990,000 years?
And other that this one expert's claim, what other
proof is there that this isn't a recent carving?
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Old 03-18-2009, 08:04 PM   #1466
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Stegosaurus
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Old 03-18-2009, 08:05 PM   #1467
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Protoceratops
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Old 03-19-2009, 05:45 AM   #1468
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Originally Posted by Bronco Bob View Post
I've never seen any dinosaur that looked like that though.
It sort of looks like a cross between a stegosaurus and
a hornless triceratops. Something that someone that
has just seen pictures of dinosaurs would carve from
memory. And as to dinosaurs living in remote jungles,
the question that needs to be asked is if these jungles
existed 65 million years ago. For example, some claim
the Loch Ness monster is a dinosaur that managed
to survive until present times. Problem with that is
the Loch Ness is only 10,000 years old. So where
was this dinosaur living the previous 64,990,000 years?
And other that this one expert's claim, what other
proof is there that this isn't a recent carving?

I guess any archeological proof of dating (weather erosion, etc etc) would give a ball park it of "recent".
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Old 03-19-2009, 05:53 AM   #1469
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Over time living in the jungles would have likely shrunk the size of the species as well. It seems entirely plausible that some did exist into the age of man.
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Old 03-19-2009, 06:49 AM   #1470
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...d-gps-tracker/

‘Nano Sized’ GPS Tracking Device - The Next Best Thing To An Implanted GPS Tracker
March 19, 2009 · No Comments

Soccer moms want GPS Implant. Lighting GPS launches Tiny covert Military Grade GPS Tracker any Mom can use.
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Old 03-19-2009, 06:51 AM   #1471
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http://deadlinescotland.wordpress.co...irst-time-739/



FREEMASONS at the Edinburgh Masonic Club have made a historic decision to allow women members, rolling back half a century of tradition.

The club’s 1,100 masons voted the motion through last month - a decision ten years in the making.

The first women members will go through the club’s doors on April 1st, and the club are anticipating a huge surge in membership.
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Old 03-19-2009, 06:53 AM   #1472
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...or-blackwater/

The Obama Administration’s New Deal for Blackwater
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Old 03-19-2009, 07:55 AM   #1473
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...maiden-voyage/



Terrafugia’s flying car makes maiden voyage

The start-up Terrafugia first popped up on our radar screens in early 2006 with a one-fifth scale model, $30,000 in prize money, and an urge to build a car that could fly. Or is that an airplane you can take on the highway?

Some signs point strongly to the latter. Terrafugia describes its Transition vehicle as a “roadable aircraft” and is pitching it in part as giving private pilots an easy travel alternative when bad weather makes flying a bad idea, or simply to avoid having to take a separate car to the airport. Also, in the eyes of the Federal Aviation Administration, the vehicle falls into the light sport aircraft category.

On March 5, Terrafugia got to show that–whatever the eventual business prospects–the Transition can indeed fly. The maiden voyage (the duration wasn’t specified) took place at the Plattsburgh International Airport in New York, with a retired U.S. Air Force Reserve colonel in the pilot’s seat. The flight followed six months of static, road, and taxi testing.

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Old 03-19-2009, 10:16 AM   #1474
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http://cryptogon.com/?p=7595

Obama Administration: Constitution Does Not Protect Cell-Site Records
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Old 03-19-2009, 10:19 AM   #1475
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http://www.wikileaks.org/wiki/Murder...s_assassinated

Murder in Nairobi: Wikileaks related human rights lawyers assassinated
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