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View Full Version : OT: Digital Light Field Photography - Very Cool.


mkporter
06-30-2011, 08:21 PM
These guys are going to make some serious $$$ if they can pull this off. Very cool technology:

http://www.lytro.com/

sisterhellfyre
06-30-2011, 11:44 PM
That is amazing. I signed up to reserve one, so I'll just have to wait and see about the price tag.

huh??
07-01-2011, 12:02 AM
Interesting. Seems to have more to do with the post image software. I wonder if the camera uses a very closed down f-stop for the broadest depth of field and alters the bokeh (out of focus) area based on where you click. The samples I goofed around with didn't have much in the way of low light or action. Not sure though. I've been workin' on a little Seagram's 7 Dark Honey since I got home from work.

sisterhellfyre
07-01-2011, 12:23 AM
Oh, the interesting places this could lead if it works. What do you get if you combine this with CGI, holography, and 3-D conversions? The first photograph taken, in 1826, took eight hours of exposure but led directly to the first movie in 1888. Only four frames and less than two seconds long... but look where we are now.

vancejohnson82
07-01-2011, 12:57 AM
whatever..."Light Rail" Photography would be better

cutthemdown
07-01-2011, 01:09 AM
Makes sense. Sort of like capture all the light, sort it out later? very cool.

Pony Boy
07-01-2011, 08:09 AM
Cool...when did Al Gore invent this?

Kaylore
07-01-2011, 09:16 AM
Now I can rack-focus my pictures!!!


....why would I want to do that again?

Chris
07-01-2011, 09:57 AM
I tend to screw up exposure more than I do focus. Getting solid focus of something motion however, this could be very useful for.

ICON
07-01-2011, 10:02 AM
reserved one.

mkporter
07-01-2011, 10:25 AM
Oh, the interesting places this could lead if it works. What do you get if you combine this with CGI, holography, and 3-D conversions? The first photograph taken, in 1826, took eight hours of exposure but led directly to the first movie in 1888. Only four frames and less than two seconds long... but look where we are now.

There could be some very interesting applications of this for sure. They apparently have demonstrated a 3d system.

mkporter
07-01-2011, 10:40 AM
Interesting. Seems to have more to do with the post image software. I wonder if the camera uses a very closed down f-stop for the broadest depth of field and alters the bokeh (out of focus) area based on where you click. The samples I goofed around with didn't have much in the way of low light or action. Not sure though. I've been workin' on a little Seagram's 7 Dark Honey since I got home from work.

There is certainly a lot of processing involved, but the camera has some interesting technology too. The idea is that image sensors are growing in resolution at an exponential rate, and have already far exceeded the maximum usable resolution for classical photography. The camera they designed uses a large image sensor, and overlays a grid of microlenses over it (a plenoptic camera) to capture images at many different focal lengths simultaneously, in effect capturing the entire light "field."

This is the founder's thesis, which is a surprisingly easy read (at least parts of it): http://www.lytro.com/renng-thesis.pdf

mkporter
07-01-2011, 10:43 AM
Now I can rack-focus my pictures!!!


....why would I want to do that again?

Sometimes you aren't able to focus on the rack properly when you take a picture. This would allow you to correct that after the fact. No one likes a blurry rack.

;D

Chris
07-01-2011, 10:46 AM
rack focusing

banned in utah since 1901