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Drunk Monkey
07-15-2011, 02:43 PM
In the wake of Georgia Tech being fined $100,000 and placed on four years of probation for NCAA violations, Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas(notes) is denying allegations that he broke the rules by accepting extra benefits.




According to the NCAA, Georgia Tech should have ruled a player ineligible because he allegedly took gifts from a friend of a sports agency employee.


According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Thomas and Morgan Burnett(notes) may have taken clothes and other gifts at Georgia Tech. Thomas allegedly received $312 worth of clothes.


Thomas denied the allegations to the Denver Post through a text message.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=nfp-20110715_demaryius_thomas_says_he_didnt_take_gifts _at_georgia_tech

He messed up by only going for $312. Pryor is laughing his ass off right now.

bronco militia
07-15-2011, 02:45 PM
....**** the ncaa

Garcia Bronco
07-15-2011, 02:47 PM
....**** the ncaa

This

Kaylore
07-15-2011, 02:47 PM
In before KC fans finger their rectums in this thread!

schaaf
07-15-2011, 02:50 PM
$312? Are you ****ing kidding me???

Doggcow
07-15-2011, 02:54 PM
Ok this **** is getting ridiculous.

rbackfactory80
07-15-2011, 03:15 PM
He should of took the money. He certainly isn't gonna make it by being on the injury report.

Houshyamama
07-15-2011, 03:17 PM
I'm so ****ing sick of this ****.

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broncocalijohn
07-15-2011, 03:22 PM
If he did it, why just $312. And if he did, what did he know or not know by taking a small value of a gift?

Champagne Powder
07-15-2011, 03:25 PM
Great talent, but a phony person.

Came into the league with this high and mighty attitude like he was a choir boy.

This is what he had to say about Brandon Marshall last year.

"I feel like I got better character and I'm a better blocker."

cmhargrove
07-15-2011, 03:28 PM
He tried to accept the clothing, but he was injured in the dressing room and had to return it...

Ba dum bum.

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 03:31 PM
Quite frankly, I hope he did.

They deserve to, imo.

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 03:33 PM
Quite frankly, I hope he did.

They deserve to, imo.

To clarify this:

I think his only mistake was $312... wtf are you going to do with $312?!?!

Goddamn idiot.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 04:52 PM
Quite frankly, I hope he did.

They deserve to, imo.

No doubt.

For some reason we allow the NCAA to use up and spit out athletes without paying them the type of salaries they deserve for putting in work for the university.

One of these players needs to take the NCAA to federal court.

Tombstone RJ
07-15-2011, 05:00 PM
No doubt.

For some reason we allow the NCAA to use up and spit out athletes without paying them the type of salaries they deserve for putting in work for the university.

One of these players needs to take the NCAA to federal court.

yah because a free education (along with room and board, books, etc) isn't enough. You do realize how expensive a colleged education is dont you?

No one is forcing these kids to play ball...

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 05:02 PM
yah because a free education (along with room and board, books, etc) isn't enough. You do realize how expensive a colleged education is dont you?

No one is forcing these kids to play ball...

True, but they ARE forcing them to not hold jobs.

That's the inconsistency, imo.

Tombstone RJ
07-15-2011, 05:06 PM
True, but they ARE forcing them to not hold jobs.

That's the inconsistency, imo.

not sure about that... in fact, haven't programs like OU been penalized because they found the football players jobs where the players never showed up, yet still got paid?

I'm pretty sure you can hold down a job too, you just have to actually work at that job in order to get paid.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 05:14 PM
yah because a free education (along with room and board, books, etc) isn't enough. You do realize how expensive a colleged education is dont you?

No one is forcing these kids to play ball...

I paid for my own education, believe me, I felt every dollar.

The NCAA is a multibillion dollar industry that doesn't pay its most integral workers at all. Instead it pays them with imaginary money..."scholarships". The school doesn't have to pay that money out at all. They aren't losing money by placing these people in degree plans and putting them in classrooms. The only money they are out are the peripheral costs of running the program, which are easily covered in the course of the NCAA season.

Not all of these players want that education. Many of them would rather get paid to play football and live the "good life" as a young person with money.

It's not our job to social engineer them.

The idea that you take young black athletes (most football players are black) and force them to go to class to "educate" them is really pretty sick if you think about it. It comes off as a situation where these bureaucrats in academia are basically saying that these players don't deserve to be paid for their work, but need to be "educated" instead. Which pretty much sucks considering how little a college education is worth these days.

Tombstone RJ
07-15-2011, 05:25 PM
I paid for my own education, believe me, I felt every dollar.

The NCAA is a multibillion dollar industry that doesn't pay its most integral workers at all. Instead it pays them with imaginary money..."scholarships". The school doesn't have to pay that money out at all. They aren't losing money by placing these people in degree plans and putting them in classrooms. The only money they are out are the peripheral costs of running the program, which are easily covered in the course of the NCAA season.

Not all of these players want that education. Many of them would rather get paid to play football and live the "good life" as a young person with money.

It's not our job to social engineer them.

The idea that you take young black athletes (most football players are black) and force them to go to class to "educate" them is really pretty sick if you think about it. It comes off as a situation where these bureaucrats in academia are basically saying that these players don't deserve to be paid for their work, but need to be "educated" instead. Which pretty much sucks considering how little a college education is worth these days.

You do realize that if colleges and universities have to start paying their big program athletes that the cost of tuition will go up for everyone--you do understand this right?

As for your statement about just paying black athletes to play and forget about the "education" is another way to create long term problems for employment for these kids. After all, very few of these young kids make it to the pros after their time in college. And those who do make it to the big leagues may only play for a few years (like in the NFL). What happens after their playing career is over?

No thanks. I'd rather "force" them to study something and at least try and get an education because the long term affects are much better overall for our society. JMHO.

Rock Chalk
07-15-2011, 05:26 PM
No doubt.

For some reason we allow the NCAA to use up and spit out athletes without paying them the type of salaries they deserve for putting in work for the university.

One of these players needs to take the NCAA to federal court.

Right, because you know, scholarships are just so cheap to come by for normal folk.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 05:33 PM
yah because a free education (along with room and board, books, etc) isn't enough. You do realize how expensive a colleged education is dont you?

No one is forcing these kids to play ball...

Dude seriously... if I got fully tuition, room and board and book to play a sport at DU hells yeah I'd take it.

When you factor in tuition, meal plan, dorms, books, fees, student health care... the average yearly cost of attending DU is $68,000 a year.

I paid almost $3,000 on books my senior year alone.

These guys ARE getting paid.

If you don't like it, quit college and try to find a job.

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 05:35 PM
not sure about that... in fact, haven't programs like OU been penalized because they found the football players jobs where the players never showed up, yet still got paid?

I'm pretty sure you can hold down a job too, you just have to actually work at that job in order to get paid.

I should clarify... the NCAA doesn't allow them to hold jobs and get paid more than $2000 a year.

That's 38 dollars a week for:

Full time school
Extra work load of a student athlete
Part time employment

I'm not demeaning the value of their free education or calling them slaves, but... I mean that's just silly. They should get SOMETHING.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 05:35 PM
Right, because you know, scholarships are just so cheap to come by for normal folk.

I had an academic scholarship (what they should be funding more of) the GI Bill, my dad paid for my health insurance, and pulled $1,500 a month from the military... and every year I still came up about $3,000 short.

Tombstone RJ
07-15-2011, 05:41 PM
I should clarify... the NCAA doesn't allow them to hold jobs and get paid more than $2000 a year.

That's 38 dollars a week for:

Full time school
Extra work load of a student athlete
Part time employment

I'm not demeaning the value of their free education or calling them slaves, but... I mean that's just silly. They should get SOMETHING.

fair enough, but that's why they all have hot, rich girlfriends...^5

Rock Chalk
07-15-2011, 05:45 PM
I should clarify... the NCAA doesn't allow them to hold jobs and get paid more than $2000 a year.

That's 38 dollars a week for:

Full time school
Extra work load of a student athlete
Part time employment

I'm not demeaning the value of their free education or calling them slaves, but... I mean that's just silly. They should get SOMETHING.

They get room, board, meals for free.

I had no scholarship, paid my own way through college, worked full time and supported a GF that smoked more ****ing weed than a week than you see in the entire movie of Half Baked.

I'd trade that life for theirs every ****ing day of the week and twice on Saturdays (when they actually play football).

They can cry in someone else's ****ing milk dude. They didn't have to go to college, they could have waited it out and tried to be drafted by the NFL after 2 years of sitting on their ass and working like real folk and then, THEN they could bitch.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 05:47 PM
I had an academic scholarship (what they should be funding more of) the GI Bill, my dad paid for my health insurance, and pulled $1,500 a month from the military... and every year I still came up about $3,000 short.

I had academic scholarships as well and went to an expensive school.

DU is what 12K in tuition this year? Then you have cost of living and books. Books will cost you about 1K for two full-time semesters. Cost of living varies obviously, and you chose the cost that you incur there.

I have a hard time seeing where you're coming up with 34K a semester.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 05:52 PM
You do realize that if colleges and universities have to start paying their big program athletes that the cost of tuition will go up for everyone--you do understand this right?

That doesn't matter. The cost of a degree is already too high and a degree isn't worth what you pay for it unless you are competitive and choose a field that pretty much puts you right into the workforce when you get done. Those programs are pretty much limited to engineering and science fields and require advanced degrees in most cases.

Education needs reform. Badly. The system is failing.

As for your statement about just paying black athletes to play and forget about the "education" is another way to create long term problems for employment for these kids. After all, very few of these young kids make it to the pros after their time in college. And those who do make it to the big leagues may only play for a few years (like in the NFL). What happens after their playing career is over?

Is that the worry of the state? Should the state be concerned with identifying a group of people they label as inferior and "whipping them into shape"?

Maybe instead of creating a mentality of government dependence, we should be teaching government independence all the way back through pre-k.

Rock Chalk
07-15-2011, 06:02 PM
That doesn't matter. The cost of a degree is already too high and a degree isn't worth what you pay for it unless you are competitive and choose a field that pretty much puts you right into the workforce when you get done. Those programs are pretty much limited to engineering and science fields and require advanced degrees in most cases.

Education needs reform. Badly. The system is failing.



Is that the worry of the state? Should the state be concerned with identifying a group of people they label as inferior and "whipping them into shape"?

Maybe instead of creating a mentality of government dependence, we should be teaching government independence all the way back through pre-k.

Those are the only ****ing fields worth studying anyway. This is a god damn hi-tech world and if you cant hack it you deserve whatever you get.

broncosteven
07-15-2011, 06:02 PM
In the wake of Georgia Tech being fined $100,000 and placed on four years of probation for NCAA violations, Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas(notes) is denying allegations that he broke the rules by accepting extra benefits.




According to the NCAA, Georgia Tech should have ruled a player ineligible because he allegedly took gifts from a friend of a sports agency employee.


According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Thomas and Morgan Burnett(notes) may have taken clothes and other gifts at Georgia Tech. Thomas allegedly received $312 worth of clothes.


Thomas denied the allegations to the Denver Post through a text message.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=nfp-20110715_demaryius_thomas_says_he_didnt_take_gifts _at_georgia_tech

He messed up by only going for $312. Pryor is laughing his ass off right now.

Can I hit the mCd dead horse with a stick again? He was going to bring in tough, smart, character guys right?

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 06:11 PM
Those are the only ****ing fields worth studying anyway. This is a god damn hi-tech world and if you cant hack it you deserve whatever you get.

Ha!

I was talking to a friend last weekend who had just graduated from school with an English degree. I knew before asking what he was going to be doing with it...nothing. He works in insurance now and he's lucky to have that job (a 30K annual gig). You honestly don't need a degree at all to make that kind of money.

If a person wants to go to college, go for the purpose of getting a job. That idea on its own will funnel you into the right fields because if you just do a little research, you'll find out really quick which degrees will get you a job, and you'll then see why there are tons of other people trying to get those degrees too. Any humanities degree is a waste. Hard sciences and engineering (and business/management when the economy is better) are the way to go. You can also parlay those jobs into lucrative careers if you do a good job in your undergrad, set some goals, and make your way into professional school.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 06:16 PM
I had academic scholarships as well and went to an expensive school.

DU is what 12K in tuition this year? Then you have cost of living and books. Books will cost you about 1K for two full-time semesters. Cost of living varies obviously, and you chose the cost that you incur there.

I have a hard time seeing where you're coming up with 34K a semester.

DU cost of attendance (not including the full meal plan, which is like $7,000 a year). These are also conservative estimates as well.

http://www.du.edu/korbel/admissions/tuitionfees.html

The University of Denver's cost of attendance for the 2011-2012 academic year is as follows:

Tuition: $36,936.00 ($12,312/quarter)
Fees: $726.00
Books: $2,000.00
Room & board: $10,224.00
Personal expenses: $1,287.00
Transportation: $1,176.00
Loan fees $48.00
Health insurance: $2,420.00
Total cost of attendance: $54,817.00

Rock Chalk
07-15-2011, 06:24 PM
Ha!

I was talking to a friend last weekend who had just graduated from school with an English degree. I knew before asking what he was going to be doing with it...nothing. He works in insurance now and he's lucky to have that job (a 30K annual gig). You honestly don't need a degree at all to make that kind of money.

If a person wants to go to college, go for the purpose of getting a job. That idea on its own will funnel you into the right fields because if you just do a little research, you'll find out really quick which degrees will get you a job, and you'll then see why there are tons of other people trying to get those degrees too. Any humanities degree is a waste. Hard sciences and engineering (and business/management when the economy is better) are the way to go. You can also parlay those jobs into lucrative careers if you do a good job in your undergrad, set some goals, and make your way into professional school.


**** that you dont need a degree. I never finished and I make just under 100K a year. May not sound like much to some folk but **** I do OK thats over twice the annual average income.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 06:35 PM
**** that you dont need a degree. I never finished and I make just under 100K a year. May not sound like much to some folk but **** I do OK thats over twice the annual average income.

Oh, I agree.

A degree is not necessary to make yourself a good life, and many people I know who are self-taught in any field (even academic studies like history and philosophy) are more intelligent and better-educated than people I know with degrees in those fields.

Life is not about college. Its about life.

College these days is more of a 4-year bender and sex-athon with a side of indoctrination than it is an education.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 07:25 PM
College is completely necessary to create a well-rounded person.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 07:43 PM
College is completely necessary to create a well-rounded person.

Not at all.

It's not an academic environment anymore.

I studied science, so it was less this way in upper level and grad courses obviously , but in your core curriculum, you are indoctrinated. Thinking outside the box is now anathema in college.

Students who want to do well learn very quickly how to succeed. You just tell your prof what they want to hear and repeat their ideology back at them...whether you agree or not.

If you want "well rounded", find people who have made successes of themselves outside of college. They have to adapt to changing circumstance to propel themselves forward, and become much better more well rounded in the process.

Rockies Fan Douche
07-15-2011, 08:39 PM
remember brandon jennings? he played his first year out of hs in italy. banging italian babes beats doing hw!

i am with tombstone here. nobody is twisting their arm and forcing them to play ncaa football. what's the point of paying them $30K anyways? they are going to blow through the money within a year or two anyways. it's not sustainable.

the scholarship is an opportunity. if athletes are too dumb to take advantage of it, it's on them.

guess what? when they graduate, they have the edge over practically everybody in the student body. those boosters and football alums hook the players up. it's a network, a good ole boy's club. u think a ut-longhorns football player gets passed over by another candidate for a job in texas? hell no!!!!

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 08:41 PM
They get room, board, meals for free.

I had no scholarship, paid my own way through college, worked full time and supported a GF that smoked more ****ing weed than a week than you see in the entire movie of Half Baked.

I'd trade that life for theirs every ****ing day of the week and twice on Saturdays (when they actually play football).

They can cry in someone else's ****ing milk dude. They didn't have to go to college, they could have waited it out and tried to be drafted by the NFL after 2 years of sitting on their ass and working like real folk and then, THEN they could b****.

...And while you and her were smoking up through Computer Science 202, they were making the school millions.

Just sayin. :welcome:

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 08:45 PM
remember brandon jennings? he played his first year out of hs in italy. banging italian babes beats doing hw!

i am with tombstone here. nobody is twisting their arm and forcing them to play ncaa football. what's the point of paying them $30K anyways? they are going to blow through the money within a year or two anyways. it's not sustainable.

the scholarship is an opportunity. if athletes are too dumb to take advantage of it, it's on them.

guess what? when they graduate, they have the edge over practically everybody in the student body. those boosters and football alums hook the players up. it's a network, a good ole boy's club. u think a ut-longhorns football player gets passed over by another candidate for a job in texas? hell no!!!!

Considering most of them have the intellectual capacity of a moose and the boosters know it, yes, yes I do think they get passed over.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 08:53 PM
...And while you and her were smoking up through Computer Science 202, they were making the school millions.

Just sayin. :welcome:

The stadium at OU seats 82K. Average ticket price is over 100 bucks. OU rakes in ~8.2 mil in ticket sales to any one game. OU has 6 home games plus a game where they split the take with UT.

So, OU brings in close to ~50 mil a year just at the gate.

That doesn't even scratch the surface. There are TV licenses, concession sales, booster events, media licenses (video games, etc), apparel, goods, etc. They even use a loophole to use player likenesses to make money off of them. Last time I bought an OU jersey, it had #14 on it. Everyone familiar with football knows who that is, that's Sam Bradford. Video games also have player numbers and measurables. They even look like the players. Pretty shady, and if this were anything but the NCAA, the feds would have put the kilbosh on most of this stuff a long time ago.

TheReverend
07-15-2011, 08:56 PM
The stadium at OU seats 82K. Average ticket price is over 100 bucks. OU rakes in ~8.2 mil in ticket sales to any one game. OU has 6 home games plus a game where they split the take with UT.

So, OU brings in close to ~50 mil a year just at the gate.

That doesn't even scratch the surface. There are TV licenses, concession sales, booster events, media licenses (video games, etc), apparel, goods, etc. They even use a loophole to use player likenesses to make money off of them. Last time I bought an OU jersey, it had #14 on it. Everyone familiar with football knows who that is, that's Sam Bradford. Video games also have player numbers and measurables. They even look like the players. Pretty shady, and if this were anything but the NCAA, the feds would have put the kilbosh on most of this stuff a long time ago.

They make considerably more from TV deals.

And frankly they (the schools) should get also some money from the NFL, MLB, NBA, etc. Maybe not for being a farm league (when let's face it, it is), but for allowing damn near full autonomy to scouts, coaching video, pro days, etc.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 09:09 PM
Not at all.

It's not an academic environment anymore.

I studied science, so it was less this way in upper level and grad courses obviously , but in your core curriculum, you are indoctrinated. Thinking outside the box is now anathema in college.

Students who want to do well learn very quickly how to succeed. You just tell your prof what they want to hear and repeat their ideology back at them...whether you agree or not.

If you want "well rounded", find people who have made successes of themselves outside of college. They have to adapt to changing circumstance to propel themselves forward, and become much better more well rounded in the process.

That's half true. College is still an academic environment, I could probably identify the political/social beliefs of maybe half of my professors....

Seriously, if you're in a field like human rights law your professors are going to lean left and if you're at the business school they're going to lean right. That's common sense. I've had rightists in the former and leftists in the latter. DU has full-fleged Marxists, and I've heard a professor say that the only responsibility at CEO has is toward his shareholders (sans customers, the greater good, the environment, etc.).

The second part is true. I've been marked down in the past for perfectly legitimate reasons - I think given the AP/Chicago/APA/MLA style books, there are errors in every paper that professors ofter overlook. If they don't like you for whatever reason, they will find something wrong to mark you down for.

The final is absolutely true. Some people get lucky, but generally successful people have experienced things to get them there that make them better people. That said, I truly feel that there is not a single billionaire out there that hasn't screwed someone over or done something illegal to get there.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 09:39 PM
That's half true. College is still an academic environment, I could probably identify the political/social beliefs of maybe half of my professors....

I took my studies seriously and learned because I had to to get into grad school and because I wanted to know these things, I was interested. But most people skirt by.

Above all, I think that people are somewhat subconsciously conditioned by liberal arts college to do whatever their superiors tell them without question. To just accept what you are given and do what you are told. There is no sense of entrepreneurship, no sense of being the master of your own destiny that is being taught. Its "this is what is". It is only in science courses that I ever got "this is why this is". And that's why science rules. ;)

To get a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, you have to have somewhere close to 75 hours of core curriculum. Included in that curriculum are usually a heavy dose of various liberal arts courses. A world or british lit class is slated to teach you culture and philosophy. Most people do not know that...they just swallow the analysis and regurgitate it for the test. Most states require that you take two history classes, two political science classes, an economics class (or two), an arts course, a speech course, and a couple of composition courses. Those fields are dominated by liberal profs. So you get plenty of liberal indoctrination.


Seriously, if you're in a field like human rights law your professors are going to lean left and if you're at the business school they're going to lean right. That's common sense. I've had rightists in the former and leftists in the latter. DU has full-fleged Marxists, and I've heard a professor say that the only responsibility at CEO has is toward his shareholders (sans customers, the greater good, the environment, etc.).

Sure, that's why I talked about core curriculum. In the hard sciences, I have found a rather slightly more conservative bunch of profs. I had a chem prof from Sri Lanka who was extremely pro-US and pro-business and made commentary about it in class. I had an evolution teacher who was an evangelical christian in a public university.

Every neuro class I took taught by a psych prof was extremely liberal. They would talk about subjects completely unrelated to the class just so they could get their little bit in.

Grad school is much different. People don't have time for that crap and nobody cares.

The second part is true. I've been marked down in the past for perfectly legitimate reasons - I think given the AP/Chicago/APA/MLA style books, there are errors in every paper that professors ofter overlook. If they don't like you for whatever reason, they will find something wrong to mark you down for.

I had a development teacher drop me from an A to a B because I challenged a falsehood that she said in class. Her falsehood was politically oriented and I just asked her about it. She basically couldn't look at me in class after that. That was a crappy semester for me in that room! That's the last time I said anything like that to any prof.

The final is absolutely true. Some people get lucky, but generally successful people have experienced things to get them there that make them better people. That said, I truly feel that there is not a single billionaire out there that hasn't screwed someone over or done something illegal to get there.

I wouldn't say that success is defined by quantity, but by quality. I know guys that run small-medium-sized businesses who have showed that type of resillience, adaptability, and fortitude. They make good livings and enjoy their lives. They'll pass on assets to their children, they'll have provided jobs and livelihoods for people, and they'll have impacted their communities. Those guys are the model that our country needs. A kid with an anthropology degree who wants to be gifted a job is the type of person who will be dependent on others for the rest of their life. I'll take the small business owner every time over those kids, and those kids are being spit out by colleges by the ton.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 10:20 PM
I took my studies seriously and learned because I had to to get into grad school and because I wanted to know these things, I was interested. But most people skirt by.

Above all, I think that people are somewhat subconsciously conditioned by liberal arts college to do whatever their superiors tell them without question. To just accept what you are given and do what you are told. There is no sense of entrepreneurship, no sense of being the master of your own destiny that is being taught. Its "this is what is". It is only in science courses that I ever got "this is why this is". And that's why science rules. ;)

That's probably true.


To get a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, you have to have somewhere close to 75 hours of core curriculum. Included in that curriculum are usually a heavy dose of various liberal arts courses. A world or british lit class is slated to teach you culture and philosophy. Most people do not know that...they just swallow the analysis and regurgitate it for the test. Most states require that you take two history classes, two political science classes, an economics class (or two), an arts course, a speech course, and a couple of composition courses. Those fields are dominated by liberal profs. So you get plenty of liberal indoctrination.


DU has whats called a "common curriculum" aside from Major/Minor. I majored in International Relations (Concentrations in Security/Diplomacy and Macroeconomics) and double minored in Business Administration and Religious studies) ... the rest of the core consists of this:

- a year (3 classes) of science (I took Environmental Landforms (a lot of geology and biology), Chemistry, and Climatology... plus and additional environmental engineering course as an elective)
- a year of math
- two SOCS (social science credits - I took intro to Econ and Public Policy)
- Two composition classes (I'll talk about this one later)
- One writing-intensive topics course (I took modern and postmodern music theory)
- One technological science class (I took basic IT)
- Two humanities classes (I took Humanities 1 & 2 - ealry civilization to postmodern)
- 40 credit hours of electives (I took mostly political science, economics and philosophy electives, plus a fine wine/sommelier class)
- FOLA = 1 year of foreign language (I did a year of Spanish, Dutch and Arabic).


Sure, that's why I talked about core curriculum. In the hard sciences, I have found a rather slightly more conservative bunch of profs. I had a chem prof from Sri Lanka who was extremely pro-US and pro-business and made commentary about it in class. I had an evolution teacher who was an evangelical christian in a public university.


My management Econ prof was from India and he was hardcore pro-America. I couldn't pinpoint his politics though because he generally supported more financial/environmental regulation ... but he was big on free trade too.

These days, I'd say the hard sciences lean left. Especially environmental sciences. My dad is an evangelical Christian and a physicist and an environmental engineer... he's also a theistic evolutionist.


Every neuro class I took taught by a psych prof was extremely liberal. They would talk about subjects completely unrelated to the class just so they could get their little bit in.

Grad school is much different. People don't have time for that crap and nobody cares.

I had a development teacher drop me from an A to a B because I challenged a falsehood that she said in class. Her falsehood was politically oriented and I just asked her about it. She basically couldn't look at me in class after that. That was a crappy semester for me in that room! That's the last time I said anything like that to any prof.


That's lame. You can challenge this stuff with a simple piece of paper. I had an A- turn into an A and a C- turn into an A- after challenging my profs on their BS.


I wouldn't say that success is defined by quantity, but by quality. I know guys that run small-medium-sized businesses who have showed that type of resillience, adaptability, and fortitude. They make good livings and enjoy their lives. They'll pass on assets to their children, they'll have provided jobs and livelihoods for people, and they'll have impacted their communities. Those guys are the model that our country needs. A kid with an anthropology degree who wants to be gifted a job is the type of person who will be dependent on others for the rest of their life. I'll take the small business owner every time over those kids, and those kids are being spit out by colleges by the ton.


In the aforementioned Management Economics class I wrote a paper arguing for the need for people like that and the institutions that support them. I guess that might be why college is so expensive. But I'm into it. I enjoy the social sciences quite a bit but I guess I'm a nerd like that.

Plus those things are just good for the population to know... if we don't have anthro PhD's then who is going to teach anthro?

Oh yeah... the prof I had for composition worked for John McCain.

Mogulseeker
07-15-2011, 10:37 PM
One more thing: Peter Jennings is totally successful - he's the anchor of NBC nightly news. And he says his biggest regret is never graduating college.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 10:42 PM
These days, I'd say the hard sciences lean left. Especially environmental sciences. My dad is an evangelical Christian and a physicist and an environmental engineer... he's also a theistic evolutionist.

Your dad and I would have alot to talk about. I am a non-denominational naturalist christian who is interested in the problems caused by quantum theory and how they relate to naturalism.

That's lame. You can challenge this stuff with a simple piece of paper. I had an A- turn into an A and a C- turn into an A- after challenging my profs on their BS.

I wrote a letter to the department and they shot me down. I learned pretty quick after that one though. Save the discussion for somewhere else. Isn't that crazy? Discussion stifled in a college classroom?

In the aforementioned Management Economics class I wrote a paper arguing for the need for people like that and the institutions that support them. I guess that might be why college is so expensive. But I'm into it. I enjoy the social sciences quite a bit but I guess I'm a nerd like that.

I enjoy sociology and anthropology too. I studied native american culture and history as well. The bad thing about those fields is that it is extremely difficult to parlay those degrees into a job. You pretty much have to know somebody, and even then they don't pay well enough to justify the expense of a college degree.

epicSocialism4tw
07-15-2011, 10:45 PM
One more thing: Peter Jennings is totally successful - he's the anchor of NBC nightly news. And he says his biggest regret is never graduating college.

He can always graduate college.

But the thing about guys like Peter Jennings is that they have a sort of subtle worship of intelligencia. The news media is full of that stuff. Probably because they are mostly journalism majors, which isn't necessarily much of an academic field. They learn how to investigate and report on other peoples' work.