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Old 09-16-2008, 06:55 AM   #401
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http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...skeletons.html

Deep inside an underwater cave in Mexico, archaeologists may have discovered the oldest human skeleton ever found in the Americas. Dubbed Eva de Naharon, or Eve of Naharon, the female skeleton has been dated at 13,600 years old. If that age is accurate, the skeleton—along with three others found in underwater caves along the Caribbean coast of the Yucatán Peninsula—could provide new clues to how the Americas were first populated.

The remains have been excavated over the past four years near the town of Tulum, about 80 miles southwest of Cancún, by a team of scientists led by Arturo González, director of the Desert Museum in Saltillo, Mexico.

"We don't now how [the people whose remains were found in the caves] arrived and whether they came from the Atlantic, the jungle, or inside the continent," González said. "But we believe these finds are the oldest yet to be found in the Americas and may influence our theories of how the first people arrived."

In addition to possibly altering the time line of human settlement in the Americas, the remains may cause experts to rethink where the first Americans came from, González added.

Clues from the skeletons' skulls hint that the people may not be of northern Asian descent, which would contradict the dominant theory of New World settlement. That theory holds that ancient humans first came to North America from northern Asia via a now submerged land bridge across the Bering Sea.

"The shape of the skulls has led us to believe that Eva and the others have more of an affinity with people from South Asia than North Asia," González explained.

Concepción Jiménez, director of physical anthropology at Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, has viewed the finds and says they may be Mexico's oldest and most important human remains to date.

"Eva de Naharon has the paleo-indian characteristics that make the date seem very plausible," Jiménez said.
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Old 09-16-2008, 06:57 AM   #402
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http://space.newscientist.com/articl...1_head_dn14738


Space 'firefly' resembles no known object

* 00:06 16 September 2008
* NewScientist.com news service
* Maggie McKee

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The object responsible for the mysterious brightening (right, from observations made in May 2006) is ordinarily too dim to detect (left) (Image: Barbary et al.)
The object responsible for the mysterious brightening (right, from observations made in May 2006) is ordinarily too dim to detect (left) (Image: Barbary et al.)
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* Barbary et al. abstract



An object that brightened intensely and then faded back into obscurity over a period of about seven months is unlike anything astronomers have seen before, a new study reports.

The object, called SCP 06F6, was first spotted in the constellation Bootes in February 2006 in a search for supernovae by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Nothing had been seen at its location before it started to brighten, and nothing was spotted after it dimmed. That suggests it is normally too faint to observe and that it brightened by at least 120 times during its firefly-like episode.

Stars are known to brighten dramatically when they explode as supernovae. But supernovae reach their maximum brightness after about 20 days, and this object took a leisurely 100 days to hit its peak.

The object's spectrum is also bizarre. It does not match that of anything seen in the mammoth Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which has mapped more than a quarter of the sky.



The object responsible for the mysterious brightening (right, from observations made in May 2006) is ordinarily too dim to detect (left) (Image: Barbary et al.)
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:00 AM   #403
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http://www.moreintelligentlife.com/s...-at-everything

HOW TO CHEAT AT EVERYTHING

* FINE & PERFORMING ARTS
* Miscellany

TIPS FROM A CON MAN | August 17th 2008
Over lunch with Simon Lovell, a fascinating former card shark, Allison Schrager learns all sorts of things about how swindlers operate ...
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:00 AM   #404
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
http://www.thothweb.com/article6763.html

Scientists Interested In Large Footprint DiscoveryAnimals & Cryptozoology
Posted on Tuesday, September 09, 2008 (CDT) by Thoth
Fossil Imprint Is 11 Inches Wide, 15 inches Long.A retired Cookeville builder has discovered a mysterious set of large footprints on his property. Harold Jackson is an amateur archaeologist who enjoys collecting arrowheads and other Native American artifacts. But the most extraordinary find of his life came on his property near the Caney Fork River.

For months he stepped on a rock near his house that caught his eye. Finally, he brought the unusual rock home and cleaned it up. After all of the mud was removed, a remarkable discovery was revealed.

"I don't know anything about archaeology or anything, but if you look at it, it's a footprint. No animal footprint looks like that. Now, if it's a Native American, an Indian, then he was a big Indian," said Jackson. "(The print) is about 11 inches wide and about 15 inches long." Jackson said the fossilized print clearly shows the heel and all five toes.

"It's got to be thousands of years old," said Jackson.

About half-a-dozen scientists said they want to look at the print, including Dr. Jeffrey Meldrum, a famous Bigfoot professor at Idaho State University. Meldrum collects Bigfoot prints from all over the world.

Jackson said the print has made him a believer in Bigfoot.

"It was just hard for me to believe. But listen, after I found this print, there's a Bigfoot out there somewhere. I don't know what kind of Bigfoot it is, but there's a Bigfoot out there somewhere," said Jackson.

Channel 4 has yet to reach Meldrum or Tennessee state archaeologist Nick Fielder to comment on the artifact.

Jackson said there is another similar-sized large fossilized foot imprint on his property but has been unable to extract it from the rock.

Copyright: WSMV Nashville
I imagine down the line Shaq's footprints will lend more evidence towards Bigfoot.
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:01 AM   #405
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http://www.mania.com/lair-beasts-sea...cle_87259.html

LAIR OF THE BEASTS: In Search of the Death-Worm

By: Nick Redfern
Date: Saturday, September 13, 2008

As someone who spends pretty much his entire life chasing, investigating, and writing about mysterious beasts and diabolical monsters, I have to admit that I have come across some extremely wild and far-out stories in my time – and that’s putting it mildly!

But, the one strange creature that fascinates and intrigues me perhaps more than any other, is the aptly- and intriguingly-named Mongolian Death-Worm.

Now you might very reasonably ask: what on Earth can be so deadly about a mere worm? Well, I’ll tell you. And it has absolutely nothing at all to do with the sort of worm you might find in your back-yard.

Rumored to inhabit the sands of Mongolia’s harsh Gobi Desert, this particular worm is said to be a lean, mean, killing-machine of electrifying proportions. And I do mean that quite literally.

Local legend among the tribal folk that inhabit the region tells of a fearsome, writhing, worm-like beast – five-feet in length and bright red in color, no less – that has the ability to kill its prey by spitting a mouthful of sulfuric acid in their direction. Nice!

(cont'd on site)
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:02 AM   #406
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Not sure if you put it up on here, but have you been discussing that particle accellerator and the god particle they're expecting to find (but Hawking bet against)?
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:05 AM   #407
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Originally Posted by TheReverend View Post
I imagine down the line Shaq's footprints will lend more evidence towards Bigfoot.
I'm torn on bigfoot. I think it's possible that they do/did exist. Lack of a body/carcass/etc is the only thing missing - i'm not saying there aren't hoaxes - but the world is often stranger than it seems often times...

Then this guy:

http://www.stevequayle.com/Giants/index2.html

Has done work on Giants - it's interesting...
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:08 AM   #408
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Originally Posted by TheReverend View Post
Not sure if you put it up on here, but have you been discussing that particle accellerator and the god particle they're expecting to find (but Hawking bet against)?
I've been following it, but not discussing it. I think those looking for such a particle are thinking too small about it.
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:24 AM   #409
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http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/09/sc...in&oref=slogin

As Barriers Disappear, Some Gender Gaps Widen
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:34 AM   #410
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http://www.spiked-online.com/Articles/00000006DFED.htm

Does al-Qaeda exist?
Not in the way that we think, say some terrorism experts.
by Brendan O'Neill

'Al-Qaeda bombing foiled' says the front page of today's UK Sun, reporting the arrest yesterday of 24-year-old student Sajid Badat in Gloucester, England, on suspicion of involvement in terrorist activity. Other reports have referred to Badat as 'having links with al-Qaeda' and being a potential 'suicide bomber' (1).

Also this week, media reports claim that al-Qaeda may have developed 'car-bomb capability' in the USA, and that al-Qaeda has compiled a 'kidnappers' manual' and is plotting to snatch American troops from Iraq and other parts of the Middle East. Every day since the 9/11 attacks of 2001 there have been media reports about al-Qaeda - its leaders, members, capabilities, bank accounts, reach and threat. What is this al-Qaeda? Does such a group even exist?

Some terrorism experts doubt it. Adam Dolnik and Kimberly McCloud reckon it's time we 'defused the widespread image of al-Qaeda as a ubiquitous, super-organised terror network and call it as it is: a loose collection of groups and individuals that doesn't even refer to itself as al-Qaeda'. Dolnik and McCloud - who first started studying terrorism at the prestigious Monterey Institute of International Studies in California - claim it was Western officials who imposed the name 'al-Qaeda' on to disparate radical Islamic groups and who blew Osama bin Laden's power and reach 'out of proportion'. Both are concerned about the threat of terror, but argue that we should 'debunk the myth of al-Qaeda' (2).
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:37 AM   #411
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http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2...xperiment.html

Angel Dust Inspired a new Schizophrenia Drug

hen scientists learned that PCP, also known as angel dust, can cause every single symptom of schizophrenia, they wondered if chemicals that have the opposite effect could fight mental disorders. That insight led to them to discover a new class of antipsychotic medications.

To understand how the recreational drug plays tricks on the mind, neuroscientists gave it to lab rats. Those researchers could counteract the strange behavior of their furry assistants by stimulating brain proteins called glutamate receptors. Big drug companies, including Eli Lilly, took note of that discovery and started searching for molecules that can push the same psychological buttons in humans.

In the Sep 15 issue of Chemical and Engineering News, Carmen Drahl told that story, along with the tales of three other experimental medications that could turn the tide against schizophrenia. Each compound operates in a completely different way, and all of them have been tested on human volunteers.

That is really big news because doctors have been stuck using the same class of pills -- dopamine blockers -- since the 1950's.

Drahl got the scoop on the new treatments during a special seminar about schizophrenia, which took place last month during the American Chemical Society meeting in Philadelphia.

LY404039 was discovered by Eli Lilly and works by activating glutamate receptors. It is furthest along in the approval process. Unlike other schizophrenia drugs, it does not cause excessive weight gain.
DCCCyB was developed by Merck, and it does the job by blocking glycine transporters
PF-2545920 was tested by Pfizer, and it gums up a phosphodiesterase enzyme.
TC-5619 was invented at Targacept and it excites nicotine receptors with far more precision than the finest cigarettes. Schizophrenics tend to medicate themselves by smoking, and new drug may offer them a similar kind of relief without the serious health risks that come from tobacco products.

If these drugs are approved by the FDA, the social implications could be profound: A great deal of homelessness is caused by psychological problems. Perhaps some of these new substances will allow people with serious mental illness to become functional and live somewhat normal lives.
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:43 AM   #412
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http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damn...-Stargate.html

Large Hadron Collider claims its first victim (plus have ritual suicides opened the Stargate?)

Looks like the world didn't end for all of us because of the Large Hadron Collider but it did for one poor girl:

A 17-year-old girl committed suicide in Madhya Pradesh's Rajgarh district fearing the end of the world in the most ambitious scientific experiment in Geneva to fathom the mysteries of creation, the police said Wednesday.

Chhaya, resident of Rajgarh district's Sarangpur town, consumed tablets of sulphas (an insecticide) Tuesday after watching news on TV channels about the Geneva experiment in which the world's largest collider will recreate conditions of the earliest universe.


One odd touch:

India has presented CERN with a huge bronze statue of Nataraja, Lord Shiva performing his dance of creation and destruction.


Source

This is very much like the boy who thought he caused 911 and the man who believes he is responsible for global warming. What's worse is that it doesn't make any sense - if the world died slowly there would be plenty of time to kill yourself before the end and if it all happened in the blink of an eye there would be no suffering (unless you think you'd be trapped just beyond the event horizon with your agony prolonged until the end of the universe, I suppose). Of course, sense is rarely a factor in such sad events.

Sense also seems to be rather lacking in the other, wilder story to emerge from the LHC going live. However, you'll have to read that below the fold.


Ritual suicides open the Stargate

The site WhatDoesitMean.com always manages to put a wild spin on the news, usually using some current event as a launchpad to a story which feels like it has crossed the line into fiction, usually using secret sources that are impossible to verify. As one might expect the LHC is no exception, so hold on to your hats (and turn your critical thinking motor up to 11):

A most strange FSB report is making its rounds in the Kremlin today that says over 20 US Soldiers from the United States Army’s 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, tasked with providing security for the ancient Iraqi city of Babylon, and based in the Iraqi city of Hilla, have committed ‘mass suicide’ after their attempt to ‘link’ what is described as an ancient ‘stargate’ to CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, and which is about to begin one of the most controversial science experiments in human history, and as we can read.

...

To the mass suicide of these US Soldiers we can also read as reported by Iran’s Press TV News Service:

“Iraqi security sources have revealed that 21 US troops had committed suicide inside a former Iraqi air force base 27 days ago, Fars News Agency reported on Monday.

According to the sources, the 21 troops were treated in a hospital but only five soldiers have survived and they are in a critical condition. Security officials said they used potent narcotics to kill themselves. "The bodies of the US troops became misshapen[in] such a way that they looked like 5000-year mummies," said a witness.”

It should be noted that Russian Intelligence Analysts have long reported on these Western Nations attempts to reestablish ‘contact’ with their ancient gods, and as we had previously reported on in our April 16, 2006 report, “Mysterious ‘Ritual’ Performed By United States Military Forces In Babylon Raises Concerns Of Muslim And Russian Orthodox Religious Leaders”, in which we had detailed the most true history of these peoples, and also issued a warning to them.

Source

Oh boy. It then goes on to discuss feathered serpents, Easter, mystic eggs and some other stuff that only seemed tangentially connected but you'll have tor read that for yourself. If you dare!!! Or if you can be bothered. Me? I think I'll wait until the DVD comes out.
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Old 09-16-2008, 07:53 AM   #413
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http://webecoist.com/2008/09/07/17-a...als-in-nature/

Fractals: they’re famously found in nature and artists have created some incredible renderings as well. Fractals are purely a wonder - too irregular for Euclidean geometry; iterative and recursive and seemingly infinite. They turn up in food and germs, plants and animals, mountains and water and sky. Here are seventeen stunning examples:
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:27 PM   #414
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http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...terstitialskip

A controversial new X-ray technology is being tested that could stop potential terrorists from blowing up a car bomb at one of the nation's airports, homeland security officials say.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is running a test at a North Carolina ferry terminal of a 21-foot-high arch-like machine that shoots low-intensity X-rays at cars as they pass through. The photos show whether explosives or drugs might be in the car.

The technology, called backscatter X-ray, is in use at several airports to screen passengers. Privacy advocates have denounced scanning people as invasive because the X-rays can see through clothes.

Melissa Ngo, a Washington, D.C., lawyer who focuses on privacy issues, says using the technology for cars could pave the way for "Big Brother" government spying.

"If this technology ends up being deployed widely, it seems to be another step toward a society where you need to accept surveillance in every part of your life," Ngo says.

TSA Assistant Administrator John Sammon said motorist privacy won't be invaded because taking X-rays of cars "is a fairly non-intrusive way of being able to inspect vehicles that are coming in" to an airport. At many airports, cars are currently stopped at random and searched by authorities.
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:28 PM   #415
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http://www.disinfo.com/content/story...-Then-Eat-Them

Satanists Stab Victims 666 Times, Then Eat Them
Avatar http://www.thesun.co.uk
Posted by majestic 1 day 7 hours ago View profile
Four teenagers were horrifically slain by Satanists — stabbed 666 times each and then eaten. The gang of Devil worshippers butchered their victims and roasted them on a bonfire before devouring their flesh.



Horrified cops found body parts dumped in a pit beside an upside-down cross, a symbol used in Satanic worship. The victims all suffered 666 knife wounds — the number associated with the Beast, or Antichrist, and featured in horror films such as The Omen.

The pals, three girls and a boy aged 16 or 17, were all Goths. They were lured one by one to a cottage and forced to get drunk before being butchered. Hair from them was found in the embers of a fire the gang lit under a tree.

Police believe the teenagers were cooked in the flames before their flesh
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:31 PM   #416
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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26742742/

Could inner zombie be controlling your brain?
Evidence suggests self-aware part of our brains isn't always in charge
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:33 PM   #417
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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26677884/

Pope condemns 'pagan' love of money, power
Benedict leads more than 250,000 Catholics in outdoor Mass in Paris


PARIS - Pope Benedict XVI condemned unbridled “pagan” passion for power, possessions and money as a modern-day plague Saturday as he led more than a quarter of a million Catholics in an outdoor Mass in Paris.

Benedict was making his first visit as pontiff to the French capital, renowned for its luxury goods, fashion sense and cultural riches.

“Has not our modern world created its own idols?” Benedict said in his homily, and wondered aloud whether people have “imitated, perhaps inadvertently, the pagans of antiquity?”


___

Hey pope - where's the damn collection plate? Or do you want us to ask about "god's banker" and the ties to some of the most corrupt people in the world?
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:34 PM   #418
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http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...in-wall-street

How Fractals Can Explain What's Wrong with Wall Street
The geometry that describes the shape of coastlines and the patterns of galaxies also elucidates how stock prices soar and plummet

By Benoit B. Mandelbrot
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:38 PM   #419
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'Robin Hood' bank manager stole £7m from rich clients and gave it to needy customers


A bank manager behaved like a real-life Robin Hood by taking millions of pounds from rich clients and giving it to needy customers.

Benedict Hancock, a 39-year-old father of two, channelled more than £7million into the accounts of companies in trouble.

Astonishingly, the unassuming Royal Bank of Scotland senior relationship manager did so for 'an entirely altruistic motive', Blackfriars Crown Court has heard.
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Old 09-24-2008, 08:04 AM   #420
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http://surrealdocuments.blogspot.com...bel/Possession

an interesting read and POV on "possesions".
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Old 09-24-2008, 10:30 AM   #421
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Yo when you coming up for a game? You're welcome to crash at my place, because we'll be hammered.
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Old 09-24-2008, 10:39 AM   #422
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Maybe soon... I had some **** happen - not girl **** this time - lol - car **** though.
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Old 09-26-2008, 09:10 AM   #423
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http://www.livescience.com/space/080923-dark-flows.html

Mysterious New 'Dark Flow' Discovered in Space

As if the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy weren't vexing enough, another baffling cosmic puzzle has been discovered.

Patches of matter in the universe seem to be moving at very high speeds and in a uniform direction that can't be explained by any of the known gravitational forces in the observable universe. Astronomers are calling the phenomenon "dark flow."

The stuff that's pulling this matter must be outside the observable universe, researchers conclude.

When scientists talk about the observable universe, they don't just mean as far out as the eye, or even the most powerful telescope, can see. In fact there's a fundamental limit to how much of the universe we could ever observe, no matter how advanced our visual instruments. The universe is thought to have formed about 13.7 billion years ago. So even if light started travelling toward us immediately after the Big Bang, the farthest it could ever get is 13.7 billion light-years in distance. There may be parts of the universe that are farther away (we can't know how big the whole universe is), but we can't see farther than light could travel over the entire age of the universe.

Mysterious motions

Scientists discovered the flow by studying some of the largest structures in the cosmos: giant clusters of galaxies. These clusters are conglomerations of about a thousand galaxies, as well as very hot gas which emits X-rays. By observing the interaction of the X-rays with the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which is leftover radiation from the Big Bang, scientists can study the movement of clusters.

The X-rays scatter photons in the CMB, shifting its temperature in an effect known as the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. This effect had not been observed as a result of galaxy clusters before, but a team of researchers led by Alexander Kashlinsky, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., found it when they studied a huge catalogue of 700 clusters, reaching out up to 6 billion light-years, or half the universe away. They compared this catalogue to the map of the CMB taken by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite.

They discovered that the clusters were moving nearly 2 million mph (3.2 million kph) toward a region in the sky between the constellations of Centaurus and Vela. This motion is different from the outward expansion of the universe (which is accelerated by the force called dark energy).

"We found a very significant velocity, and furthermore, this velocity does not decrease with distance, as far as we can measure," Kashlinsky told SPACE.com. "The matter in the observable universe just cannot produce the flow we measure."

Inflationary bubble

The scientists deduced that whatever is driving the movements of the clusters must lie beyond the known universe.

A theory called inflation posits that the universe we see is just a small bubble of space-time that got rapidly expanded after the Big Bang. There could be other parts of the cosmos beyond this bubble that we cannot see.

In these regions, space-time might be very different, and likely doesn't contain stars and galaxies (which only formed because of the particular density pattern of mass in our bubble). It could include giant, massive structures much larger than anything in our own observable universe. These structures are what researchers suspect are tugging on the galaxy clusters, causing the dark flow.

"The structures responsible for this motion have been pushed so far away by inflation, I would guesstimate they may be hundreds of billions of light years away, that we cannot see even with the deepest telescopes because the light emitted there could not have reached us in the age of the universe," Kashlinsky said in a telephone interview. "Most likely to create such a coherent flow they would have to be some very strange structures, maybe some warped space time. But this is just pure speculation."

Surprising find

Though inflation theory forecasts many odd facets of the distant universe, not many scientists predicted the dark flow.

"It was greatly surprising to us and I suspect to everyone else," Kashlinsky said. "For some particular models of inflation you would expect these kinds of structures, and there were some suggestions in the literature that were not taken seriously I think until now."

The discovery could help scientists probe what happened to the universe before inflation, and what's going on in those inaccessible realms we cannot see.

The researchers detail their findings in the Oct. 20 issue of the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters.
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Old 09-26-2008, 09:14 AM   #424
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http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...-to-the-blind/

In a promising result for gene therapy, researchers have dramatically improved the vision of several patients with a rare, inherited eye condition called Leber congenital amaurosis. The early study was intended to simply test the safety of the treatment, but the patients displayed such significant improvement that researchers decided to publicize the results.

Gene therapy works on a simple principle - to replace a malfunctioning gene, and restore function to a part of the body affected by a genetic disorder. In practice, however, it has proved very difficult to find ways to introduce the new gene copies in the correct tissues, and experiments in animals have had mixed results [BBC News].

In the new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [subscription required], researchers selected three patients who possessed defective versions of the RPE65 gene, which normally produces an enzyme that maintains a protective layer of cells underlying light- and color-detecting photoreceptor cells. Cideciyan’s team used a virus to introduce healthy versions of the gene into their patients’ eyes, stimulating enzyme production allowing the remaining photoreceptors to function normally. Improvement began in just over a week, and remained after 90 days — the study’s endpoint [Wired News].

While only 3,000 people in the United States have Leber congenital amaurosis, researchers say that gene therapy could be used to treat other inherited eye conditions, including some forms of macular degeneration. Says ophthalmologist Stephen Rose: “We may be able to prevent blindness in children and restore functional vision in adults who have been blind for many years” [WebMD].

Earlier safety studies of the technique hinted at the impressive results to come; read about them in the Discoblog post, “Can Gene Therapy Cure the Blind?”
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Old 09-26-2008, 09:39 AM   #425
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amesj523 View Post
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...-to-the-blind/

In a promising result for gene therapy, researchers have dramatically improved the vision of several patients with a rare, inherited eye condition called Leber congenital amaurosis. The early study was intended to simply test the safety of the treatment, but the patients displayed such significant improvement that researchers decided to publicize the results.

Gene therapy works on a simple principle - to replace a malfunctioning gene, and restore function to a part of the body affected by a genetic disorder. In practice, however, it has proved very difficult to find ways to introduce the new gene copies in the correct tissues, and experiments in animals have had mixed results [BBC News].

In the new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [subscription required], researchers selected three patients who possessed defective versions of the RPE65 gene, which normally produces an enzyme that maintains a protective layer of cells underlying light- and color-detecting photoreceptor cells. Cideciyan’s team used a virus to introduce healthy versions of the gene into their patients’ eyes, stimulating enzyme production allowing the remaining photoreceptors to function normally. Improvement began in just over a week, and remained after 90 days — the study’s endpoint [Wired News].

While only 3,000 people in the United States have Leber congenital amaurosis, researchers say that gene therapy could be used to treat other inherited eye conditions, including some forms of macular degeneration. Says ophthalmologist Stephen Rose: “We may be able to prevent blindness in children and restore functional vision in adults who have been blind for many years” [WebMD].

Earlier safety studies of the technique hinted at the impressive results to come; read about them in the Discoblog post, “Can Gene Therapy Cure the Blind?”
This one is absolutely awesome, dude. Keep up the good work of finding all this!
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