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Old 10-16-2008, 12:58 PM   #576
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowspot66 View Post
Haha, they would probably think we all worshiped at the Church of Ronald McDonald and that there was a religious war between the Followers of Wendy and the Cult of the Burger King.
But Taco Bell destroyed them all.
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:03 PM   #577
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Only to face a new foe. The Flying Spaghetti Monster and his Church of Noodles & Company.
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:11 PM   #578
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Only to face a new foe. The Flying Spaghetti Monster and his Church of Noodles & Company.
Spongebob smote them all!
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:13 PM   #579
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Spongebob or Hanna Montana? I think we all know who has the power these days.
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:18 PM   #580
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Spongebob or Hanna Montana? I think we all know who has the power these days.
Dude, the Vagina has always had the power. Besides...what is disney trying to teach kids?




http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=61989
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:20 PM   #581
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I really don't know. Disney has gotten really weird in the last decade.
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:22 PM   #582
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check out that link to the sacrificial goddess thread -
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Old 10-16-2008, 01:32 PM   #583
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Just did. We sure do love a spectacle.

Did you ever catch the South Park episode that covers that exact same topic?

It makes you think. A lot of what we do or how we react has roots in our evolutionary development. I wonder what part the sacrificial goddess is connected to and why as a group we seem to enjoy the spectacle.

I do my best to avoid it but it's like a train wreck. There will inevitably be some headline or photograph so "what the ****?" that it will force me to at least glance at it.
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Old 10-17-2008, 05:49 AM   #584
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowspot66 View Post
Just did. We sure do love a spectacle.

Did you ever catch the South Park episode that covers that exact same topic?

It makes you think. A lot of what we do or how we react has roots in our evolutionary development. I wonder what part the sacrificial goddess is connected to and why as a group we seem to enjoy the spectacle.

I do my best to avoid it but it's like a train wreck. There will inevitably be some headline or photograph so "what the ****?" that it will force me to at least glance at it.


There's a part of me that feels like...that awareness is reaching a point that it's starting to make itself noticed.

I haven't seen the southpark one - mostly because i don't watch much TV. When i learned to step back and observe, that's when i became more aware of these things happening all around.

Humans and their rituals - it seems in someways we are designed for it (Routine, etc).
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Old 10-17-2008, 06:21 AM   #585
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1015120749.htm

10 Years On, High-school Social Skills Predict Better Earnings Than Test Scores

ScienceDaily (Oct. 16, 2008) — Ten years after graduation, high-school students who had been rated as conscientious and cooperative by their teachers were earning more than classmates who had similar test scores but fewer social skills, said a new University of Illinois study.

"..."My findings show that the most successful students are those who have not only high achievement test scores but also the kinds of social skills and behaviors that are highly rewarded by employers in the workplace," she said...."
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:25 AM   #586
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http://thecleaver.blogspot.com/2008/...for-shift.html
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:26 AM   #587
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http://www.philipcoppens.com/spheres.html

Rolling Stones

Bosnia not only has pyramids: it also has a number of enigmatic stone spheres, on par with similar balls found in Costa Rica several decades ago. So far, no-one has been able to explain the Middle American balls; can the Bosnian discovery assist in revealing their purpose?
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:28 AM   #588
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http://warofillusions.wordpress.com/...odies-at-will/

Harvard Gazette report on Tibetan monks who can heat up their bodies at will
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:29 AM   #589
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http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.p...t=va&aid=10489

Who Owns The Federal Reserve?
The Fed is privately owned. Its shareholders are private banks
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:35 AM   #590
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http://www.wariscrime.com/2008/09/24...etual-warfare/

Tom Clonan | The Irish Times
September 24, 2008

The US military sees the next 30 to 40 years as involving a state of continuous war against ideologically-motivated terrorists and competing with Russia and China for natural resources and markets, writes Tom Clonan.
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:36 AM   #591
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...al-Family.html

Buckingham Palace butler 'ran paedophile sex ring while working for the Royal Family'
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:46 AM   #592
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http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=4831



Imagine twisting a beam of light into a knot, as if it were a piece of a string. Now grab another light beam and tie it around the first, forming its own loop. Tie on another and another, until all of space is filled up with loops of light.

Sounds preposterous, but a pair of physicists has shown that light can do just this — at least in theory. Visible light, along with all other forms of electromagnetic radiation, is governed by Maxwell’s equations, and the researchers have found a new solution to these equations in which light forms linked knots. The team is now working to create light in this form experimentally.

It’s too soon to know what the applications of knotted light will be if they succeed, but possibilities include solving one of the problems that make it difficult to produce power from nuclear fusion and manipulating flows in an exotic state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate.

“This is very exciting,” says Antti Niemi of Uppsala University in Sweden, who is unaffiliated with the research. “If an observation is made where one sees stable knots in light, that would also tell us a lot about the mysteries of fundamental forces that we still do not understand.”

The story begins with a mathematical discovery in 1931. Heinz Hopf found a way of filling up all of space with circles. (More precisely, he made a map from the analogue of a sphere in four dimensions to the circle.) He started with a donut shape, which mathematicians call a torus. He imagined taking a piece of string and wrapping it smoothly around the torus so that the string passes through the “donut hole” once and around the outside once as well. Enough pieces of string placed alongside this first one could cover the entire surface of the torus.

Now he just had to fill all of space with tori. He packed them like Russian dolls, extending forever both inward and outward from the starting torus. The smallest torus would be so skinny that it would simply be a circle. The biggest torus would be so fat that the “donut hole” on the torus wouldn’t be a hole at all — it would form a line extending up so far that its two ends would meet only “at infinity.” By filling space with tori and covering tori with circles, Hopf put every point in space on some circle.

Mathematicians were excited about Hopf’s discovery (called the “Hopf fibration”) because it showed that high-dimensional spheres were more complex than imagined. But it wasn’t until 20 years ago that physicists realized the Hopf fibration had implications for electromagnetism: Antonio Fernández-Rañada of Complutense University in Madrid used the Hopf fibration to create a new solution to Maxwell’s equations, and thus an example of how electromagnetism can work. He was in search of a way to build a quantum theory for light without using quantum mechanics. He used the Hopf fibration, but did not consider whether, in an experiment, light could actually be forced to follow the circular paths.

William Irvine of New York University and Dirk Bouwmeester of the University of California, Santa Barbara stumbled across Rañada’s work around 10 years ago and realized that it might describe a form light could actually take. “The main thing we did is that we took this solution seriously,” Irvine says. The pair figured out how to turn Rañada’s solution into something that might conceivably be produced in the laboratory.

Irvine and Bouwmeester show theoretically that the shape the light rays formed would distort over time, with the individual torus shapes becoming twisted and misshapen. The individual loops the light would follow would also grow larger over time.

In special situations, however, the loops might be stable, such as if light travels through plasma instead of through free space. One of the problems that has plagued experimental nuclear fusion reactors is that the plasma at the heart of them moves faster and faster and tends to escape. That motion can be controlled with magnetic fields, but current methods to generate those fields still don’t do the job. If Irvine and Bouwmeester’s discovery could be used to generate fields that would send the plasma in closed, non-expanding loops and help contain it, “that would be extremely spectacular,” Bouwmeester says.

Rañada, whose work Bouwmeester and Irvine expanded upon, is excited about their discovery. “They’ve done outstanding work,” he says, “which most probably will have some surprising consequences.”
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:53 AM   #593
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http://www.philipcoppens.com/hawara.html



The Labyrinthine Search

Destroyed for some, intact and waiting to be discovered for others, the labyrinth of Hawara was one of ancient Egypt’s greatest achievements, on par, if not surpassing, the fame of the pyramids.
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:55 AM   #594
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http://today.uci.edu/news/release_detail.asp?key=1808

Scientists to study synthetic telepathy

Researchers get grant to develop communication system based on thoughts, not speech
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Old 10-17-2008, 11:56 AM   #595
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http://www.reuters.com/article/scien...BrandChannel=0

Scientists in Israel have discovered a new way to test for water pollution by "listening" to what the plants growing in water have to say.

By shining a laser beam on the tiny pieces of algae floating in the water, the researchers said they hear sound waves that tell them the type and amount of contamination in the water.

"It is a red light, telling us that something is beginning to go wrong with the quality of water," said Zvy Dubinsky, an aquatic biologist at Israel's Bar Ilan University. "Algae is the first thing to be affected by a change in water quality."

Although most of the earth is covered in water, 44 percent of the world's population live in areas with high water stress, and the number is likely to increase because of factors such as global warming and rising population.

As water sources deteriorate worldwide, the testing of algae could be used to monitor water quality faster, more cheaply and more accurately than techniques now in use, Dubinsky said.

The secret, he said, is to measure the rate of photosynthesis in the algae, meaning the plant's ability to transform light into energy. During photosynthesis, plants also release oxygen into the air.

Dubinsky's technique is easy to perform because of the over-abundance of algae in the planet's water. Most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes from algae.

A prototype tester, that occupies about one square meter of a laboratory desktop, shoots a laser beam at water samples to stimulate photosynthesis in the algae. But not all of the laser's heat is used.

Depending on the condition of the algae and the rate of photosynthesis, some of the heat is shot back into the water, creating sound waves, Dubinsky said.

With a special underwater microphone, researchers are able to analyze the strength of the sound waves and determine the health of the algae and the condition of the surrounding water.

"Algae suffering from lead poisoning, like waste discharged from battery and paint manufacturing plants, will produce a different sound than those suffering from lack of iron or exposure to other toxins," said researcher Yulia Pinchasov.

She said that testing algae photosynthesis can determine water quality more accurately and easily than labor-intensive methods now used like chemical and radioactive carbon testing.

With proper funding, Dubinsky said a commercial product could be ready in about two years.

The team has published its research in numerous scientific journals, most recently in the journal Hydrobiologia.

Article from: http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/
idUSLD33620320080814?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:00 PM   #596
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http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...-computer.html

Bio-Computer Created Inside Living Cel

Killer Computers

The new bio-computer consists of snippets of engineered RNA assembled inside a yeast cell.

RNA is a biological molecule similar to DNA, which encodes genetic information, such as how to make various proteins.

In engineering terms, the bio-computer's "inputs" are molecules floating around inside the cell. The "output" manifests as changes in protein production.

For example, an RNA computer may be able to bind with two different molecules. If both target molecules attach to it, they trigger the device to change shape.

The altered bio-computer is now the right shape to bind to DNA, where it can directly affect gene expression and ramp up or slow down the making of desired proteins.

Those proteins can affect the cell in various ways, such as killing it if it is cancerous.

New Awareness

Ehud Shapiro is a computer scientist and biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He was not involved in the study.

Shapiro's team had previously created a bio-computer using DNA that worked inside a test tube and could perform simple calculations, such as determining whether a list of zeros and ones contained an even number of ones.

But unlike the new RNA computer, Shapiro's test tube bio-computer was "oblivious" to its surroundings and could not interact with or be affected by its environs in any meaningful way, he said.

"The work of Smolke shows a computer that can respond to molecules inside a cell," said Shapiro, who wrote a review of the new study for Science.

Shapiro looks forward to a day when RNA computers are replaced by more sophisticated devices made from proteins.

"Proteins are the most efficient natural devices we know of," he said. "We know how to evolve RNA to do simple tasks, but do not know yet how to engineer proteins."
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:01 PM   #597
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1016124331.htm

Colossal Black Holes Common In Early Universe, Spectacular Galactic Collision Suggests

ScienceDaily (Oct. 16, 2008) — Astronomers think that many - perhaps all - galaxies in the universe contain massive black holes at their centers. New observations with the Submillimeter Array now suggest that such colossal black holes were common even 12 billion years ago, when the universe was only 1.7 billion years old and galaxies were just beginning to form.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7675193.stm

There's a new spark of life in iconic experiments first done in the 1950s, on the kind of primordial "soup" that may have predated life itself on Earth.



http://environment.newscientist.com/...-on-earth.html


Volcanic lightning may have sparked life on Earth
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:02 PM   #598
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http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/17/sc...ce&oref=slogin

From Old Vials, New Hints on Origin of Life



In 1953, Stanley L. Miller, then a graduate student of Harold C. Urey at the University of Chicago, put ammonia, methane and hydrogen — the gases believed to be in early Earth’s atmosphere — along with water in a sealed flask and applied electrical sparks to simulate the effects of lightning. A week later, amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, were generated out of the simple molecules.

Enshrined in high school textbooks, the Miller-Urey experiment raised expectations that scientists could unravel the origins of life with simple chemistry experiments.

The excitement has long since subsided. The amino acids never grew into the more complex proteins. Scientists now think the composition of air on early Earth was much different from what Dr. Miller used, leading some to question whether the Miller-Urey experiment had any relevance to the still unsolved problem of the origin of life.

After Dr. Miller’s death in May last year, Dr. Jeffrey L. Bada of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, who had been one of Dr. Miller’s graduate students, discovered cardboard boxes containing hundreds of vials of dried residues collected from the experiments conducted in 1953 and 1954.

Consulting Dr. Miller’s notebooks, Dr. Bada discovered that Dr. Miller had constructed two variations of the original apparatus. One simply used a different spark generator. The second injected steam onto the sparks.

That caught Dr. Bada’s attention, because the addition of steam seemed to replicate what might have existed in lagoons and tidal pools around volcanoes.
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:03 PM   #599
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http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...pt-abydos.html

Damaged Egyptian "Mecca" To Be Restored
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:04 PM   #600
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http://www.latimes.com/news/science/...,6406831.story

Report: Arctic temperatures at record highs, sea ice shrinking, reindeer declining

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