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Old 12-23-2008, 07:04 AM   #1301
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http://theparanormalpastor.blogspot....l-pillars.html

Saturday, December 20, 2008
Soul Pillars

Another common phenomenon that I have found while researching the passing of terminally ill patients is that of ‘Soul Pillars’.


This is a phenomenon that is not readily perceived by the average person. And many who witness it almost never tell anyone else lest their sanity is called into question. But as I have investigated this phenomenon and sharing with my interviewees some of my personal paranormal experiences reports of this phenomenon arises over and over again.


It seems that when ‘sensitive’ individuals are around the time of death of certain patients they notice a light coming from the person’s body just as they pass away. Just as these same sensatives might have personal paranormal encounters such as visibly being able to see ghosts or other supernatural activity, they also are able to see this strange occurrence.


Many who have witnessed it have the opinion that they are witness to the patients soul passing from the body to the other side. Usually it lasts only for a few moments, from a split second to less than a minute. Other times Holy objects in the room where the deceased passes also have an influence over the ‘Soul Pillar’ and might even have a beam of energy to emit itself.


The color of the ‘Soul Pillar’ varies. Some people see a white pillar all the time, others see a pink or purple one. Some see pillars of various colors emitted from the dying ones body.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:05 AM   #1302
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http://www.physorg.com/news148887530.html

Inventor's 'refrigeration system' for planet shows promise, but scientists are skeptical
December 19th, 2008 By Greg Gordon in Space & Earth science / Earth Sciences

Ron Ace says that his breakthrough moments have come at unexpected times - while he lay in bed, eased his aging Cadillac across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge or steered a tractor around his rustic, five-acre property.


In the seclusion of his Maryland home, Ace has spent three years glued to the Internet, studying the Earth's climate cycles and careening from one epiphany to another - a 69-year-old loner with the moxie to try to solve one of the greatest threats to mankind.

Now, backed by a computer model, the little-known inventor is making public a U.S. patent petition for what he calls the most "practical, nontoxic, affordable, rapidly achievable" and beneficial way to curb global warming and a resulting catastrophic ocean rise.

Spray gigatons of seawater into the air, mainly in the Northern Hemisphere, and let Mother Nature do the rest, he says.

The evaporating water, Ace said, would cool the Earth in multiple ways: First, the sprayed droplets would transform to water vapor, a change that absorbs thermal energy near ground level; then the rising vapor would condense into sunlight-reflecting clouds and cooling rain, releasing much of the stored energy into space in the form of infrared radiation.

McClatchy Newspapers has followed Ace's work for three years and obtained a copy of his 2007 patent petition for what he calls "a colossal refrigeration system with a 100,000-fold performance multiplier."

"The Earth has a giant air-conditioning problem," he said. "I'm proposing to put a thermostat on the planet."

Although it might sound preposterous, a computer model run by an internationally known global warming scientist suggests that Ace's giant humidifier might just work.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:06 AM   #1303
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http://network.nationalpost.com/np/b...ek-circle.aspx

Man stumbles on round, spinning ‘creek circle’

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Old 12-23-2008, 07:06 AM   #1304
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http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/1...ght/index.html

# Story Highlights
# Each week CNN.com showcases some of our favorite new space-related photos
# Bode's Galaxy is one of the brightest galaxies that can be seen from Earth
# Cassiopeia A is what's left of a massive star that died in a supernova explosion
# Messier 104, better known as the Sombrero Galaxy, looks like a cosmic halo
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:08 AM   #1305
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http://vincent.callebaut.org/planche-lilypad_pl29.html


Interesting architecture


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Old 12-23-2008, 07:09 AM   #1306
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...s-experts.html




Purple squirrel baffles experts
A purple squirrel which appeared at a school has baffled experts who are unable to explain its colour.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:22 AM   #1307
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http://thehiddenagendas.blogspot.com...aky-scion.html

Thursday, December 18, 2008
Wild Theory Wed: Da 'Vinci The Sneaky Scion
At the request of a great friend who saw my fractal posts, here, here, and here I took a look at some of Da'Vinci's artworks from the "fractal viewpoint".

It's fairly known that Leonardo da Vinci was a Priory of Scion member and a brilliant artist, thinker, and inventor, not to mention schooled in the esoteric. He hid many symbols in his works pertaining to his own belief systems.



The Last Supper by Leonardo Da Vinci

Above is the famous painting 'The Last Supper'. Now I've seen other syncronauts mention the "3 illuminated windows" behind Jesus and how he forms the Pyramid, yada yada yada, o.k. well, I decided to try and "think" like an esoterically trained artist would. My thoughts were "well, more than likely an esoteric secret society doesn't believe in Jesus, they just perpetrate the myth to keep their control". You know, power of myth belief? I decide to "ignore" the entire buffet scene and focus on the "not so apparent". Since Da Vinci was a very intelligent creator, and did some "self portraits", I theorized it must have been with mirrors...and the Hermetic belief of "as above, so below" came to mind. I decided ultimately to cut the entire cast of characters out and focus on the "above". I cut the above out and ran it through a "mirror mirror" filter which did the "as above so below" thang:



Here is a straight dead on view of the results..but turn it 90 degrees and...



Holy Kamole' Batman! Is that a Pyramid with a capstone hovering there?
Whats that above? The duality gates of Heaven/Hell? Looks like its heading
straight into the Void no less!

If you look more closely at the pyramid, you'll see some interesting patterns. So I have to ask, is this a "hidden symbol" for those that are aware? Did DaVinci hide this in there on purpose, or did some [K]osmic [K]onsciousness embed it in there? My money is on it was hidden there and mirrors were used in its inception onto canvas...if not, then the Luciferian mindset has some explaining to do! Either way, it makes for an interesting water cooler conversation.

That's all I have time for now folks, be wise, be well, and have peace!
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:33 AM   #1308
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IMO, this guy is the anti-pope:

http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...-the-solstice/



Pope Benedict XVI, wearing his Saturn Hat, named after the ringed planet Saturn, smiles as he tours St. Peter’s square aboard his popemobile during the weekly open-air general audience at the Vatican Wednesday, June 25, 2008. AP Photo by PLINIO LEPRI

The Pope tipped his hat to long-time Vatican bugbear Galileo this weekend as he helped kick off the 2009 International Year of Astronomy.

Pope Benedict also gave some comfort to pagans by acknowledging the connection between the date of Christmas and the Winter Solstice.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:36 AM   #1309
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...can-nightmare/

Sex slavery: Living the American nightmare
December 23, 2008 · No Comments

Shadowy multibillion-dollar industry far more widespread than expected

MSNBC | Dec 22, 2008

By Alex Johnson and Cesar Rodriguez

When FBI and immigration agents arrested a 28-year-old Guatemalan woman three months ago in Los Angeles, they announced that they had shut down one of the most elaborate sex trafficking rings in the country. It was also the family business.

The woman, Maribel Rodriguez Vasquez, was the sixth member of her family to be rounded up in the two-year multi-agency investigation. Vasquez, five of her relatives and three other Guatemalan nationals were charged with 50 counts, alleging that they lured at least a dozen young women — including five minors as young as 13 years old — to the United States with promises of good jobs, only to put them to work as prostitutes. All remain in custody as investigators attempt to unravel the complex case.

Vasquez — quickly dubbed the “L.A. Madam” — attracted attention because she had been featured on the fugitive-hunting television program “America’s Most Wanted.” But it was one of only a few such cases to be spotlighted by national media, contributing to the false impression that cases of immigrant sex trafficking are isolated incidents, law enforcement officials and advocates for immigrants say.

The reality is that human trafficking goes on in nearly every American city and town, said Lisette Arsuaga, director of development for the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking, a human rights organization in Los Angeles.

“Human trafficking is well hidden,” Arsuaga said. “I consider it a huge problem.”

Her assessment is shared by authorities in Bexar County, Texas, where the Sheriff’s Office has formed a task force with Shared Hope International, an anti-slavery organization founded by former Rep. Linda Smith, D-Wash. Bexar County is considered a crossroads of the cross-border Mexican sex slave trade because two Interstate highways that crisscross the state intersect there, some 150 miles from the Mexican border.

“I could go to a truck stop in South Texas right now and get on a CB radio and ask for some sweet stuff, and someone’s going to come out and offer something to sell,” Sheriff’s Deputy Chris Burchell said.

A $9.5 billion-a-year industry

Federal officials agree that the trafficking of human beings as sex slaves is far more prevalent than is popularly understood. While saying it is difficult to pinpoint the scope of the industry, given its shadowy nature, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials estimated that it likely generates more than $9.5 billion a year.

Last year alone, the FBI opened more than 225 human trafficking investigations in the United States. Figures for 2008 are not yet available, but in a coordinated nationwide sweep in July, federal, state and local authorities made more than 640 arrests and rescued 47 children in just three days.

In congressional testimony this year, FBI Director Robert Mueller called sex trafficking “a significant and persistent problem in the U.S. and around the world.”

Most cases involve “international persons trafficked to the United States from other countries,” who are generally less aware of their rights, probably do not speak English and are frightened to go to the authorities, he said. “Victims are often lured with false promises of good jobs and better lives and are then forced to work in the sex industry.”

While an increasing number of young men and boys are being forced into the commercial sex industry, more than 80 percent of victims are women and girls, the State Department estimated this year. Of those, 70 percent are forced into prostitution, stripping, pornography or mail-order marriage.

That allegedly was the case with the L.A. Madam.

Prosecutors said in court documents that the Vasquez ring sold Guatemalan women and girls to one another like slaves for several years. Ring members also would try to keep them in line by taking them to witch doctors who threatened to put curses on them and their families if they ran away, the prosecution said.

In one incident, three of the defendants repeatedly kicked and hit one of the victims to punish her for trying to escape, the documents allege.

“These young women were enticed into coming to this country by promises of the American dream, only to arrive and discover that what awaited was a nightmare,” said Robert Schoch, an ICE special agent.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:37 AM   #1310
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...sama-is-alive/



US Vice President Dick Cheney defended controversial interrogation methods in the US “war on terror”, while acknowledging he was not sure if al-Qa’ida chief Osama bin Laden was still alive.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:38 AM   #1311
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http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2...aims-new-book/

General George S. Patton was assassinated to silence his criticism of allied war leaders claims new book
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Old 12-23-2008, 08:00 AM   #1312
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http://strategicsorcery.blogspot.com...t-on-film.html

Old one caught on film.
Scientists call this a Siphonophone, but clearly this is one of the great old ones. Cant tell if its a partial capture of Chthulhu or perhaps a spawn of Azagthoth.



While on the subject of the great old ones it is time that I post some traditional Lovecraftian Carols for or your listening pleasure. Perhaps you might listen to them while hanging your traditional Cthulhu Wreath over the hearth...




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Old 12-23-2008, 11:33 AM   #1313
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Flawed nanotubes could be perfect silicon replacement

The paradox of perfection – that flaws make things perfect – could be the key to designing nanoelectronic circuits from carbon nanotubes, according to US scientists.

They have discovered that a circuit of nanotubes can only guide a current if some of the tubes carry structural defects.

Individual carbon nanotubes are exceptionally good conductors because they are essentially a single carbon molecule. They can even outdo silicon at transmitting charge, which means nanotube circuits could boost computing speeds while reducing chip size (see our feature What happens when silicon can shrink no more? ).

But connecting nanotubes into such circuits is not easy, says Vincent Meunier at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. "The connections between individual nanotubes do not conduct well," he says.

Instead of jumping easily into an adjacent nanotube, as they would between metal wires, electrons are more likely to bounce back when they reach the end of a tube, says Meunier. Electrons treat junctions between nanotubes as barriers – what scientists call "opaque".
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:34 AM   #1314
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Mitochondrial battery could sniff out explosives

A BIOELECTRONIC sensor the size of a postage stamp could sniff out bombs and other explosives.

Most commercially available explosives detectors tend to be expensive, bulky and complex - and hence difficult to use in the field. That may change thanks to a new sensor invented by Shelley Minteer and her colleagues at St Louis University in Missouri.

The detector is a spin-off from the Minteer group's work to develop fuel cells powered by mitochondria, the parts of cells that generate energy by burning a chemical called pyruvate. Produced by the digestion of sugars, pyruvate is the compound that starts the Krebs cycle - the complex series of chemical reactions in cells that releases energy as part of respiration.

The team had been working on a fuel cell that uses mitochondria bathed in pyruvate to generate an electric current, and devised a biological "off" switch in the form of a naturally occurring antibiotic called oligomycin, which hampers the oxidation of pyruvate. Adding oligomycin to the cell switches off the current.

Minteer and her colleagues found that if they then added trace amounts of nitrobenzene - a member of the same chemical family as many explosives - they could reverse the effect of oligomycin and switch the mitochondria back on. She says any chemically related explosive should do the same, and that the sensor is able to detect explosives in concentrations as low as 2 parts per trillion (Journal of the American Chemical Society, DOI: 10.1021/ja807250b).

"We should be able to detect all nitroaromatic explosives," says Minteer. "We are studying the other nitroaromatic explosives to determine what we can detect."

Timothy Swager, head of chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says the new device is "an elegant demonstration of a bioelectronic sensor".
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:40 AM   #1315
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Gas memory could send spooky messages the full distance

Quantum entanglement, which Einstein dubbed "spooky action at a distance", would be the perfect way to communicate data – if technical hurdles could be overcome.

The method involves linking the quantum properties of two objects such that a change to one is instantly reflected in the other – offering a whole new way to transmit information from opposite sides of the globe.

Entanglement has already been exploited as a way to securely share pass phrases for secret communications, but only over distances of less than 200 kilometres. The inability of the gas-based quantum computer memory used to hold onto information for more than a fraction of a second is to blame.

Now a way to have that memory store quantum information for longer opens up the possibility of entangled communication over 1000 kilometres.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:41 AM   #1316
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Invention: Slimline radioactive battery

Engineers have long hoped to exploit radioactive decay to generate electricity. One way to do this is to use a radioactive isotope, such as a variant of hydrogen called tritium, that emits electrons as it decays. Current is generated when the electrons hit semiconductive material nearby.

Attempts to put the theory into practice have been plagued by extremely low efficiency, though, converting only a small fraction of the emitted electrons into current.

The problem is that the electrons cannot travel far from their starting place in the tritium nucleus. Most end up lodging in the radioactive material itself and never reach the adjacent semiconductor.

Now Paul Engel and colleagues at Rice University in Houston, Texas, say that these batteries can be made more efficient by using a thin layer of a liquid polymer that contains the isotope.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:42 AM   #1317
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Fat fingers no problem with 'see-through' touchscreen




Electronic devices have been shrinking for years, but you might be forgiven for thinking that one that's only a centimetre across would be just too difficult to operate.

Now tests of a prototype device only slightly larger than this have shown that it can be made perfectly usable by combining a screen on the front with a touch-sensitive pad on the back.

Touch screens can be an intuitive method of interacting with computers and are now near ubiquitous in smartphones and other high-end hand-held gadgets.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:43 AM   #1318
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Transparent memory makes for see-through phones

TRANSPARENT cellphones, iPods and memory sticks are among the oddball possibilities being predicted for the world's first transparent flash memory chip.

Transparent transistors have been made before, but they have not been assembled into working see-through chips. The new memory chip, made by engineers at Korea's Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon, records data by changing the resistance of a metal oxide film, a technology known as resistive RAM or RRAM.

KAIST's trick is to use a clear zinc oxide film as the recording layer and to connect it up with transparent indium tin oxide electrodes (Applied Physics Letters, DOI: 10.1063/1.3041643). The chip itself looks like a microscope slide. Expect commercial applications in three to four years.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:43 AM   #1319
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Invention: Vision amplifier

* 13:20 22 December 2008 by Justin Mullins
* For similar stories, visit the Invention and Mental Health Topic Guides

The number of people suffering seriously impaired vision due to damaged retinas is increasing in the developed world, as populations age and diabetes becomes more common. The search for a technological solution to the problem has led to growing interest in "bionic eyes".

Devices developed so far have usually involved installing a silicon chip into the eye to electrically stimulate the retina's nerves in response to light. Some impressive results have been achieved in this way, but implanted chips do have drawbacks.

Their relatively large size means they block light that would have fallen on healthy parts of the retina and they can also cause tissue damage, such as tearing.

So Jeffrey Olsen at the University of Colorado Hospital has come up with another method entirely – amplifying the light that reaches the retina using the eye's still functioning light-sensitive cells.



Microscopic specks of semiconductor material injected into the retina can make the image a person sees brighter, a new patent application claims (Image: Wipo)
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:44 AM   #1320
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iamond 'wires' – quantum computing's best friend

* 12:18 23 December 2008 by Jeff Hecht
* For similar stories, visit the Quantum World Topic Guide

Using diamond to make micro circuits that channel light, not electricity, could help realise the elusive promise of quantum computing.

The allure of quantum computing is that it is able to solve problems which are near-impossible for conventional computers to crack, such as breaking very long cryptography keys.

Quantum computers hold "qubits" of information stored in the quantum properties of a system, for example, a single photon or a cloud of gas atoms in a gas. Diamond can be used to generate single photons and create qubits by writing information into their quantum states.

What's more, diamond can shield the photons from external influences, preventing unwanted modification of the stored data. And unlike other qubit techologies, which require supercooling, diamond operates fine at room temperature.

"All the essential elements for a quantum computer have been demonstrated in diamond," says Steven Prawer of the University of Melbourne, Australia
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:45 AM   #1321
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...rss&nsref=tech

Chameleon-like 'opal' can take on any colour



A new material could give a chameleon a run for its money - it can rapidly change colour to match that of any in the visible spectrum.

The synthetic material can be likened to an opal, a mineral that owes its variety of colours to its layered structure: regions with a high refractive index, in which light travels slowly, are interleaved with regions with a low refractive index. Light waves with a wavelength – or colour – similar to that of the space between layers are scattered in a way that gives opal its iridescent sheen.

The chameleon-like "opal" developed by British and Canadian chemists has a similar layered structure. But their material goes one better than nature. It can rapidly shrink or swell to change the distance between its layered regions, changing the colour of light that it scatters (see video above).
Silica stack

The starting point for the new material is a stack of silica marbles, each 270 nanometres across, on a flat electrode. A polymer is added on top to encase the spheres and to hold them in place. Next, the spheres are dissolved with acid to leave behind a regular pattern of air pockets inside the polymer. Finally, these pockets are filled with a liquid electrolyte and the structure is sealed.

The result behaves just like an opal. The polymer and electrolyte have different refractive indexes, and their repeating pattern scatters only blue photons to make the material an iridescent blue. But when a voltage is applied, the material becomes red, flitting across every other colour in the visible spectrum along the way.

"The polymer is crucial to the whole thing," says Ian Manners at the University of Bristol in the UK, and a member of the research team. "It contains iron atoms which can exist in two oxidative states."

When a voltage passes through the flat electrode, it draws out electrons from the polymer and oxidises the iron. That leaves the polymer positively charged and so negative ions from the electrolyte flood in. The oxidised iron's chemistry helps the polymer absorb the liquid, and the structure swells.

The pores shrink as the liquid inside them moves into the polymer. As a result the structure now scatters photons of a different wavelength and so has a different colour.
Good on paper

"The more you oxidise the system the more it swells," says Manners. Increasing the voltage slightly leads to more iron being oxidised, more swelling, and a greater shift towards red.

"We can currently get full spectrum tuning - blue all the way to red - in a little under 1 second," says Andre Arsenault, a member of the team and Manners's former PhD student.

Arsenault is chief technology officer at Opalux, a company he founded with fellow chemists from the University of Toronto. "Given the current switching speeds, an ideal first product may be something like full-colour electronic paper," he says. Although a pulse of voltage is needed to shift the colour, maintaining it in a given state requires no energy at all.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:46 AM   #1322
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...ef=online-news

Giant stinking flower reveals a hot secret



Night-time image of carrion flower with flash photography (left) and (right) with thermal image (Image copyright: Jörg Szarzynski)



You would think a flower that resembles a 3-metre phallus would have no problems attracting attention, especially if it also stinks like a rotting corpse.

But for the carrion flower, which has the world's largest flowering head, getting noticed by flesh-eating insect pollinators in its jungle home requires yet another amazing adaptation – and one that only came to light thanks to a serendipitous TV recording.

"The film crew was using very strong backlighting and suddenly we saw smoke rising up along the flower's central column. We thought the plant was on fire," says Wilhelm Barthlott from the University of Bonn in Germany.

The 'smoke' turned out to be steam that is puffed out in regular pulses, coinciding with waves of carrion scent. "We had wondered before why one moment the flower would stink like a dead donkey, and a little while later there would be hardly any smell. It never occurred to us that there was cyclic odour production."
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:47 AM   #1323
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/...ef=online-news

Blight hits world's vanilla supply

Savour the egg-nog while you can - a lethal disease is wiping out vanilla plantations in Madagascar, the world's major producer of the spice.

Last week Simeon Rakotomamonjy and his team at the National Center for Research Applied to Rural Development in Antananarivo reported that an unknown fungus has struck 80 per cent of plantations in two of the country's main growing areas.

They blame a price surge in the 1990s, which prompted farmers to plant seedlings too densely and without optimal shade and moisture. Since vanilla is propagated as cuttings it has little genetic diversity. Both factors make it a prime target for the fungal disease - which has yet to be properly diagnosed.

"Yet again a crop vital for poor farmers is getting killed off due to lack of funding for services that diagnose plant diseases," says Dagmar Hanold of the University of Adelaide, Australia.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:52 AM   #1324
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Washington, D.C., USA - The genetic mutation found in a small group of people helps protect their heart against the effects of high-fat diet, U.S. researchers reported Thursday.

It may open the door to new therapies for cardiovascular disease.
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Old 12-23-2008, 11:54 AM   #1325
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Small-Scale Smart Grid in Massachusetts

Julia Levitt
December 23, 2008 9:47 AM

3129522270_1c38ab2597.jpgA recent occurrence in a small New England town has us thinking that a working future for the smart garage -- a concept which promises symbiotic energy-sharing links between buildings, plug-in hybrid vehicles and the energy grid -- is not too far off.

When residents of Harvard, Massachusetts were hit with an ice storm that left many without power for a full four days, one innovative neighbor successfully used his Prius as a generator.

From last Friday's edition of the independent local publication The Harvard Press:

Around the corner at Madigan Lane, John Sweeney, a member of the town’s conservation-minded Heat Advisory Committee, took a characteristically green approach to powering his home during the storm. He reported his achievement in an e-mail, saying it was no big deal, but that his wife thought it an impressive tale worth sharing: Sweeney ran his refrigerator, freezer, TV, woodstove fan, and several lights through his Prius, for three days, on roughly five gallons of gas.

“When it looked like we were going to be without power for awhile, I dug out an inverter (which takes 12v DC and creates 120v AC from it) and wired it into our Prius…These inverters are available for about $100 many places online,” he wrote.

The device allowed the engine to run every half hour, automatically charging the car battery and indirectly supplying the required power.
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