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View Full Version : The Pakistani ISI kills a journalist who exposed them


Chris
05-31-2011, 03:05 PM
Here's the bad news:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-13599172

Here's the article he wrote:

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/ME27Df06.html

Tombstone RJ
05-31-2011, 03:17 PM
Very telling and very sad.

HILife
05-31-2011, 03:19 PM
Freedom of Speech?

OBF1
05-31-2011, 03:26 PM
Freedom of Speech?

Freedom of speech only applies in the USA.

I think we need to send more billions to Pakistan. That place is a joke and a haven for terrorism.

Smiling Assassin27
05-31-2011, 03:37 PM
Shocking. [/sarc]

Archer81
05-31-2011, 04:27 PM
In before Gaff blames the Jews.

Its becoming increasingly obvious the US needs to spend more time associating with countries that share its values rather than buddying up with psuedo terrorist states.

:Broncos:

gtown
05-31-2011, 08:22 PM
Freedom of speech only applies in the USA.

I think we need to send more billions to Pakistan. That place is a joke and a haven for terrorism.

Hate to say it, but it is true. If Pakistan didn't have nukes, I wouldn't care, but they do and the thought that a terrorist group could get a hold of that type of weapon keeps me up at night.

BroncoMan4ever
05-31-2011, 08:53 PM
Freedom of speech only applies in the USA.

I think we need to send more billions to Pakistan. That place is a joke and a haven for terrorism.

bull**** it exists in the USA.

free speech is a myth. sure we can say anything we want but there are repurcussions to anything that is not PC. granted the penalties are nowhere near as harsh as in other parts of the world, but freedom of speech is a myth.

look at all the people who have been kicked out of their media jobs for saying something that wasn't politically correct or was even slightly upsetting.

Don Imus calling the Rutgers basketball team nappy headed ho's had Jesse Jackson's annoying dumb ass popping out and calling for the guys head shortly after he was fired.

that is the first instance i can think of, but there are lots more scenarios where freedom of speech was not allowed.

brncs_fan
05-31-2011, 09:05 PM
bull**** it exists in the USA.

free speech is a myth. sure we can say anything we want but there are repurcussions to anything that is not PC. granted the penalties are nowhere near as harsh as in other parts of the world, but freedom of speech is a myth.

look at all the people who have been kicked out of their media jobs for saying something that wasn't politically correct or was even slightly upsetting.

Don Imus calling the Rutgers basketball team nappy headed ho's had Jesse Jackson's annoying dumb ass popping out and calling for the guys head shortly after he was fired.

that is the first instance i can think of, but there are lots more scenarios where freedom of speech was not allowed.

Freedom of speech/press was only meant to keep the government from restricting one's words to promote a democratic exchange of ideas.

If you mess up at your job because you can't keep your mouth shut then that is your problem.

cutthemdown
05-31-2011, 09:19 PM
When you can be killed for what you write, that is some hard core journalism.

cutthemdown
05-31-2011, 09:20 PM
Free speech has never meant you can say whatever you want with no consequences.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 09:46 PM
Free speech has never meant you can say whatever you want with no consequences.

The price of honesty is often very high.

cutthemdown
05-31-2011, 09:54 PM
The price of honesty is often very high.

IMO the price of dishonestly will always be higher.

Odysseus
05-31-2011, 10:14 PM
IMO the price of dishonestly will always be higher.

In business, as in life, it is cheaper, wiser, and smarter to just tell the truth.

cutthemdown
05-31-2011, 10:19 PM
In business, as in life, it is cheaper, wiser, and smarter to just tell the truth.

as I get older I realize that lying can be easier, profitable, in the short term, but long term its not. Just part of growing wiser I guess. Maybe in a few more decades I won't be an ass all the time. :)

Odysseus
06-01-2011, 01:48 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Inside-Al-Qaeda-Taliban-Beyond-Laden/dp/0745331017/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1306914127&sr=8-1

Interesting what he presupposes in his writings.

Odysseus
06-01-2011, 01:52 AM
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1439172498/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=

Obama's wars is an interesting aside to this poor journalist demise. Obama is pressuring the Army to end operations in Afghanistan.

Everything in Iraq is supposed to come to a close end of this year unless something changes that course.

It’s hard to understand why the government gets so irate over secrets spilled by WikiLeaks when top members of the cabinet and the military, as well as the president himself, so readily sit down with Bob Woodward. In his first foray into the weeds of the Obama administration’s war-decision process, Woodward offers readers these nuggets: the CIA finances and controls a 3,000-man secret army in Afghanistan; despite our various efforts over two administrations, the U.S. remains alarmingly unprepared for a terrorist attack, which, by the way, could come any day. He also reveals all the details of a highly confidential document on war strategy (given to Woodward when he simply asked one of the planners for it). But most of the book is devoted to what is probably not a secret: the infighting that goes into every decision that is or isn’t made about the war in Afghanistan. Woodward’s descriptions of war-strategy meetings suggest the movie Groundhog Day, with everyone saying the same thing over and over. The military and Hillary Clinton want 40,000 troops sent to Afghanistan. Joe Biden has a different plan, less dependent on personnel. The president wants more and different options, which aren’t given to him (“People have to stop telling me what I already know”). Finally, he has to modify the plan himself. The end of the book seems rushed, as though it was pushing up against deadline, with one of Obama’s most important war decisions, the firing of General Stanley McChrystal, just tacked on. By the wearying end, the conclusion is obvious: there’s no good way to end this war. No matter how much the White House and the military despise the word failure, with allies like the Karzai government in Afghanistan and the duplicitous Pakistanis, it’s hard to find any semblance of success in the offing. There is certainly none on view in these pages. --Ilene Cooper

Odysseus
06-01-2011, 01:56 AM
as I get older I realize that lying can be easier, profitable, in the short term, but long term its not. Just part of growing wiser I guess. Maybe in a few more decades I won't be an ass all the time. :)

The sad thing is when you meet old liars who are so invested in their lies that they would rather die in their lies than face any truth.

http://www.amazon.com/State-Denial-Bush-War-Part/dp/B00164CN0Y/ref=pd_sim_b_3

As a point of contrast...

Chris
06-01-2011, 10:12 AM
I think Freedom of Speech is alive and well in America but when you have a job that requires objectivity or have a platform not at all related to your views then you don't blurt them out.