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Old 10-05-2007, 11:31 PM   #76
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Bernier gets the start tommorow vs the Blues.

Crawford on Bernier per Hammonds Blog-
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`Anything that's been thrown at him here, whether it's been media notoriety or outings we've had for the team whether in Europe or here, it's had a high-profile professional aura to it. A lot of times, you see young players be in awe of that. He's not in awe. He's respectful and he's just enjoying it. It's hard to put a finger on exactly what it is, but he's got it. He's handled it really well. He's got a great ability to keep himself centered, and I think that's how he plays too. He's got an economy of movement, a real strong foundation to his game and he's anchored to the middle of that net really well.''

``We're trying to help him as much as we can, giving him as much information, staying pretty close to him on his work habits in practice, his recovery after practice, even to the point of his eating habits and sleeping habits. We're doing our due diligence too to make sure a young player isn't missing something along the way.''

http://www.insidesocal.com/kings/
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Old 10-05-2007, 11:37 PM   #77
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Caps open the season with a win, 3-1. Newcomers Kozlov and Nylander get goals, with Backstrom getting his first career point.
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Old 10-06-2007, 01:01 PM   #78
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Default Drury, Briere have strong debuts

Chris Drury and Daniel Briere had strong debuts with their new teams, and Chris Mason and Niklas Backstrom were perfect in their first games as starting goalies.

Drury's first goal in a Rangers uniform snapped a third-period tie and sparked a late outburst that carried New York to a 5-2 victory over the Florida Panthers on Thursday night.

Drury, signed this summer after helping Buffalo eliminate the Rangers in the second round of the playoffs, put in a rebound of Jaromir Jagr's shot 8:46 into the third period to give New York a 3-2 lead and spark an outburst of three goals in a little more than four minutes. It was Drury's 38th winning goal in the regular season, and 53rd counting the playoffs.

"Same answer I always give: right place at the right time," Drury said.

Drury's former Sabres teammate Briere scored his first two goals for Philadelphia to help the Flyers beat Calgary 3-2, spoiling Mike Keenan's coaching debut with the Flames. Briere connected on the game-winner with 1:48 left.

"It was pretty cool, but it's not just about me," Briere said. "It's about the team, but there's no doubt that personally it feels great to help your team and doing your part for a big win like tonight."

Mason, given Nashville's No. 1 goaltending spot after Tomas Vokoun was traded to Florida in the offseason, made 35 saves for his ninth career shutout in the Predators' 4-0 victory over Colorado.
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"I really wanted to make a statement and hopefully I did that," Mason said. "Getting a shutout was as good as I could have hoped for. But this is only one game. I want to show everyone that I can do this throughout the season."

Backstrom stopped 27 shots in Minnesota's 1-0 win over Chicago for his sixth career shutout.

In other NHL games Thursday night, it was: Ottawa 3, Toronto 2; Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 1; Phoenix 3, St. Louis 2; and Edmonton 3, San Jose 2 in a shootout.

In New York, Petr Prucha, Ryan Callahan and Martin Straka also scored in the third period as the Rangers turned a 2-1 deficit into a rousing victory. Marek Malik assisted on three of the final-period tallies, and Jagr and Drury finished with two assists apiece. Michal Rozsival also scored for the Rangers.

Brett McLean and Nathan Horton scored second-period goals for the Panthers. Vokoun made 20 saves in his Florida debut, and Henrik Lundqvist stopped 27 shots for the Rangers.

At Calgary, Alberta, Mike Knuble and Briere scored in the first period to give the Flyers a 2-0 lead. The Flames tied the game on a pair of goals from Daymond Langkow.

"It's a tough way to lose but we have to look at ourselves and know that we can't spot teams a lead like that and have a start like that," Flames captain Jarome Iginla said.

Martin Biron made 24 saves for the Flyers while Miikka Kiprusoff made 23 saves for the Flames.

At Nashville, Tenn., the line of Jason Arnott, J.P Dumont and Vernon Fiddler accounted for three goals and three assists for the Predators. Arnott had two goals and an assist, Dumont had a goal and an assist and Fiddler added one assist.

"We got a few things rolling in preseason and it has carried over into the regular season," Arnott said. "I played with J.P last year so I move extremely well with him. Fiddler is the new guy and works so hard out there. A lot of people don't know how skilled he is."

Tyler Weiman scored Nashville's fourth goal.

At St. Paul, Minn., Pierre-Marc Bouchard scored the only goal in support of Backstrom, who was given a two-year, $6.2 million contract in June that led the team to deal Manny Fernandez to Boston.

In his first game under the burden of the big money and the starting job, Backstrom was just as sharp and calm as when he was a 29-year-old rookie who helped the Wild make the playoffs for the second time in franchise history. He didn't give up many rebounds and didn't budge when the Blackhawks had a brief 5-on-3 midway through the second period.

"It's easier when you don't have to think too much," Backstrom said.

Chicago's Nikolai Khabibulin stopped 23 shots.

Daniel Alfredsson's scored twice, including the game-winner on a power play with 4:59 remaining, to lift host Ottawa.

Dany Heatley also scored for the Senators, and Mats Sundin and Matt Stajan scored goals 32 seconds apart in the second period for Toronto.

Vincent Lecavalier scored twice, including a tiebreaking goal with 3:52 left in the third, spoiling Brent Sutter's debut as visiting New Jersey's coach.

Vinny Prospal had an empty-netter with 58 seconds left for the Lightning, Martin St. Louis had three assists and Johan Holmqvist stopped 26 shots.

Brian Gionta scored for the Devils and Martin Brodeur made 21 saves.

Jarret Stoll scored in the shootout for host Edmonton after San Jose's Joe Thornton scored the tying goal on a power play with 11 seconds left in regulation.

Tom Gilbert and Kyle Brodziak scored in regulation for the Oilers, and Patrick Marleau had San Jose's other goal.

Rookie Daniel Winnik's first NHL goal, at 7:30 of the third period, stretched host Phoenix's lead to 3-0 and stood as the game-winner.

Keith Tkachuk and Brad Boyce scored late in the third to pull the Blues to 3-2, but the Coyotes hung on.

Keith Ballard and Mike York also scored for Phoenix.
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Old 10-06-2007, 01:17 PM   #79
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Default Garry Bettman mentions ESPN

Hmmmm they didn't have our back through the lockout and dropped the NHL like a turd and you give yet another shot that they don't deserve.

http://www.ajc.com/sports/content/sp...sbiz_1007.html

Q: What do you see ahead as far as TV deals?

A: We have great partnerships with NBC and [cable network] Versus. ... There have been reports that ESPN is interested in us. ... I do believe our current partners will be in the picture long-term. Whether or not there is an opportunity to have another partner is something we’re always open to looking at.
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Old 10-06-2007, 02:54 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronx33 View Post
Hmmmm they didn't have our back through the lockout and dropped the NHL like a turd and you give yet another shot that they don't deserve.
It's all about marketing baby! ESPN would give the NHL the coverage it needs. Doesn't need to televise the majority of the games, but at least televise some of the games. I mean do you remember the coverage they would put on the Avalanche and Red Wings games? They couldn't get enough of that series. Besides I am a little biased, we need more Barry Melrose!
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Old 10-07-2007, 08:36 PM   #81
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Joe sakic just moved past bobby hull and phil Esposito with a goal and an asst for a total of 1,591 vs the sharks.

Last edited by Bronx33; 10-08-2007 at 12:31 AM..
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:41 PM   #82
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Default Paul Stastny Q and A

Q. It’s always hard to predict how a young player coming out of U.S. college makes the adjustment to the NHL. Some take a long time and some take a very short period of time. Can you pinpoint why there doesn’t seem to have been the steep learning curve that some young players have had, why it seems to have gone so relatively smoothly for you?

PAUL STASTNY: I don’t know if it was quick. But I was in college for two years. And so when I came up, I was already 20, 21. Pretty mature for my age, and it was easier for me, maybe because I was a little smarter. Some of the things you can’t teach I got from my dad. Playing with better players I think makes it a lot easier for me, just knowing that you can give and go. They think the way I do and it makes it that much easier.

Q. Last year, during the spring, the Niedermayer brothers talked about how much they enjoyed playing together and winning the Stanley Cup together, and both your father and uncles had a chance to play with each other. Do you speak to your brother about that in your hockey playing lives, to play together and have a chance to win a Stanley Cup together?

PAUL STASTNY: We talked about that growing up. I think we’re both trying to battle for jobs in the NHL and hopefully one day if we’re both fortunate our paths might cross. I think the two happiest people would be our parents besides me and my brother. But that’s the only thing we’ve talked about. Can’t really predict or look forward to that because you never know if it’s going to happen.

Q. You’re playing for basically the same franchise that your father played for. Do you have any memories of Quebec and when you were growing up?

PAUL STASTNY: Yeah, not too much. Not hockey specifically. I remember growing up, the cold winters and playing on the ponds right across the street from where we lived, going to the rink, just me and my brother. Obviously it was fond memories. Then when I went back there for the Quebec Peewee tournament, it really showed up. My dad was there.

Q. Do you remember how old you were when you started to realize what hockey legends your dad and uncles were, any stories that stick out? And can you describe growing up in St. Louis with your brother and how competitive you were with each other?

PAUL STASTNY: As I got older, I think just from hearing from other people, obviously my dad and uncle are two humble guys. Just from hearing from other people how respected of a player my dad and uncles were, how good of players they were.

As you get older you start reading stuff and seeing more highlights. I was probably 15, 16, right around there, when hockey started getting serious. Growing up in St. Louis, I think it’s changed from the moment ? from day one from when I’ve been there the last 12, 13 years hockey has been growing big. Me and my brother have been best friends and working out and doing everything side by side for the last seven, eight summers. One big reason I’m here is we compete against each other and we’re always trying to do what we can to help each other out.

Q. I think there’s a sense around the league that last few guys have scored a lot of goals, but this year you might be more dynamic. Is there a sense around the team that you’re the sort of team that is capable where no lead will be safe, that you have the ability to get four goals a game?

PAUL STASTNY: I think we’re just ? we can’t think like that, because when we do that’s when we end up getting in trouble, we’re playing the high and taking too many chances. We’re focused on playing defense. And like you said, with the players we’ve added offensively, we know we can score. If we’re playing a tight game or open up game, I think we’re comfortable playing both ways.

Q. How has the attitude in the dressing room changed from last year to this year? Is there a sense that this team has all the tools necessary to make a real serious run at the Cup?

PAUL STASTNY: I don’t know. I think it’s a lot similar to the way it ended last year with the run we went on. And it’s a loose atmosphere. And obviously it’s well ran by the coaches down to our captains leading the way.

Obviously we’re having fun out there, and we’re working hard. But I think when it comes game?wise we’re just trying to focus one game at a time instead of looking forward to halfway down the year or next couple of games. I think we’re taking it one at a time. We put ourselves in a better position once the season rolls around.

Q. Playing in the WCHA, what did that do to prepare you for the National Hockey League and playing now with the Avalanche?

PAUL STASTNY: I think WCHA was really good for me, big stepping stone to where I am now. Just obviously it shows ? obviously when I was there it was top?end competition all around, from the first place team to the 10th place team. It’s starting to show more and more now with more guys leaving school early. And I think it’s getting the respect that maybe it finally deserves.

Q. On that team you’ve got a future Hall of Famer in Joe Sakic, can you talk about what kind of a mentor he’s been to you, if in any way he has been?

PAUL STASTNY: Yeah, I think he’s been good. He’s a quiet guy. I think once you get to know him he opens up. If I ever needed little questions, small questions answered, he’s always there to help me.

Obviously he’s making sure I’m having fun out there, always saying little jokes about my old man when they played together. But I think it’s more of you just watch the way he presents himself the way he is on and off the ice and you learn more from that than just asking him questions.

Q. You were born in Quebec, raised in St. Louis. There was a story that was making the rounds in the spring that because you hadn’t plate internationally for either Canada or U.S. you were sort of an international free agent, and then ultimately opted to play for the U.S. So I guess my question is, one, was that true that you had a choice? And, two, if so, why did you decide to play for the Americans?

PAUL STASTNY: I could play either one so I didn’t play many IHF competitions. But I think I had maybe a better opportunity or I think the U.S. wanted me and maybe looking to the future, my brother already played for the U.S. So like you said it’s always a dream of ours to play together and maybe one day we’ll play together in an international event like that. But obviously they gave me an opportunity and you can never turn that down.

Q. Can you talk about how intense it was as you approached the streak last year, the record?

PAUL STASTNY: (Chuckling) it wasn’t too bad until I got to 13, 14 games. And then I didn’t even think about it then I started hearing about it all the time.

I think it wasn’t something I was worried about, just because we kept winning it made it that much easier. Obviously when your team is winning and you’re having fun, I think everything was rolling smoothly there. Obviously no one on my team or in this organization gave me added pressure. So I think it was something that was maybe a little easier said than it actually appeared.

Q. Obviously you had all summer to think about how your sophomore season would get kicked off. It’s been a great start for you. Can you talk about how good it feels to pick up where you left off?

PAUL STASTNY: It’s always good to know you get a good start to the season. Always in the past I’ve been a slow starter, but obviously you adapt and you learn ? I learned a lot last year, and I train a lot harder this summer thinking this year would be a lot harder than last year. Not everyone knows you. You can’t get away with little things anymore. I think I prepared myself pretty well this summer.
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:44 PM   #83
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Default Jason Blake announced on Monday that he has Leukemia,

http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story/?ID=220161&hubname

"This morning I shared with my teammates news that I was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia," Blake said on the team's website.

"It is highly-treatable, and I have begun taking a pill on a daily basis that has proven to be very effective in controlling this cancer. The prognosis, and certainly the expectations of my physician, myself and my family, is that I will live a long, full and normal life. This situation will not impact my ability to live my life as I otherwise would, and will not affect my ability to perform at my highest level for the Toronto Maple Leafs. I'm looking forward to my first season with the Leafs and helping our club compete for the Stanley Cup."

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells.
Related Info

* Blake's Off-Ice Battle
* Blake's Challenges
* July 1: Leafs sign Blake to five-year deal

It's considered chronic leukemia because it usually progresses more slowly than acute leukemia, sometimes over the course of years.



CML is not a solid tumor that can be surgically removed, but the prognosis for people with chronic myelogenous leukemia may be improving because of new medications to treat the condition.

"When you find out that you have something it's definitely shattering to your whole family and so on," Blake said after practice.

"Overall I feel good. I'm still here and my goal this whole season hasn't changed. Obviously you take a step back and you kind of re-evaluate everything but for the most part I feel good. I think to get it off my chest and to move forward is a big weight lifted."

Although a bone marrow transplant may still be an option, many people with chronic myelogenous leukemia are able to manage their condition long term with the use of chemotherapy-like pills.

The team added after Monday's practice that they will be mindful of his condition.

"Jason will be able to continue to play fully with the team and will be monitored closely by both the team's physician and his CML specialist," team doctor Noah Forman said.

It's the second time that Blake's family has been affected by cancer.

In March of 2001, Blake's wife, Sara - eight months pregnant with their first child - was told by doctors that she had thyroid cancer. Blake left the team to be with her, and Lauren Blake was born March 20 after Sara underwent an emergency Caesarean section.

Sara had a portion of her thyroid removed without complications shortly afterwards, and the lump that was removed was determined not to be cancerous.

Toronto signed Jason Blake to a $20 million, five-year contract on July 1.

The four-time 20-goal scorer finished with career highs in goals and points (69) while playing all 82 games with the New York Islanders last season.
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Old 10-09-2007, 10:46 PM   #84
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Boooing during a moment of silence for bill Wirtz..

Classy chicago
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Old 10-09-2007, 11:04 PM   #85
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10 rookies to keep an eyeball on this year...

1) Andrew Cogliano, Edmonton, C. —The 25th pick overall in the 2005 draft, Cogliano played college hockey last season at Michigan, and picked up 28 points in 39 games. He is a bit small (5-10/185), but his speed and skill level, combined with the Oil's dire need for offense, won him a roster spot. He led all rookies in scoring (1-2--3) through the first weekend.

2) Erik Johnson, St. Louis, D. — The Bloomington (MN)-born backliner, picked No. 1 overall in '06, came to camp a shoo-in after two seasons with the US Development Team program. He is big (6-feet-4/220) and considered a potential franchise-defenseman (in the way folks talked about Ray Bourque and Chris Pronger at the same age). He can hit. He can shoot. Perhaps just the cornerstone the Blues need to rebuild the franchise.

3) Andrew Greene, New Jersey, D — Never a top college prospect in college (Miami, O), Green signed as a free agent in April 2006 and made his NHL debut last season, but still qualifies as a rookie. Though weekend No. 1, he led all rookies in average ice time (21:55) and in shots (8). A mobile puckhanlder, just what the Devs need in the wake of Brian Rafalski leaving as a free agent to Detroit.

4) Sam Gagner, Edmonton, C — Another Oiler on the rise, like Cogliano. Picked No. 6 overall in this June's draft, the son of former NHLer Dave Gagner. Excellent stick skills, he collected 83 points in 53 games last season with the London Knights (OHL), and at only age 18, figured to be headed back there this season. He picked up two assists in his first three games, and averaged 10:30 ice time. Looks like he's going nowhere but the Oil's dressing room.


5) Nicklas Backstrom, Washington, C — Much hype proceeded the Swedish born pivot, who was the No. 4 overall pick in the '06 draft. He has added about 20 pounds (now 6-0/203) since his draft day, and looks as though he will live up to the advanced billing. A slick puckhandler and distributor, he had only one shot in is first three games (0-2--2). If he ends up skating fulltime with Alexander Ovechkin, he'll know where to pass that puck.

6) Patrick Kane, Chicago, RW — He collected 145 points in only 58 games last season in London, where he was one of Gagner's teammates, and that led him to being picked No. 1 overall in the June draft. He went only 0-1--1 in his first two games wearing the Indian Head, but he popped home an OT shootout winner against the Wings, who had his boyhood idol, Dominik Hasek, in net. Buffalo born and raised, he was only 5-10/163 when selected, and will need to add some size and muscle — but he has a skill set similar to that of Sidney Crosby.

7) Jonathan Toews, Chicago, C — As noted above, injury delayed his debut, but the Winnipeg-born pivot should be a factor when he gets his game going. He picked up 39 points in 42 college games (No. Dakota) last season, and has the size (6-2/205), reach and legs to be a franchise centerman. Hawks fans imagine the magic that could come if he pairs up long term with Kane.

8) Carey Price, Montreal, G — GM Bob Gainey prevailed over coach Guy Carbonneau when it came time to decide whether Price remained with Habs or tutored in the minors for a while. Expectations are sky high for the 20-year-old, which was Carbonneau's concern. However, Price, selected No. 5 overall in the '05 draft, has been fulfilling similar expectations for years. He was last season's Canadian Major Junior goalie of the year, and is now 6-3/225. Yes, Dryden-like, if you are comparing.



9) Milan Lucic, Boston, LW — The MVP of the Memorial Cup with the Vancouver Giants, Lucic is a bruising winger who loves to bang and fight (always valued in the Boston market). His skating is challenged, which is why he dropped to 50th in the 2006 draft, but he impressed through camp and didn't disappoint in his first two NHL games. No guarantee that he will stick in Boston all season, but if he stays, he could keep surprising people — a lot of people.

10) Dan Carcillo, Phoenix, LW — If you are a little rusty in language skills, I think ''Carcillo'' is Italian for ''total pest''. Not sure, but it must be true after watching the 22-year-old agitator, who came to the Coyotes via last season's deal that sent pugilist Georges Laracque to Pittsburgh. Carcillo is in the Sean Avery-Darcy Tucker mold — one of those guys you only like if he's on your team.
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Old 10-10-2007, 05:16 PM   #86
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Default Debating Kid Rock

Why?

News that Kid Rock was given a Stanley Cup ring by Carolina Hurricanes owner Pete Karmanos, a fellow Detroit native, set off some discussion in the hockey world today.

On The Fan 590 in Toronto, John Garrett was appalled and rightly so that some pop star would get an exact replica of the ring given to the players when they won the 2006 Cup just because he’s a buddy of the owner. The Sportsnet commentator said his daughter got a ring when she was a staffer for the Tampa Bay Lightning when they won in 2004, but it was a much simpler model than the one given to the players.

“You think of all the former players and the sweat they put in trying to win a ring,” Garrett said. “The ring has to stand for something.”

After the Leafs finished practising, someone asked head coach Paul Maurice if he thought he should get a ring from Karmanos if Kid Rock deserved one. After all, Maurice was the long-time coach of the Hurricanes, starting out as coach of Karmanos’s Detroit Junior Red Wings.

Maurice is still a close friend of ‘Canes GM Jim Rutherford and he left the team on relatively good terms despite being fired in partway through the 2003-04 season.

“Are you serious?” Maurice asked his questioner. No, it wasn’t me, it was Steve Simmons from the Toronto Sun. Put Maurice down with Garrett.

“Wow, that’s the toughest question I’ve had since I’ve been here and the answer is no,” he said.

XXXXXX

Defenceman Carlo Colaiacovo and centre Kyle Wellwood skated by themselves before yesterday’s Leaf practice. It was their first appearance on the ice since they were forced out with recovery problems from, respectively, knee surgery and sports hernia surgery.

But don’t expect them back any time soon to help their beleaguered temmates.

Maurice says Coloaiacovo reports his knee feels great but he could not say when he can start practicing at full speed with his teammates. Wellwood is even further away.

Don’t be surprised if Mark Bell, who can return from his 15-game NHL suspension on Nov. 6, is back in uniform before at least one of them.

Last edited by Bronx33; 10-10-2007 at 05:18 PM..
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Old 10-10-2007, 05:35 PM   #87
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Default Bertuzzi questionable

Well that didn't take long.....

DILLHOLE

Ducks winger Todd Bertuzzi is questionable for tonight's home opener against Boston because of a strained groin suffered in last week's loss to Columbus.

Bertuzzi said the groin continued to bother him Saturday night in Pittsburgh, which was probably the reason he logged only 14:04 of ice time and was largely ineffective.

"Like anyone else with a groin injury, it limits your strength and your skating," said Bertuzzi, who has a goal and an assist in five games. "Just came to a point where I couldn't go anymore."

Bertuzzi did not skate Tuesday, but he said he felt better. The original problem, he said, came in London, where he tweaked his knee and then hurt his groin while compensating for the knee.

"I'm going to come here hoping to play," he said. "I'll skate in the morning and see how it goes from there."

Bertuzzi, who has had back surgery and also suffered a cracked tailbone in the Western Conference finals while with Detroit, said this is the first time he has had a groin problem.

"I'm finding new injuries that I've never had before," he joked.

Center Andy McDonald returned to practice Tuesday after being with his wife, Gina, who delivered the couple's first child on Monday. Jake Gene McDonald checked in at 7 pounds, 5 ounces. . . . The Ducks sent center Ryan Carter to the Portland Pirates
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Old 10-10-2007, 05:45 PM   #88
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Default Burnside ranks NHL coaches

ESPN

1. Randy Carlyle, Anaheim Ducks
Let's see. Two years as an NHL coach, one surprise trip to the Western Conference finals, one Stanley Cup championship. Any questions?


2. Lindy Ruff, Buffalo Sabres
Two years in a row Ruff has taken his Buffalo Sabres to the Eastern Conference finals. He'll have his hands full this season, but if anyone can get Buffalo over the hump after losing co-captains Chris Drury and Daniel Briere, it's Ruff.

3. Peter Laviolette, Carolina Hurricanes
The guy won a Stanley Cup two seasons ago playing a wildly exciting brand of hockey. He still gets top billing even if his squad fell off and out of the playoffs in 2006-07.

4. Michel Therrien, Pittsburgh Penguins
Tough as nails, Therrien defied critics who thought he wouldn't last a season under new GM Ray Shero by deftly handling youngsters Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and especially rookie of the year candidate Jordan Staal. Now, he's got to prove he's the real deal by taking them far in the playoffs.

5. Alain Vigneault, Vancouver Canucks
We still don't know how Vigneault, the former Montreal Canadiens coach, managed to coax his team to the top of the Northwest Division and through the first round of the playoffs. The test is now to get them back.

6. Mike Babcock, Detroit Red Wings
The pressure was on Babcock and the Red Wings last season and he managed to get a much grittier effort out of his talented squad than many thought possible. If not for a bad bounce or two, they would have beaten the Ducks in the Western Conference finals. They should be back to the conference finals again.

7. Tom Renney, New York Rangers
Renney has done a splendid job with the Rangers, first getting them into the playoffs in 2005-06 when no one thought it was possible, and then following that with a trip to the second round and a tough series loss to Buffalo. He's also done a masterful job of getting enigmatic star Jaromir Jagr to buy in.

8. Ron Wilson, San Jose Sharks
Lofty playoff expectations haven't been met by the Sharks, but Wilson has seen his squad win at least one playoff round the last three postseasons.

9. John Tortorella, Tampa Bay Lightning
Two first-round exits since the end of the lockout, but Tortorella's Lightning made the playoffs in four straight seasons and won a Stanley Cup in 2004.

10. Andy Murray, St. Louis Blues
Murray, a stickler for details, wore out his welcome in Los Angeles, but he turned things around in record time in St. Louis last season. Now the challenge is to keep the Blues on track and guide them back to the postseason.

11. Jacques Lemaire, Minnesota Wild
Is Lemaire getting more than he should out of a Wild team that has yet to win a playoff round since 2003, or is he holding them back? Discuss among yourselves.

12. Ted Nolan, New York Islanders Guess Nolan really can coach after all. The former coach of the year gets blacklisted from the NHL for a decade, and then takes a bunch of underachievers and malcontents to the playoffs.

13. Ken Hitchcock, Columbus Blue Jackets
Hitchcock doesn't have much to work with yet in Columbus and his Flyers did struggle mightily out of the gate a season ago, which ultimately cost him his job. But Hitchcock is still one of the game's great coaching minds.

Andy Murray

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Andy Murray starts his first full season behind the bench with the St. Louis Blues.

14. Jacques Martin, Florida Panthers
Martin guided the Ottawa Senators to the playoffs for eight straight seasons, but his reputation is now on the line in Florida, where the pressure is on to make something out of a pile of young talent.

15. Craig MacTavish, Edmonton Oilers
Surely it wasn't a fluke that the eighth-seeded Edmonton Oilers advanced to the seventh game of the 2006 Stanley Cup finals. Or was it? This season will go a long way in answering that question.

16. Joel Quenneville, Colorado Avalanche
Quenneville's teams have never quite got over the hump. He'll get a chance to prove he can change that trend this season with a much-improved Avalanche team.

17. Dave Tippett, Dallas Stars
If you just considered Tippett's regular-season record, he'd be a top-10 coach every year. Unfortunately, the Stars' recent history of bowing out in the first round of the playoffs is what fans remember most about Tippett's teams in Dallas.

18. Barry Trotz, Nashville Predators
The same can be said for Trotz, who has evolved along with his team in Nashville. But three straight first-round playoff exits, followed by a denuding of the Preds' lineup thanks to its ownership situation, puts Trotz in an unenviable position.

19. Bob Hartley, Atlanta Thrashers
Seems like a long time ago when Hartley and his Colorado Avalanche were hoisting the Stanley Cup in June 2001. After getting swept in the first round last spring, the pressure is on Hartley to get the Thrashers deep into the postseason. He remains hamstrung by poor drafting and development in Atlanta.

20. Glen Hanlon, Washington Capitals
Hanlon hasn't had much to work with in Washington, but he's instilled an impressive work ethic in his troops. Now, he's got some more tools and it will be interesting to see how much more Hanlon can get out of his new-look Caps.

21. Paul Maurice, Toronto Maple Leafs
The cerebral and even-keeled Maurice failed in his first bid to get the Toronto Maple Leafs into the postseason. Chances are this will be his last chance in the center of the hockey universe.

22. Guy Carbonneau, Montreal Canadiens
Carbonneau couldn't get along with Sergei Samsonov, and there were reports, courtesy of Alexei Kovalev and the Russian media, that there are rifts within the Habs' dressing room. None of which would have mattered had the Canadiens made the playoffs. But they didn't, and aren't likely to again this season.

23. Claude Julien, Boston Bruins
Whether he was treated unfairly in Montreal or New Jersey or not is now moot. Julien will have to turn around the Bruins ship or this could be the end of the line for him as an NHL head coach.

24. Marc Crawford, Los Angeles Kings
It seems like it was long ago when Crawford was on top of the coaching world, winning the Stanley Cup with Colorado in 1996 and then coaching the Canadian Olympic team two years later in Nagano. Expectations are high for the Los Angeles Kings to show dramatic improvement. Can Crawford guide them to the postseason?

25. Denis Savard, Chicago Blackhawks
GM Dale Tallon thinks Savard is the real deal after giving the coach a contract extension this summer. Savard's still got an uphill battle, but there is more talent in Chicago than it's seen in many years.

26. John Stevens, Philadelphia Flyers
Stevens inherited a bad hand in Philadelphia last season, but the Flyers didn't show much in the way of turnaround. Now, GM Paul Holmgren has broken the bank to get the Flyers back to the playoffs and Stevens had better not let that talent go to waste.

27. John Paddock, Ottawa Senators
Hmm, 1995 was a long time ago, but that's how long it's been since Paddock was an NHL coach. He's proven himself to be a fine, patient teacher of young players. Is he the man to take the Senators to that next step of a Stanley Cup championship? Because that's the expectation in the Canadian capital.

28. Wayne Gretzky, Phoenix Coyotes
We know, he's Wayne Gretzky. But he's also 69-85-10 in two seasons as an NHL coach. And unless Gretzky starts to channel Toe Blake this season, the Coyotes are headed for a near-basement finish once more.

29. Brent Sutter, New Jersey Devils
We know, he's a Sutter and he's like the Sidney Crosby of coaching prospects. But he never coached an NHL regular-season game before this season. Get back to us in April.

30. Mike Keenan, Calgary Flames
Sorry, until he shows he won't single-handedly destroy the Calgary Flames, "Iron Mike" gets a seat in the rankings basement.
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Old 10-11-2007, 06:26 PM   #89
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to find than verses



On Tuesday, the NHL announced that its dedicated NHL Network (which has been available to those lucky Canadians and their suddenly valuable money for some time) would be coming to US viewers “this month.” More hockey, hooray!

In the brief announcement, Commissioner Bettman said that the NHL had reached carriage agreements with Cablevision, Comcast, Cox Communications, DirecTV, Dish Network and Time Warner Cable. As a Dish Network customer, I immediately sought to find out where I could find some of that NHL Network goodness.



First stop: Dish Network website. Hmmm, nothing on the front page. Sports? Gotta be some info there. Football, check. College sports, check. Cricket, check. Hockey…ah, there it is. Well, that’s about Center Ice. I want my NHL Network, dammit!

Dish had very kindly thrown the NFL Network into my programming package at no charge; surely the same would apply to NHL Network—it’s only one letter off. On the other hand, to get VERSUS I have to subscribe to a premium package. Sadly, this left me with but one choice: calling customer service.

Dish is not as bad on this front as some other companies, but let’s face it: American corporations have very successfully made it so that calling customer service to resolve a problem is now your last choice instead of your first. Customer service lines are currently built on a series of lies and traps.

1) “Please listen carefully, as our menu options may have changed.”

No, they haven’t. They never change. Because if they did, that would mean the company gave a crap about its customer service line, which it doesn’t.

2) “For billing questions and payment information, press 1. To order pay per view movies or events, Press 2. To upgrade your subscription package, press 3. For technical support, press 4. To cause a 10,000 volt shock to be sent over the line, sparing you from suffering through the rest of this call, press 5.”

I do nothing.

“I’m sorry. I didn’t hear you make a selection. Let’s try this again.”

The electroshock option begins to tempt.

3) “All of our agents are currently busy assisting other customers. But your call is very important. Please stay on the line.”

It could be true that all the agents are busy. But that would mean that this entity of which I am a customer is either too stupid to properly staff, or has way too many problems. Neither of which is confidence-inspiring. So this must be a lie. The computer deliberately holds calls in limbo for (at least) five minutes, hoping this will weed out the time-crunched and weak-willed. I bet it works.

4) “Thanks to you for calling Dish Network. My name is Eddie. How may I be helping you?”

Now, from his accented English and stilted grammar, it’s pretty clear that “Eddie” is from India, or possibly Bangladesh. I lose track of the hottest outsourcing trends. But his name almost certainly is not Eddie. It is Jagadeesh, or Jawarhalal, or Manmohan. He knows he’s Indian; I know he’s Indian; why are we pretending that he’s Eddie from Cedar Rapids? I don’t care where he’s from—he’s trying to make a rupee just like the rest of us—I just want him to answer my question.

5) “I am sorry sir, I am not understanding your question.”

It’s possible this is actually my fault—I get a little excited just thinking about the NHL Network. I slow down and explain that I am interested in receiving the NHL Network, a channel dedicated exclusively to hockey.

6) “Hoc-key?”

Ha-ha. That one’s a killer every time, “Eddie”! Oh. Turns out he was genuinely confused. Not so many rinks in Bangalore, apparently.

Several minutes of Eddie searching through the computer brings no results—no such network is part of any programming package they offer. Apparently, word of the carriage agreement has yet to trickle down to the people with whom one might actually place an order for NHL Network.

Well, I was thinking of switching to DirecTV anyway. May as well try them.

“Thanks to you for calling DirecTV. My name is Eddie. How may I be helping you?”

I have a feeling this isn’t going to go well…
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Old 10-12-2007, 04:07 PM   #90
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JordanTootoo cheapshot

Jordin Tootoo of the Nasvhille Predators takes a run at Phoenix rookie Daniel Winnik – and it says here Tootoo was targeting Winnik’s head – and it’s Coyote rookie Craig Weller who gets the match penalty for intent to injure on the play, because Weller clotheslined Tootoo after the hit....

But it’s the Tootoo hit that should be the real concern.

If ever there were a hit where it looked like a player was intentionally trying to hit someone in the head, this was it.
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Old 10-12-2007, 04:13 PM   #91
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JordanTootoo cheapshot
If ever there were a hit where it looked like a player was intentionally trying to hit someone in the head, this was it.
i agree 100%

i posted this up in the flyers thread just cuz i didnt wanna whine about it in this one, but i certainly think that if downie got 20 then this should too, the result was different but the intent was the same, at least downie broke stride tho when he launched into him, tootooo didnt.

i guess we get a quick chance to see how consistant the nhl is going to be about head shots.

or does this one get swept under the rug because it didnt happen to a senaturd, and the canadian media seems to be ignoring it, unlike the downie incident .
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Old 10-12-2007, 04:18 PM   #92
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The league has it's hands full lately that's for sure it should be interesting what comes out of this rash of examples.
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Old 10-12-2007, 04:42 PM   #93
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Suspension

Philadelphia forward Jesse Boulerice was suspended 25 games by the NHL on Friday for cross-checking Vancouver’s Ryan Kesler across the face, matching the largest suspension in league history.
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Old 10-12-2007, 05:02 PM   #94
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Funny nucks fans...

http://vancouver.craigslist.org/tix/447146765.html
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Old 10-12-2007, 07:53 PM   #95
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Suspension

Philadelphia forward Jesse Boulerice was suspended 25 games by the NHL on Friday for cross-checking Vancouver’s Ryan Kesler across the face, matching the largest suspension in league history.
good, i have no problem with this suspension, anybody that uses a stick as a wweapon should get the same.

Last edited by Bronx33; 10-12-2007 at 08:02 PM..
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:03 PM   #96
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He will lose roughly 144k....
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:16 PM   #97
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He will lose roughly 144k....
itll cost him more the that, id put money on the fact that his career is over, with the flyers already having downie taking up a roster sport and counting against the cap, there is no way they keep him, and since hes getting up there in age with no real upside to him id be really surprised to see anybody else pick him up. If the ahl honours the nhl suspension then he wont be able to play there either, so as i said his days doone i think.

broad street bullies 2

i love it, after getting pushed around the last 2 years the flyers are finally standing up for each other, i do however wonder how long until brierre spears somebody and gets 20 games.
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:32 PM   #98
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itll cost him more the that, id put money on the fact that his career is over, with the flyers already having downie taking up a roster sport and counting against the cap, there is no way they keep him, and since hes getting up there in age with no real upside to him id be really surprised to see anybody else pick him up. If the ahl honours the nhl suspension then he wont be able to play there either, so as i said his days doone i think.

broad street bullies 2

i love it, after getting pushed around the last 2 years the flyers are finally standing up for each other, i do however wonder how long until brierre spears somebody and gets 20 games.

Iam not sure downie is taking up roster space with a entry level contract...

http://www.nhlpa.com/WebStats/Player...p?OIDTeam=8359
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Old 10-13-2007, 03:28 PM   #99
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Default Q and A with Campbell re: Boulerice

Q. So often in these things we hear about repeat offender things, that each suspension thereafter is harsher. Now we’ve had two against a team in a short period of time. Is there any provision where teams can now be held responsible for their players’ actions as well?

COLIN CAMPBELL: There’s nothing formal that holds a team responsible. I guess if you really look at the issues they have to deal with, their roster situation, they have to deal with paying the player and with other aspects that come with losing two players that they’re paying. But there’s nothing formal that punishes the team for the number of players who are suspended.

Q. In your role, though, are you concerned that in such a short period of time there have been two severe incidents by the same club and have you spoken to either Paul Holmgren or Coach Stephens about it?

COLIN CAMPBELL: No, I’m not concerned. They’ve always had that image that dates back to ‘72 when they were nicknamed “The Broad Street Bullies.” If you look at the time that I’ve been associated with the National Hockey League doing this job, with discipline, I don’t recall—I think I’ve had a couple of players over that whole period with Philadelphia. I think Lindros back in the ‘90s and I think one other player, maybe. But I’ve had very few incidents with Philadelphia. So I have not had a problem with Philadelphia. And Paul Holmgren was easy to deal with and very up front and very honest, as was John Stephens, the coach.

Q. First of all, I know you don’t take the history of a player into consideration when you’re looking at suspending these guys. But both of the guys you suspended now have had problems in the OHL. When are you going to look at the player’s character coming into the NHL as a consideration how you treat them when it comes to acts of this nature?

COLIN CAMPBELL: I think that that’s an issue that we have to deal with the NHL Players’ Association, as far as blending that criteria into our criteria. Right now, as it stands, we’re only allowed to look at their record in our league and how they play and act in our league.

Q. Is this something that you have been talking about with the PA in the last little while, or is it something you’ll bring up with them in the future?

COLIN CAMPBELL: I haven’t thought about that. Maybe it’s something that the players themselves want to talk about. Obviously a lot of those players have played against these two players at some point in time in the OHL, a lot of the players in the NHL, so they know about these players. They talk to the teammates about that, their teammates have played with or against these players. So players are aware of that. I think that question would be better suited to the players.

Q. In the Kesler and Boulerice situation, they had a bit of a jousting match for at least a few minutes prior to the suffering the crosscheck. Is this a point where something that the referees have to take note the escalation and penalize them before we get to the point where someone suffers a serious injury?

COLIN CAMPBELL: We talked to our officials about that. But at some point in time how much of the game do you want the officials to officiate and to blend into how they’re going to control the game?

We can’t tell our officials constantly that you have to anticipate everything and cut it off before it happens. You hope that there’s a point where a player says this is where I draw the line, I’m not going any farther. And when they do go farther, they get a penalty. And they go farther than that, they get a suspension.

But when they take it to the point where Mr. Boulerice did, it’s well above a normal suspension. And it was well above any possible play. It wasn’t a stick that got high. It wasn’t a jousting session that escalated to something that’s suspendable under a two, four, five game situation. It was totally apart from the play during the game. It was just an incident that the puck was going north and he was going south towards Kesler.

Q. I don’t want to give the impression I’m thinking you have to be into the player’s head or the referee has to think about what the player is going to do before they actually do it; but the situation with Kesler and Boulerice, they were going at each other very hard, couple trips and slashes. If the referee notices this going on, can’t they step in and say one more thing and you’re out of the game? I mean that would precipitate them getting a crosscheck to the face, don’t you think?

COLIN CAMPBELL: I think you’re wrong. They can only police it so much. Maybe they did say something to them. Maybe they didn’t listen. We don’t know that. They could have said “Settle down, you guys.” But at some point in time I think you’re putting a little bit too much of the control of the game and blaming the referees when the blame should be in the players’ hands. They have to be in control of their actions.

Q. Absolutely. But we’re looking at a situation now where there have been so many egregious acts over the past couple of years, are players losing the respect for each other that was apparent when you were playing?

COLIN CAMPBELL: Well, again, I’m not so sure they’re losing respect. I think when you’ve got ?? when I played, I hate to say how many teams were in the league, but there was a lot less players in the league. There are 750 players. I’m sure the majority of those players respect each other. When you get a handful of five or six doing these things, I think it’s unfair to paint all the players in the light of a few players’ actions. When a few players get carried away, they lose the right to play. In this case they may lose their right to ever make it in the league.

We had a player for the New York Rangers, a defenseman ?? I’m trying to think of his name—Dale Purinton. He was suspended for 10 games and the message I gave him at the time was that you could affect your career. You had an opportunity to play. You’re a big guy and this may affect your career.

It did. He hasn’t been in the league since. If they want to put their career in jeopardy, that’s their choice. And so I wouldn’t paint 750 players in a certain light when you get three, four guys doing something over the course of two years.

Q. I want to ask you, if Kesler doesn’t get up, as it turns out, thank god he’s okay and he’s probably going to play tonight, but I know we talked about this before, all kinds of different factors when you sit down and think about this. The fact that he wasn’t that seriously hurt, are we looking at something even longer if Kesler is out for a long time?

COLIN CAMPBELL: Certainly, that’s always a factor in these situations. And call it luck, call it what you want, but in Chris Simon’s situation and in the situation with Jesse Boulerice, if they cause injury, we’re into a whole heap of problems, not only the player, but the teams in the league and our sport.

So we have to be careful. If there’s an injury two nights ago, we may be dealing with more than what we’re dealing with today. And I would have to say that Jesse is fairly fortunate that he didn’t cause injury, not only for Kesler himself, but in a lot of ways—I mean we saw what transpired with under the Bertuzzi situation when there is injury, it never stops.

So I would hope players would understand this and see what could happen and what could come of these things and they have to control themselves. In Jesse Boulerice’s situation, he’s a tough player, but you have to know your limitations and you have to know what you can do in your role.

Whether you were trying to send a message of what you were trying to do, you don’t do it that way.

Q. Could you walk us through how you came with the number of 25 games? Does it have anything to do with the suspension that was handed down earlier, seeing that was 20? How did you come to 25?

COLIN CAMPBELL: Well, the case last week was totally different in the sense that that was a body check that went bad. That was an endeavor that hockey operations undertook along with the players, coaches, managers, owners, on something that was occurring on a much too often basis, where a body check went to a point where it was causing injury, went beyond illegal.

And we had to determine what was acceptable, what wasn’t acceptable, when you threw a body check. A shoulder that came in contact with a head and how did you make that contact.

This was totally different. We examined that. We thought about that, obviously, because that’s always on our radar screen. But this was different. This wasn’t a body check that’s legal that kind of went bad or did go bad in a whole lot of ways, this was a stick that was used that was broken as it was used to another player’s face.

It was similar to the Simon incident. You don’t use your stick for swinging at players, crosschecking players. You use your stick for shooting and passing. And sometimes there’s accidental stick contact. Sometimes there’s careless stick contact, when players are jostling and things are getting heated around the net, when the goalie is pulled, and we’ve had suspensions in the past of two, four, five games, when players get careless and carried away.

This was a determined effort of a player who went in the opposite direction of the play was going. He sought out a player and without the player seeing him, he struck that player in the facial area with a crosscheck, breaking his stick.

And no different than Chris Simon using his stick to swing it in a fashion at another player’s head. In both cases we were fortunate, and they were fortunate, and obviously the player who received the stick were fortunate, there was no injury.

Q. How do you balance intent and the end result when you’re handing out discipline? Because you obviously sent a good message with what you handed out today. But you also mentioned this could have been harsher had there been more damage to Kesler.

COLIN CAMPBELL: I don’t know if there’s any balancing here. I think we look at what happened. And we’ve got a lot of good people to work with me that have been around this game a long time. And we look at all the factors surrounding each and every play. And we try to determine what’s right and what’s wrong and how wrong did it go.

And in this play, we’ve always said before—and it’s no different out on the street and any other action that we all are involved in—we’ve got to be accountable for the actions we take. And if bad things happen, that’s your risk. And in this case he decided to do something that resulted in a bad action but not a terribly bad result. And he was lucky.

If there was a worse result, maybe there would be more than me looking into it today, and that wouldn’t be good for any of us.

Q. Is the Jordin Tootoo incident under review?

COLIN CAMPBELL: No, it’s not.
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Old 10-13-2007, 03:41 PM   #100
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Default Will they ever learn?

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People asked in the aftermath of the Jesse Boulerice crosscheck to the jaw of Ryan Kesler, 'will they ever learn?' and the answer is: Some never will. How else to explain that exactly one day after Boulerice's cheap shot to Kesler's face, which resulted in a 25-game suspension Friday, there was another less-publicized incident in the Nashville Predators-Phoenix Coyotes' game, featuring superpest Jordin Tootoo, another player who seems to get in the middle of these things every year?

On the play in question, Tootoo caught the Coyotes' Daniel Winnik in the face with a shoulder check that — if nothing else — should have been called charging. With Winnik on the ice, his Coyotes' teammate Craig Weller then clothes-lined Tootoo in retaliation and received a match penalty for his troubles.

Tootoo played the innocent afterwards, claiming he delivered a nice clean check. Right. Sure. Nor was there any defence for Weller's response either. Perhaps on a different night, it wouldn't have caused a ripple either, but with the focus and attention of everyone in the NHL on blows to the head, here were two in a span of about five seconds which once again, demonstrated the reckless disregard of one player for another — and the fact that in the heat of battle, stuff happens.

More and more, it makes you realize that the answer doesn't lie strictly with the players themselves. Many prominent NHLers — none of them shrinking violets — spoke out in the aftermath of the Steve Downie hit and again after the Boulerice incident about their collective desire to eliminate head shots from the game.

Their feeling reflects a majority view - that there are just too many NHLers leaving the ice, with their brain cells unnecessarily scrambled, because a handful of their peers genuinely believe that what they're doing is perfectly acceptable within the culture that exists in today's NHL.

And probably it was, once upon a time. There are, however, signs, that the NHL is trying to change that mindset, one suspension at a time — the Boulerice suspension ties with Chris Simon for the longest in history, relating to an on-ice incident.

Maybe that approach will eventually work too.

But the league could fast-track the process by extending the discipline to the respective teams as well. Fines to the club, suspensions for the coach - those sorts of penalties might encourage teams to think twice about employing players who haven't yet figured out that the culture of head-hunting is going the way of the dodo.

The simplest solution might even be the least complicated — simply prevent a team from replacing a suspended player in the line-up.

Let's use the Philadelphia Flyers as an example. Currently, the Flyers have two players under suspension, Downie (for the pre-season hit on the Ottawa Senators' Dean McAmmond) and now Boulerice. The Flyers tried to circumvent the terms of Downie's 20-game suspension by assigning him to their American Hockey League affiliate, only to have the AHL close the loophole by suspending him themselves for a month. In all probability, they would have tried something similar with Boulerice, who has played more games in the minors (243) than in the NHL (165) since turning pro a decade ago (after a controversy-filled junior career in the Ontario Hockey League).

But what if the Flyers actually had to play two men short during the terms of Downie's and Boulerice's suspensions, dressing only 16 skaters as opposed to 18? That would greatly limit coach John Stevens' flexibility; it would have a tangible impact on the organization and its day-to-day operations; and it would do more than just punish the guilty players.

Suddenly, a team thinking of employing a Boulerice or a Downie type would need to weigh the risks against the rewards of doing so and just might conclude that it isn't worth it anymore — not if they could find themselves one, or in Philadelphia's case, two line-up spots short per game for an extended period of time.

Flyers' general manager Paul Holmgren was saying this week how the pair of suspensions "makes things tricky for the roster." Imagine how tricky things would become if his coach could only dress five defencemen and 11 forwards — or six defencemen and just 10 forwards — while his suspended players cool their heels on the sidelines.
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