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Old 03-30-2013, 02:03 PM   #56
Cito Pelon
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Originally Posted by gyldenlove View Post
Russia lost control of most of Manchuria to Japan around the time of world war I, they gained back control of parts of it in 1925 but lost it to Japan in world war 2. The Russians took it back in 1945 and the Chinese communists took it over in 1949 and used it as the power base to launch the Chinese revolution.

Kim Il Sung spend a lot of time in China, he grew up in Manchuria, he was a member of the chinese communist party in the 1930s and fought in chinese guerrilla groups against the Japanese in Manchuria, he later became a political officer of the chinese communist party.

Kim Il Sung had pretty tight relations with Mao, but after his death and the reforms of Deng Xiaopeng relations with China deteriorated as China no longer had any need to trade with North Korea when they opened up trades with Europe and especially North America.

Neither China nor Russia have strong political influence in North Korea these days, China has closed their borders completely to North Korea. China has an interest in North Korea keeping South Korea from becoming a dominant asian economy, but China has no interest in an all out war, firstly North Korea is very close to China and should it come to nuclear war the fallout will be felt in China, it will also shut down a lot of shipping which China relies heavily on for imports and exports.
Well, that's somewhat true. The Russians still control the parts of Manchuria they took way back under the Czars in the 19th century. Particularly the coastal area on the Sea of Japan and the border to North Korea. Then there was some land grabs by the Czars after the Boxer Wars in 1901 that included Mongolia I believe.

Yeah, there was some change of hands after the 1905 Russia-Japanese war, and more change of hands after 1944 when I believe Russia took Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands.

As I said, there has been some interesting dynamics in East Asia, and memories are long. China lost to Russia a good chunk of their sphere of influence as well as outright territory lost from about 1859 to WWII. And China hasn't regained it.
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