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Old 10-09-2008, 12:24 PM   #476
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Wasn't it a comic book...?

yes... I'm not really a fan of comics... but i do like alan and grant's work.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:22 AM   #477
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Geckos have long inspired scientists and super-hero fans alike with their ability to scamper up vertical walls and cling to ceilings with a single toe. In recent years, people have attempted to create materials that match those spectacular abilities, in the hope of creating new advanced adhesives, or even car braking systems.

Now US chemists claim to have made one based on nanotubes that it is 10 times stickier than some gecko feet. Even more impressively, like a real gecko foot, it can also be easily unstuck with a tug in the right direction.

Gecko's superhero toes are covered in microscopic hairs, known as setae, with even smaller branches at the tips, called spatulae.

These ensure that a gecko's foot has a large surface area in contact with any surface, maximising the weak but ever-present attraction between adjacent molecules known as the van der Waals force.
Glass gripper

Chemists led by Liming Dai of University of Dayton, Ohio and Zhong Lin Wang of Georgia Institute of Technology, made their artificial setae by growing nested carbon nanotubes on a silicon wafer.

They controlled the growth process to make a forest of vertical nanotube trunks turning into a canopy of tangled ends on top. The curly entangled mess acts like natural spatulae – when pressed against a surface, they have a large contact area and hence a strong hold.

The new material was tested for stickiness on surfaces ranging from Teflon to sandpaper. Attached to a glass surface, a 4mm2 piece of the material can support over 1600 grams when pulled roughly parallel to the surface (see video, right).

That is around 10 times better than some species of gecko and three times better than the best artificial competitor.

But removing a pad of the material is simple, unlike some rival materials. Pulling it perpendicular to a surface means only the tips of the nanotubes remain in contact with the surface, and the setae will easily loosen their grip. A weight of 160 grams on the tiny sample is enough to do that.
New glue?

Kellar Autumn from the Lewis and Clark College, Oregon, was the first to suggest that the gecko's stickiness was down to geometry rather than the chemistry of its feet (see Gecko's gravity-defying trick explained). "The ability of this material to support large shear loads and to detach easily is very encouraging," he told New Scientist.

He points out, though, that although a person can easily stick the material to a surface, it requires much more force to apply than real gecko setae. A 4 millimetre2 piece of the new material needs about 2 kilograms of force to stick, compared to the few grams required by a real gecko or some synthetic rivals.

Liming thinks his material should still be able to replace glue and other forms of adhesion. For example, because nanotubes are excellent conductors, the carbon setae could replace solder in electronics. The material could also be valuable in the vacuum of space, where traditional adhesives dry out quickly, he says.

As for superhero suits, Liming says: "We will exploit this possibility, if there is a serious need."

Economics is likely to play a deciding role too – carbon nanotubes are not cheap to produce. But the price has already declined more than a thousand fold over the last few years as fabrication processes have improved. Liming says dropping prices will eventually make it possible to produce his material in rolls rather than one-off sections.

Journal reference: Science (DOI: 10.1126/science.1159503)


http://technology.newscientist.com/a...d-of-glue.html
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:23 AM   #478
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http://www.egypttoday.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=8196

Pyramids Makeover


The last of the Seven Ancient Wonders gets a twenty-first century facelift, but pleasing everyone proves to be a difficult task
The site of the 5,000-year-old Giza Pyramids is now up to speed with the twenty-first century, complete with cameras, lasers and control rooms. Last month, part of a multi-phase plan to renovate the site of the only remaining Wonder of the Ancient World was completed, a modern makeover cooked up by the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) to make the Giza Plateau more tourist-friendly.


The first phase, costing roughly LE 60 million, includes an 18-kilometer-long steel fence equipped with 199 closed circuit TV cameras, infrared motion sensors and elaborate control rooms placed alongside the fence. In addition to the reinforced boundaries, the plan dedicated one of three entrances, the one near the Mena House Oberoi Resort, as the primary security entrance, kitted out with x-ray machines and metal detectors.

While the modernizing of the most ancient site in the world — one that was previously an uncontrolled sandbox of pandemonium — has tourists and international media impressed, it has left local peddlers and bazaar sellers locked out and worried about their livelihood.

According to Sabri Abd El Eziz, assistant to SCA Secretary General Zahi Hawass, the plan was put in motion about seven years ago. After finishing site management for all the areas in Upper Egypt — including Abu Simbel, Luxor, Philae and Kom Ombo — the SCA’s plan for 2008-2009 was to focus on the pyramids. “There are roughly 6,000 to 10,000 visitors daily at the Pyramids and though we accommodate them easily, there was a need for a [facelift],” says Abd El Eziz.

A principal reason for the developments was that the SCA, although part of the Ministry of Culture, needs to find ways to be self-sufficient. “The SCA doesn’t take money from the government; we depend on entrance fees and exhibitions both locally and abroad, as well as royalties,” says Abd El Eziz. With the previously lax control over the Pyramids area, income from entrance fees was approximately LE 300,000 daily. “After the fence and the setting-up of a proper entrance, income is now around LE 800,000 [] and that’s money that we use for maintaining museums and restoring antiquities.”
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:24 AM   #479
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http://www.latimes.com/news/science/...,1021420.story


Scientists: DNA testing proves Virginia shark's pup a 'virgin birth'; 2nd case ever confirmed
By STEVE SZKOTAK, Associated Press Writer
3:30 AM PDT, October 10, 2008
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) _ Scientists have confirmed the second case of a "virgin birth" in a shark.

In a study reported Friday in the Journal of Fish Biology, scientists said DNA testing proved that a pup carried by a female Atlantic blacktip shark in the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center contained no genetic material from a male.

The first documented case of asexual reproduction, or parthenogenesis, among sharks involved a pup born to a hammerhead at an Omaha, Neb., zoo.

"This first case was no fluke," Demian Chapman, a shark scientist and lead author of the second study, said in a statement. "It is quite possible that this is something female sharks of many species can do on occasion."

The aquarium sharks that reproduced without mates each carried only one pup, while some shark species can produce litters numbering in the dozen or more. The scientists cautioned that the rare asexual births should not be viewed as a possible solution to declining global shark populations.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:24 AM   #480
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...r-windows.html

The ultra-thin solar cells that could generate power through windows

By Claire Bates
Last updated at 11:11 AM on 06th October 2008

* Comments (1)
* Add to My Stories

Solar cells that are transparent enough to be used to tint windows on buildings or cars, have been developed by U.S researchers.

Conventional solar cells are bulky and rigid but lightweight cells are usually far less efficient. However, a new method of making the silicon-based devices could create thin, flexible cells without any trade-offs.

Brittle wafers of silicon are sliced into ultra-thin pieces and carefully 'printed' onto a malleable surface. The cells are so flexible they can be rolled around a pencil.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:31 AM   #481
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The shark thing sorta freaks me out - something about the way birds are dying, bees, and now reptiles/amphibians/fish are freaking out -
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:33 AM   #482
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No need to worry.

Mom's just trying to fix herself.
Oh i'm not worried yo - i know how to swim...
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:43 AM   #483
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See ya at AZ bay then.


You might get beach front property where you're at too
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:48 AM   #484
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Ahso - i don't own anything other than myself and my subaru - and well....pheaa...lol
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:50 AM   #485
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http://cryptogon.com/?p=4429

The Mystery of the Missing Opium
October 10th, 2008

Ask MI6 where it is.

Via: BBC:

It’s a mystery that has got British law enforcement officials and others across the planet scratching their heads. Put bluntly, enough heroin to supply the world’s demand for years has simply disappeared.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) describes the situation as “a time bomb for public health and global security”.

This week’s Map of the Week comes courtesy of the UNODC. It shows their latest estimate of opium production in Afghanistan - another bumper year.

A crop of 7,700 tonnes will produce around 1,100 tonnes of heroin - it basically works on a 7:1 ratio.The mystery is that the global demand for heroin is less than half that. In other words, Afghanistan only needs to produce 3,500 tonnes to satisfy every known heroin user on the planet.

Look at the graph, though.

For the past three years, production has been running at almost twice the level of global demand. The numbers just don’t add up.

Research Credit: EB, MT, others, sorry lots of email
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:52 AM   #486
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http://www.alterati.com/blog/?p=2088

This movie is in production right now. I just ran across the site at americanthemovie.com and dug up this information at IMDB:

Matt Harlock has been writing/directing film for 10 years through his own production company halflife films. His current film project is ‘American: The Bill Hicks Story’, a new feature length documentary for the BBC and DVD release that Matt developed with Paul Thomas after establishing contact with the Hick’s estate over four years ago by organising tribute nights to the late comedian in London.

This is not the same as the possible film about Bill Hicks, with Russell Crowe. Either way, something tells me we’ll be hearing a lot more about Bill Hicks next year.


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Old 10-10-2008, 07:55 AM   #487
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http://theparanormalpastor.blogspot....angle-ufo.html

http://theparanormalpastor.blogspot....nsylvania.html
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:58 AM   #488
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http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html

When two protons collide in an accelerator, they are transformed into muons and other particles. One Russian physicist offers this analogy: it's like two Soviet Fiats colliding to produce a bus and a Mercedes Benz 600. That's the thing about high-energy physics: the total is different than the sum of its parts.

So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

From what we know about radiation, about 500 to 600 rads is enough to kill a person (though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound). The left side of his face swollen beyond recognition, Bugorski was taken to a clinic in Moscow so that doctors could observe his death over the following two to three weeks.

Over the next few days, skin on the back of his head and on his face just next to his left nostril peeled away to reveal the path the beam had burned through the skin, the skull, and the brain tissue. The inside of his head continued to burn away: all the nerves on the left were gone in two years, paralyzing that side of his face. Still, not only did Bugorski not die, but he remained a normally functioning human being, capable even of continuing in science. For the first dozen years, the only real evidence that something had gone neurologically awry were occasional petit mal seizures; over the last few years Bugorski has also had six grand mals. The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Because virtually everything connected with nuclear energy was kept secret in the Soviet Union, for more than a decade Bugorski observed an unspoken ban on talking about his accident. About twice a year he went to the Moscow radiation clinic to be examined and to commune with other members of the brotherhood of nuclear-accident victims. "Like former inmates, we are always aware of one another," he says. "There aren't that many of us, and we know one another's life stories. Generally, these are sad tales."
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Old 10-10-2008, 08:14 AM   #489
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"UFO behaviour is more akin to magic than to physics as we know it... the modern UFOnauts and the demons of past days are probably identical." -Dr. Pierre Guerin
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:24 AM   #490
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http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html

When two protons collide in an accelerator, they are transformed into muons and other particles. One Russian physicist offers this analogy: it's like two Soviet Fiats colliding to produce a bus and a Mercedes Benz 600. That's the thing about high-energy physics: the total is different than the sum of its parts.

So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

From what we know about radiation, about 500 to 600 rads is enough to kill a person (though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound). The left side of his face swollen beyond recognition, Bugorski was taken to a clinic in Moscow so that doctors could observe his death over the following two to three weeks.

Over the next few days, skin on the back of his head and on his face just next to his left nostril peeled away to reveal the path the beam had burned through the skin, the skull, and the brain tissue. The inside of his head continued to burn away: all the nerves on the left were gone in two years, paralyzing that side of his face. Still, not only did Bugorski not die, but he remained a normally functioning human being, capable even of continuing in science. For the first dozen years, the only real evidence that something had gone neurologically awry were occasional petit mal seizures; over the last few years Bugorski has also had six grand mals. The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Because virtually everything connected with nuclear energy was kept secret in the Soviet Union, for more than a decade Bugorski observed an unspoken ban on talking about his accident. About twice a year he went to the Moscow radiation clinic to be examined and to commune with other members of the brotherhood of nuclear-accident victims. "Like former inmates, we are always aware of one another," he says. "There aren't that many of us, and we know one another's life stories. Generally, these are sad tales."

Very interesting - it was a concentrated beam which only affected his head. Neurons are among the most resistant cells in our body to radiation - mainly because they aren't dividing. Bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract are the first to go in most radiation poisonings leading to overwhelming infection and death.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:25 AM   #491
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http://www.technoccult.com/archives/...tech-goldmine/
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:14 AM   #492
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here i am always with you
treading down to your heart
where the sun rose and set
simple beauty given
she showed her glory
in the midnight silver
she rose again in gold
i watched her change
song and tune
thoughts falling like footsteps
leaves raining upon a walked path hidden
to where a staff was given
Raise up! She sang in birds
Listen! She she said in the stream
you've been blank, waiting
for new illumnination.
Take these gifts
understand your defined drawing lines,
symbols, minterets, and alphabets
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:16 AM   #493
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http://www.fractogene.com/
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:19 AM   #494
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http://www.brainsturbator.com/site/c...new_cosmology/

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Buddhabrot Mandelbrot VisualizationWe talk about the third dimension a lot, but most humans don’t live in it. Abbot’s Flatland was not so much a metaphor as an operational description of the sensory world most people inhabit: a continuous, unbroken plane that, despite surface variations and wrinkles, remains a flat stage for our two dimensional lives. This is inevitable, since humans cannot hover or fly without technology assistance, and few of us can jump higher than three feet off the ground.

And let’s be serious, here—what is a dimension? Have anyone ever even proved they existed? Sure, you can draw a Cartesian XYZ grid on paper, but you can also draw a unicorn vomiting angels. I’ve been digging through the concept of time for a month, and it’s a concept nobody can really define, despite the fact we all experience it. I’ve come to realize there’s very little humans can say for sure about space, either. The more we learn, the less we know. Everything you were taught in school is currently falling apart—so let’s take a look at a theory that will likely be replacing all this Big Bang horse****: the Universe is fractal and infinite at every level of scale.

Rethinking Occam’s Razor

“Each time we formulate a hypothesis, we take the simplest one possible. But what obligates the Universe to be simple?”

--James Peebles

I seriously question the assumption that the simplest explanation is usually the best. I find it truly bizarre that after the past century of scientific discovery, which has shown every single aspect of our Universe to be stranger and more complex than we ever thought possible, people still discuss the concept of Occam’s Razor with a straight face. Of course, most people having that discussion don’t even know Occam’s Razor, since the literal translation goes like this:

“...entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity.”

Before I dismiss the concept, I want to bring up one of the more interesting cognitive biases that humans are afflicted with: The Conjunction Fallacy. As puts it in his excellent paper, “Cognitive Biases Affecting Assessment of Global Risk”:

According to probability theory, adding additional detail onto a story must render the story less probable. Yet human psychology seems to follow the rule that adding an additional detail can make the story more plausible.

Of course, once you really dig into the field of cognitive bias, you’re left with the disturbing realization that our brain is just a hall of mirrors run by a monkey. It can be hard to get work done under those circumstances, so the less said about it, the better.

*That was from sept 21st - today i see this in the news:

http://space.newscientist.com/articl...-universe.html

Galaxy map hints at fractal universe

* 00:00 25 June 2008
* NewScientist.com news service
* Amanda Gefter


s the matter in the universe arranged in a fractal pattern? A new study of nearly a million galaxies suggests it is – though there are no well-accepted theories to explain why that would be so.

Cosmologists trying to reconstruct the entire history of the universe have precious few clues from which to work. One key clue is the distribution of matter throughout space, which has been sculpted for nearly 14 billion years by the competing forces of gravity and cosmic expansion. If there is a pattern in the sky, it encodes the secrets of the universe.

A lot is at stake, and the matter distribution has become a source of impassioned debate between those who say the distribution is smooth and homogeneous and those who say it is hierarchically structured and clumpy, like a fractal.

Nearly all physicists agree that on relatively small scales the distribution is fractal-like: hundreds of billions of stars group together to form galaxies, galaxies clump together to form clusters, and clusters amass into superclusters.

The point of contention, however, is what happens at even larger scales. According to most physicists, this Russian doll-style clustering comes to an end and the universe, on large scales, becomes homogeneous.

___


Both stories are cont'd on their sites - so check it out


http://www.fractogene.com/

FractoGene IP portfolio

A fractal geometrical generalization of the "gene" concept of the 100-year old "genetics":
The new Chapter of Dr. Pellionisz' contribution to the Algorithmic Approach to Neuro- and Genome Biology.

Protein sythesis is not achieved by a masterstroke of "gene" information.
It is an iterative process with recursive access to DNA information:





Ultraconserved Sequences: The Core Code of DNA?

Funny thing about DNA science: when huge breakthroughs get proclaimed, they generally only lead to more questions and collapse into hype upon any serious scrutiny. Likewise, when baffling new mysteries are announced, they tend to point the way towards a fuller understanding of the DNA cipher. Case in point — this weekend’s headline, Mysterious DNA Found to Survive Eons of Evolution.

The precise term is “ultraconserved sequences,” and as one observer on the RI forum eloquently summarized it, “this mutation-free DNA has shared eveolutionary benefits through out the entire class Mammilia without producing a visible or identifiable shared characteristic.” More meat from the article itself:

…about 500 regions of our DNA have apparently remained intact throughout the history of mammalian evolution, or the past 80 million to 100 million years, basically free of mutations. The researchers call these mystery snippets “ultraconserved regions,” and found that they are about 300 times less likely than other regions of the genome to be lost during the course of mammalian evolution. “These regions seem to be under intense purifying selection — almost no mutations take hold permanently,” said researcher Gill Bejerano.

Technoccult readers might also be interested in the lucid heresy of Dr. Andras J. Pellionisz, author of the Fractogene website. This new discovery connects quite perfectly with the Pellionisz theory that genes aren’t a sequential list of instructions but rather a fractal and iterative template for organic growth. I would also highly recommend the work of Chris King, who’s been making the same assertion about the fabric of the entire universe. He recently published a dense but readable 7 page summary of his work, Why the Universe is Fractal, that’s worth printing out and chewing over.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:20 AM   #495
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http://www.livescience.com/health/08...stery-dna.html

Mysterious DNA Found to Survive Eons of Evolution
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:22 AM   #496
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http://www.math.auckland.ac.nz/~king...ints/index.htm
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:23 AM   #497
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http://www.technoccult.com/archives/...u-mississippi/



I’ve been collecting a history of Temporary Autonomous Zones. I’m grateful to Hakim Bey for the conceptual phrase, but his history was more romantic than tactically useful…and after all, he is something of a pedo. So in honor of the TAZ going down right now in PDX — YOU KNOW ABOUT ESOZONE, YES?? — I’ll be sharing some of the best stories this weekend.

One of my favorite corners of Southern History was an all-black community hidden in Northern Mississippi. The story of Mound Bayou stretches across centuries and winds through everything from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement. Sadly, Mound Bayou exists almost nowhere online. The Wikipedia is shallow filler, and most of the online histories are short and sloppy.

Isaiah Montgomery and Ben Green founded Mound Bayou in 1887, but the story begins with Montgomery’s father, Ben, who was a slave on the David Bend plantation. For most folks alive today, our images of a plantation are based on Roots, but things were very different at Davis Bend. It was owned by Joeseph Davis (the brother of Confederate president Jefferson Davis) and he was heavily inspired by the “socialist utopianism” of an obscure thinker named Robert Owen.

As a side note, Technoccult readers might be interested to know that “Owen insisted he could communicate with great minds of the past by means of electricity.” The precise details are lost to history, but it should be noted Owens was unusually blunt after death, telling Spritualist mediums who summoned him “Oh! How you have misunderstood the laws which connect spirit with spirit…you will never understand these things…”

David Bend was an experiment in education and empowerment, and yes, I do realize how absurd that sounds when I’m still talking about white people owning slaves. Rather than draconian dormitory conditions, though, Joeseph Davis encouraged his slaves to educate themselves and even own businesses. In the aftermath of the Civil War, Davis sold his land holdings to Ben Montgomery, who had run the plantation store. The price was $300,000 in gold, and with that David Bend became one of the first autonomous black communities in the South.

The Owen-inspired focus on learning and skills carried into Mound Bayou, especially when Booker T. Washington got involved later on. This isn’t just a look into the past, though: I think that Mound Bayou has a signifigant lesson to offer us here in 2008. During the many “exodus” movements which happened throughout the history of both Davis Bend and Mound Bayou, the Montgomery family was adamant about building a strong foundation instead of leaving for the mere promise of something better. Most importantly, the education they focused on was agricultural tech and self-sufficiency techniques:

Through outlets like the town’s newspaper, The Demonstrator (1900), Mound Bayou promoted education as an essential path to community survival, in particular vocational education in scientific agriculture through the Mound Bayou Normal and Industrial Institute.

Here in 2008, John Robb, one of my favorite Big Thinkers and the author of Brave New War, has been doing an amazing series of short, potent articles revolving around global systems collapse and the concept of the Resilient Community. Although fairy tales like Gabriele D’Annunzio taking over Fiume are beautiful, they’re not realistic or sustainable solutions. Mound Bayou is a model that lasted, and it was based on smart design and hard work, not poetry and wine.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:28 AM   #498
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:01 PM   #499
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:03 PM   #500
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