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Old 05-27-2011, 08:27 AM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v2micca View Post
Until then, I tend to agree with the following Data.

http://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/#/44444424534

Yes, the U.S.A. doesn't really top the list. But it still ranks significantly higher than Mexico.
Interesting data. When you indicate Safety as the primary value you care about....Mexico has the biggest movement down that chart over all countries included. ie. Mexico is the least safe country on their scale.


Mexico Key Findings

Personal security is a core element for the well-being of individuals, and largely reflects the risks of people being physically assaulted or falling victim to other types of crime. Across the OECD, victimisation rates for conventional crime (theft, robbery, assault) have declined in the new millennium. In Mexico, 15% of people reported falling victim to assault over the previous 12 months, much higher than the OECD average of 4% and the highest rate in the OECD. 34% of people feel unsafe on the street after dark, higher than the OECD average of 26%.

The homicide rate (the number of murders per 100,000 inhabitants) is a more reliable measure of a countryís safety level because, unlike other crimes, murders are usually always reported to the police. According to the latest OECD data, Mexicoís homicide rate has increased from 7 in 2002 to 11.6, much higher than the OECD average and the highest in the OECD.


United States Key Findings

Personal security is a core element for the well-being of individuals, and largely reflects the risks of people being physically assaulted or falling victim to other types of crime. Across the OECD, victimisation rates for conventional crime (theft, robbery, assault) have declined in the new millennium. In the United States, 2% of people reported falling victim to assault over the previous 12 months, lower than the OECD average of 4%. 19% of people feel unsafe on the street after dark, also lower than the OECD average of 26%.

The homicide rate (the number of murders per 100,000 inhabitants) is a more reliable measure of a countryís safety level because, unlike other crimes, murders are usually always reported to the police. According to the latest OECD data, the United Statesí homicide rate is 5.2, higher than the OECD average and one of the highest in the OECD.
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